Conical or nearly so Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
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Total mushrooms fount: 196

Inedible
Mycena leaiana (Berk.) Sacc. Cap 1-5cm across, bell-shaped becoming convex, with center sometimes depressed; bright reddish orange becoming more yellow in age; slimy, shiny, smooth. Gills adnate, close to crowded, broad; dirty yellow-pink, staining orange-yellow when cut, with bright red-orange edges. Stem 30-70 x 1-3mm, tough, fibrous; orange to yellow, paler near apex, exuding a little watery, orange juice; slimy and somewhat sticky with base covered in dense, coarse hairs. Flesh thickish, pliant; white beneath the orange cuticle. Odor faintly mealy. Taste slight. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 7-10 x 5-6-. Deposit white. Habitat in dense clusters on deciduous wood. Common. Throughout central and eastern states of North America. Season f one-September. Edibility not known- avoid. ----------- This month's fungi, Mycena leaiana, is a great mushroom to find in the woods. It's shiny orange, with glowing orange marginate gills (more on that later), and therefore often sticks out from an extended distance. Despite the fact that the mushrooms themselves are very small at maturity, usually significantly less than an inch (3 cm) in diameter, they could be very prolific fruiters, so there is a huge amount of it to be seen often. Even in dry weather you could find it since it uses this found very deep in the log to create its fruiting bodies. Understand that mushrooms are 90-95% normal water, so if there is no drinking water there are no mushrooms, but Mycena leaiana appears to be an excellent scavenger of drinking water through its mycelium from solid wood. The edibility of the fungus is unidentified, but is as yet not known to be poisonous. That said, there appears to be nothing at all to recommend it for the stand anyway, since it is rather small and has a fairly rubbery surface if you make an effort to cut it. The orange color comes off on the hands when you touch it, and it might be dreamed by me would do the same in the mouth area. So how about these marginate gills? If you look on the lower of the mushroom, you can view that the gills are orange. This seems just like a contradiction, because the spore printing is white. In the event that you look just a little deeper however, e.g. with a side lens, you can view that the orange color is mainly limited to the advantage of the gills. A straight closer look with a microscope reveals that the orange pigment is mainly limited to cystidia, sterile cells at the edge of the gill. Cystidia on the border of the gill are medically called "cheilocystidia" (practically, "lip cystidia"). Compare these to the "pleurocystidia" ("part cystidia") entirely on (you guessed it) the attributes of the gills of Pluteus cervinus. Mycena leaiana microscopic mix portion of the gills The cystidia are shiny orangeBelow and the left you can view what these cystidia appear to be microscopically. Observe that the strikingly beautiful orange cystidia include almost all of the advantage of the gill, offering this varieties its quality orange margin. However if you look from the gill advantage toward the basidia (basidiospore producing set ups), you will get some wayward orange cystidia borne singly on the list of basidia often.
Edible
Coprinus Coprinus comatus (Fr.) S. F. Gray. Shaggy Mane, Shaggy Inkcap, Lawyer's Wig, Coprin chevelu, Schopftintling, Agarico chiomato, Geschubde inktzwam, Gyapjas tintagomba. Cap 3-7cm across when expanded, more or less a tall ovoid when young, becoming more cylindrical as it expands; white and very shaggy-scaly, often with a pale brownish "skullcap" at apex; margin of the cap dissolves away and progresses steadily upward until the entire cap has liquified away, including the gills. Gills free, crowded, very narrow; white becoming black and inky from the margin upward. Stem 60-120 x 10-20mm, very tall, straight, with a slightly bulbous base, hollow in center; white; smooth, with a ring of veil tissue left lower down on the stem. Flesh soft, fibrous; white. Odor (when young) pleasant. Taste similar. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, with germ pore at apex, (12)13-17(18) x 7-9?. Deposit black. Habitat often in large numbers on roadsides, lawns, and other urban sites, especially where the soil has been disturbed. Found throughout North America and Europe. Season sometimes in the spring but usually July-November. Edible and delicious when young.
Edible
Volvariella bombycina (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Volvaria bombycina (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Kummer. Wolliger Scheidling ?ri?s bocskorosgomba Volvaire soyeuse Silky Rosegill. Cap 5?20cm across, ovate then bell-shaped, whitish covered in long fine yellowish silky, almost hair-like fibres. Stem 70?150 x 10?20mm, often curved, tapering upwards from the bulbous base; volva membranous, large and persistant, somewhat viscid, white at first discolouring dingy brown. Flesh white becoming faintly yellowish. Taste slight, smell pleasant, like that of bean sprouts. Gills crowded, white at first then flesh-pink. Spore print pink. Spores elliptic, 8.5?10 x 5?6um. Habitat dead frondose trees, Maple, elm, and others, often in knot-holes or hollow trunks. Season early summer to autumn. Rare. Edible (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Tricholoma portentosum (Fr.) Qu?l. Tricolome pr?tentieux, Bise d'automne, Schwarzfaseriger Ritterling, Sz?rke pereszke, Tricoloma portentoso, Glanzende ridderzwam. Cap 5?10cm across, conical to bell-shaped, expanding with a broad umbo, light grey to grey-black covered in fine radiating innate streaks often with olivaceous or violaceous tints. Stem 40?100 x 10?20mm, white, often becoming flushed lemon-yellow. Flesh white. Taste and smell mealy. Gills white then lemon-yellow. Spore print white. Spores 5?6 x 3.5?5um. Habitat with conifers. Season autumn. Occasional. Edible with caution. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Tricholoma myomyces (Fr.) Lange, Feny?pereszke, eg?rsz?rke pereszke. Cap I-7cm across, obtusely conic expanding to convex, then flat with a low umbo; margin incurved at first, then often wavy; dark drab gray to brownish gray or blackish gray, generally paler on the margin; dry, densely matted, and hairy on the disc and hairy to scaly elsewhere. Gills arcuate to sinuate, close, broad; light gray, fading near the stem in age, very rarely discoloring with dull yellow spots. Stem 15-70 x 5-10mm, solid or hollow, generally rounded or abruptly tapered; white to pale gray; silky with white or gray hairs. Veil a cortina of white or gray hairs that leaves a faint, quickly disappearing zone on the stem. Flesh pale gray. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, nonamyloid, 6.7-7.6 x 4.3-4.8? (4-spored form), 8.6-1 1.4 x 3.8-5.7? (2-spored form). Deposit white. Habitat in groups or dense clusters under conifers in woods or on lawns. Frequent and sometimes abundant. Found in Europe and widely distributed in northern North America. Season August-October. Edibility not known -avoid.
Inedible
Tricholoma albobrunneum (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer. Tricolome brun et blanc, Weissbrauner Ritterling, Keserny?s pereszke, Agarico bianco e bruno, Witbruine ridderzwam. Cap 5?8cm across, conico-convex, reddish-brown and covered in fine innate radiating fibrils, greasy or viscid. Stem 60?80 x 10?15mm, whitish above the distinctive ring zone but reddish brown below remaining slightly scaly in the upper portion. Flesh white tinged brownish below the cap cuticle and towards the stem base. Smell faintly mealy. Gills white, reddish-brown with age. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptical, 5 x 3?4um. Habitat with conifers. Season autumn. Rare. Edible ? poor and indigestible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Hallucinogenic
Psilocybe semilanceata (Fr. ex Secr.) Kummer. Liberty Cap or Magic Mushroom, Spitzkegeliger Kahlkopf, Hegyescs?cs? badargomba, Puntig kaalkopje. Cap 0.5?1.5cm across, elongate conical with a distinct sharply pointed umbo, puckered at margin, hygrophanous, yellowish-brown with olivaceous tinge drying ochre-buff, covered with a viscid pellicle. Stem 25?75 x 1?2mm, white to cream, sometimes with a bluish tinge at the stem base. Flesh cream to pallid. Gills pale clay at first, finally dark purple-brown. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores elliptic, 11.5?14.5 x 7?9um. Habitat lawns, pasture and roadsides. Season late summer to late autumn. Frequent. Hallucinogenic. Edible but not recommended. Hallucinogenic and widely collected for this purpose, but should be regarded as mildly poisonous; also, there is the possibility of misidentification. Distribution, America and Europe.
Hallucinogenic
Psilocybe merdaria (Fr.) Ricken Stropharia merdaria (Fr.) Qu-l. syn. Dung-Tr-uschling. Cap 2-5cm across, obtusely bell-shaped then flattened convex, ochraceous, more cinnamon when moist, viscid. Stem 50-75 x 4-6mm, dry, whitish flushed straw-yellow, base covered in white down. Flesh white, becoming brownish in stem when old. Smell none. Gills pallid then purplish-brown. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, lageniform. Spore print brown-black. Spores broadly elliptical and often somewhat angular, with germ-pore, 10-16 x 8-9um. Habitat on horse dung. Season late summer to autumn. Uncommon. Edibility unknown, possibly slightly hallucinogenic although it has not been investigated in detail, all hallucinogenic mushrooms can be dangerous to eat. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Psathyrella pennata (Fr.) Pearson & Dennis syn. Drosophila pennata (Fr.) K?hn. & Romagn. Brand-Faserling Szenes porhany?sgomba. Cap 1?2.5cm across, broadly bell-shaped, grey-brown to reddish-brown becoming ochre, covered in whitish cottony fibrils or scales especially towards the margin. Stem 25?50 x 2?4mm, whitish. Flesh thin, brownish in cap, whitish to ochraceous in stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pallid to purplish-grey. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, acutely fusiform. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores pip-shaped, 8?9 x 4?4.5um. Habitat on fire sites. Season early summer to autumn. Common. Edibility unknown -avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Psathyrella multipedata (Peck) Smith B?scheliger Faserling Clustered Brittlestem Csoportos porhany?sgomba. Fruit bodies growing in very dense tufts of up to seventy individuals arising from a common base. Cap 1?3cm across, conical-convex, dingy clay-brown drying or ageing cream, striate. Stem 70?120 x 2?4mm, whitish. Flesh thin, whitish. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills dark purplish-brown. Cystidia thin-walled, narrowly fusoid with somewhat swollen base. Spore print dark brown. Spores elliptic, 6.5?10 x 3.5?4.5um. Habitat amongst grass in open deciduous woodland and roadsides. Season summer. Rare. Edibility unknown -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Psathyrella gracilis (Fr.) Qu?l. T?r?keny porhany?sgomba. Cap 2-5cm across, campanulate; yellow-ochre to buff brown, pinkish when dry; glabrous. Gills adnate, crowded, broad; pallid then pinkish brown. Stem 60-120 x 2-3mm; white; pruinose at first. Flesh whitish. Spores ellipsoid, 1 I-14 x 6.5-8p.. Deposit purplish brown. Pleurocystidia with an acute apex, 54-75 x 10-16?. Habitat scattered on soil. Found in Europe and throughout North America. Season August-October. Edibility not known -avoid.
Inedible
Panaeolus sphinctrinus (Fr.) Qu-l. syn. Paneolus campanulatus var. sphinctrinus (Fr.) Qu-l. New syn. Panaeolus papilionaceus Gez-huter D-ngerling Csipk-s (halv-ny) tr-gyagomba. Cap 2-4cm across, broadly conical to bell-shaped sometimes with a slight umbo, dark grey to almost black when moist drying out pale grey with dark ochre centre, margin overhanging gills forming pale delicate teeth. Stem 60-120 x 2-3mm, grey, paler at apex. Flesh thin, pale grey. Gills adnate, grey soon becoming black, edge white. Spore print black. Spores lemon-shaped, 14-18 x 10-12um. Habitat in pastureland, on or near dung. Season late spring to autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Panaeolus rickenii Hora Wiesend-ngerling V-r-sbarna tr-gyagomba. Cap 1-2cm across, convex to conical with prominent umbo, dark brown and striate at margin when moist drying pale buff or tan, flushed tan towards centre. Stem 50-100 x 2-3m, pinkish brown or tan with paler apex. Flesh thin, tan. Taste not distinctive, smell mushroomy. Gills adnate, grey soon becoming black. Spore print black. Spores lemon-shaped, 13-16 x 9.5-11um. Habitat in damp pastureland. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Panaeolina foenisecii (Pers. ex Fr.) Maire syn. Psilocybe foenisecii (Pers. ex Fr.) Qu?l. syn Panaeolus foenisecii (Pers. ex Fr.) Schroeter Heud?ngerling R?ti tr?gyagomba Brown Mottlegill. Cap 1?2cm across, bell-shaped to convex, dark dull-brown drying out pale clay brown from the rust-coloured centre outwards to the margin which often remains darker. Stem 40?70 x 2?3mm, paler than cap. Flesh buff to pale brown. Smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, pale brown when young soon becoming mottled darker. Spore print brownish black. Spores lemon-shaped, rough, with germ-pore, 12?15 x 7?8.5um. Habitat in grassland and on lawns and roadsides. Season summer to autumn. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mycena renati Qu?l. Syn M. flavipes Qu?l. S?rgat?nk? k?gy?gomba. Cap bell-shaped, 1.5-4cm across dull pink, brown or ochre, gills whitish edges may show slight change of colour. Stem golden yellow to yellow-brown. Smell nitrous. Spores 7.5-10 x 4.5-6.5um. Found on rotting deciduous wood and stumps. Rare in Britain, much more common in eastern Europe. These photographs were given by Dr. Barth? Lor?nd from Hungary.
Inedible
Mycena polygramma (Bull. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray Rillstieliger Helmling Bar?zd?ltt?nkű k?gy?gomba Grooved Bonnet. Cap 2–5cm across, conical then expanded and umbonate, dark grey to grey-brown, faintly grooved towards margin. Stem 60–100 x 2–4mm, silvery grey, striate, base rooting. Flesh thin, whitish with pallid line above gills. Taste mild to slightly acrid, smell pleasant. Gills whitish to grey or pinkish. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, with swollen base and drawn-out pointed apex which may fork. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, amyloid, 9–10 x 6–7um. Habitat on twigs or buried wood. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena pelianthina (Fr.) Qu?l. Schwarzz?hniger Helmling Feketeszeg?lyű k?gy?gomba Blackedge Bonnet. Cap 2–4cm across, bell-shaped with a broad umbo expanding to almost flat, brownish with violaceous tint drying pale buff. Stem 50–60 x 4–8mm, violaceous brown, fibrous at base. Flesh thin, at margin, white. Taste mild, smell faintly radishy. Gills adnate, distant, violaceous with darker, sometimes uneven edge. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia thin-walled, cylindric to slightly fusoid. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 5–7 x 2.5–3um. Habitat in beech litter. Season summer to autumn.Uncommon. Said to be edible but not worthwhile -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena leptocephala (Pers. ex Fr.) Gillet syn. M. ammoniaca ([Fr.] Secr.) Qu-l. s. Pearson syn. M. alcalina var. chlorinella Lange Rauchiger Helmling Szalmi-kos k-gy-gomba, sal-tromos k-gy-gomba. Cap 1-1.5cm across, bell-shaped, smoky grey, striate when moist, opaque and grooved when dry. Stem 30-55 x 1-2mm, greyish with paler apex, base woolly white and slightly rooting. Flesh thin, whitish darkening towards the stem base. Taste mild, smelling strongly of ammonia or ozone. Gills pale grey with whitish edge. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, cylindric, fusoid often forked at apex. Spore print whitish. Spores ellipsoid to subcylindric, amyloid, 5-10 x 4-7um. Habitat in short grass. Season autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mycena inclinata (Fr.) Qu?l. Buntstieliger Helmling Cifra k?gy?gomba Myc?ne inclin? Clustered Bonnet. Cap 2?3cm across, conical expanding to bell-shaped with prominent umbo, bay, darker and lined towards centre, lighter in colour when dry, margin slightly overhanging the gills giving a delicately scalloped appearance. Stem 50?100 x 2?4mm, whitish at apex deepening to dark red-brown towards the base which is covered in fine white down. Flesh thin, whitish. Taste mild, smell mealy or rancid. Gills adnate, whitish becoming flesh-pink. Cheilocystidia clavate, the apex covered with relatively long filiform irregular processes. Spore print white. Spores ovoid, amyloid, 8?9 x 6?7um. Habitat in dense tufts on oak stumps. Season late summer to autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
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