Other Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
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Total mushrooms fount: 338

Inedible
Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Plyporus cinnabarina Jacq. ex Fr. syn. Trametes cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Fr. Cinnabar Polypore, Polypore ou Tram-te rouge cinabre, Zinnoberschwamm, Cin-bertapl-, Vermiljoenhoutzwam. Fruit body 3-11cm across, 2-8cm wide, 0.5-1.5cm thick, semicircular or fan-shaped, leathery becoming corky when dried; upper surface covered in fine soft hairs when young, later smooth and slightly wrinkled, bright red or orange-red becoming less bright with age. Tubes 2-6mm long, pale orange. Pores 2-3 per mm, circular or angular, cinnabar- or saffron-red. Spores white, oblong-ellipsoid, 4.5-6 x 2-2.5um. Hyphal structure trimitic. Habitat on dead deciduous trees, especially cherry, beech and birch. Season autumn. Very rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Pseudohydnum gelatinosum (Scop. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Tremellodon gelatinosum (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Jelly Tongue, Tremellodon g?latineux, Tremelle g?latineuse, Gallertiger Zitterzahn, Kocsony?s ?lgereben, Eispilz, Stekeltrilzwam or IJszwammetje. Fruit body 2?6cm across, spatula-like or fan-shaped, gelatinous, bluish-grey becoming brownish, upper surface finely roughened or downy; lower surface covered in whitish spines 2?5mm long. Spores white, broadly ovate to subglobose, 5?7 x 5?. Basidia resembling a hot cross bun when seen from above. Habitat on conifer stumps. Season autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Poronia punctata (L. ex Fr.) Fr. Speldeprikzwam, Nail Fungus. Fruit body 0.5?2cm high, flattened disc 0.5?1.5cm across, whitish dotted black with the tips of the perithecia when mature, attached to the substrate by a long black cylindrical stalk. Asci 180 x 18?. Spores bean-shaped, smooth, 18?26 x 7?12?. Habitat on horse dung. Season autumn. Although abundant in the last century, this species became quite rare in modern times due to the decline in the use of horses. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Polyporus badius (Pers. ex S. F. Gray) Schur. syn. P. picipes Fr. Schwarzfussporling Barna likacsosgomba Polypore - pied couleur de poix. Cap 5-20cm across, infundibuliform, often lopsided and lobed, viscid when fresh drying smooth and shiny, pallid grey-brown at first then chestnut, darker at the centre, very thin. Stem 20-35 x 5-15mm, usually eccentric, black at least at the base. Taste bitter. Tubes 0.5-2.5mm long, white later cream, decurrent down the stem. Pores 4-7 per mm, circular, white to cream. Spores white, elongate-ellipsoid, 5-9 x 3-4um. Hyphal structure dimitic with generative and binding hyphae; generative hyphae lacking clamps. Habitat on dead or living deciduous trees. Season spring to autumn, annual. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Pleurotus pulmonarius (Fr.) Qu?l Lungen-Seitling Ny?ri laskagomba Pale Oyster. Cap 2?10cm across, fan- or shell-shaped in overlapping groups, white to cream. Stem very short, lateral. Flesh white. Smell of flour or ammonia. Gills crowded, white then ochraceous-cream. Spore print white. Spores cylindric, 7.5?11 x 3?4um. Habitat in clusters on deciduous trees. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Piptoporus betulinus (Bull. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Polyporus betulinus Bull. ex Fr. Birch Polypore or Razorstrop Fungus, Polypore du bouleau, Birkenporling, Ny?rfa-tapl?, ny?rtapl?, Berkezwam. Bracket 10?20cm across, 2?6cm thick, subglobose at first, expanding to hoof-shaped often with a rudimentary stem, margin thick and rounded; upper surface with a thin separable skin, smooth, whitish when young darkening to fleshy grey-brown with age. Flesh white, rubbery. Taste slightly bitter, smell strong and pleasant. Tubes 1.5?5mm long, white. Pores 3?4 per mm, circular, white at first, later pale grey-brown. Spores cylindric to bean-shaped, 4.5?6 x 1.3?1.5um. Habitat on birch. Season all year, annual, although fruit bodies remain intact from one year into the next. Very common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Phyllotopsis nidulans (Fr.) Singer Nemezes narancsoslaska. Fruit body a laterally attached, bracket-like cap without a stem. Cap 3-8cm across, circular to kidney-shaped, margin inrolled when young; bright yellow-orange when young, then tawny buff, densely hairy surface. Gills narrow, rather crowded; bright orange-yellow. Flesh pale orange-buff. Odor sharp, very unpleasant. Taste sharp, very unpleasant. Spores sausage-like, smooth, 6-8 x 3-4?. Deposit pinkish. Habitat on fallen timber, often in overlapping clusters. Found in Europe and throughout most of North America. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Phellinus pini (Fr.) Ames. Feny-tapl- Pine Conk. Bracket 2-20cm across, 1-15cm thick; hoof-shaped, fan-shaped, or shelf-like; tawny to dark reddish brown or brownish black in age, with the margin often brighter; hard, crusty, rough or cracked, minutely hairy, generally curved. Tubes up to 6mm deep. Pores circular to angular; dingy yellow-tawny. Stem minute or none. Flesh tough; tawny to tan or ochre. Spores globose or subglobose, smooth, 4-6 x 3.5-5-. Deposit brown. Habitat singly or in rows on living or recently dead coniferous trunks. Common. Widely distributed in North America. Season perennial. Not edible. Comment A very destructive fungus that attacks the heartwood of living trees, resulting in "conk rot" causing more timber loss than any other fungus.
Inedible
Phallus impudicus Pers. syn. Ithyphallus impudicus (L.) Fr. Stinkhorn, Phallus Impudique, Satyre puant, Oeuf du diable, Gemeine Stinkmorchel, Erdei sz-m-rcs-g, Satirione, Grote Stinkzwam. Fruit body initially semi-submerged and covered by leaf-litter, egg-like, 3-6cm across, attached to substrate by a cord-like mycelial strand. The outer wall of the egg is white to pinkish but there is a thick gelatinous middle layer held between the membranous inner and outer layers. The egg is soon ruptured, as the white hollow stalk-like receptacle extends to 10-25cm high, the pendulous, bell-shaped head is covered by a meshwork of raised ribs covered in dark olive slime which contains the spores. This slime has a strong sickly offensive smell which attracts flies from large distances, the slime sticks to the legs of the flies and thus acts as a means of spore dispersal which takes place very rapidly, exposing the underlying mesh of the cap. Spores pale yellow, oblong, 3.5-4 x 1.5-2-. Habitat associated with rotting wood which may be buried in the soil, in gardens and woodland. Season summer to late autumn. Very common. The egg stage, which lacks the disgusting smell, is edible though not tasty; it is said to be an aphrodisiac presumably through association with its phallic shape. Distribution, America and Europe. The second picture was taken by Geoffrey Kibby. The latest one sent in from Australia does not look the same as the European species, mainly because of the scarlet colour, is there an Australian name for this fungus?
Inedible
Phaeolus schweinitzii (Fr.) Pat. syn. Polyporus schweinitzii Fr. Feny- likacsosgomba (tapl-). Fruit body sometimes forming amorphous cushions, more often subcircular, 10-30cm across with a short thick stalk, soft and spongy when fresh drying fragile and light; upper surface concave, rough, hairy, concentrically grooved at first, dark sulphur-yellow becoming rusty or dark brown and finally blackish with age. Stem brown, very short and thick, merging into the cap and covered in tubes. Flesh rusty brown, fibrous. Tubes 3-6mm long, decurrent, concolorous with the upper surface. Pores 0.3-2.5mm across, circular, angular or irregular, yellow, olivaceous or tinged rust, finally maroon brown, often glistening in the light. Spores whitish tinged yellowish, ovate to elliptic, 5.5-7.5 x 3.5-4um. Hyphal structure monomitic; generative hyphae lacking clamps. Habitat parasitic on conifers, usually arising from the roots. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Peniophora quercina (Fr.) Cke. Eichen-Rindenpilz T?lgyfa ter?l?gomba. Fruit body resupinate, forming ochraceous pink to purple grey patches 0.1?0.5mm thick which dry hard and brittle rolling away from the substrate and back on themselves to show the dark brown or black underside. Flesh relatively thick almost gelatinous, hyaline except for a narrow brownish zone adjacent to the substrate. Cystidia thick-walled, hyaline, fusiform, heavily encrusted with crystalline material, and often becoming buried as the hymenium thickens. Spores light red, curved cylindric, 8?12 x 3?4um. Habitat on dead branches of deciduous trees especially oak. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Paxillus panuoides (Fr.) Fr. syn. Tapinia panuoides Sutara Muschelkrempling Nyeletlen c?l?pgomba. Cap 1?6cm across, ochraceous to buff or fulvous, downy and often with lilac tomentum especially toward the point of attachment. Stem up to 10mm, entirely absent or rudimentary and lateral. Flesh ochraceous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills decurrent, crowded, branched and wavy, pale buff bruising darker. Spore print ochraceous rust. Spores ellipsoid, 4?5.5 x 3?4um. Habitat on conifer debris, causing the infected wood to become soft and discolour bright yellow. Season late summer to late autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Inedible
Panellus stypticus (Bull. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Panus stipticus (Bull. ex Fr.) Eichen Zwergkn?ueling Kis ?ld?csk?gomba Pane stiptique Bitter Oysterling. Note stypticus is also spelt stipticus by some authors. Cap 1?3cm across, kidney-shaped, pale ochre-brown to cinnamon, minutely scurfy. Stem 5?20 x 2?5mm, lateral, tapering towards the base, concolorous with cap or paler. Flesh whitish to pale yellowish. Taste bitter. Gills pale cinnamon. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, amyloid, 3?6 x 2?3um. Habitat often in crowded tiers on dead branches or stumps, especially of oak. Season all year. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Note the spelling of stipticus
Edible
Panellus serotinus (Schrad. ex Fr.) K?hn. syn. Pleurotus serotinus (Schrad. ex Fr.) Kummer Gelbstieliger Zwergkn?ueling S?rgat?nk? d?csk?gomba Olive Oysterling. Cap 3?7(15)cm across, kidney-shaped, ochre to olive-green, tacky in wet weather. Stem 10?25 x 8?15mm, lateral or rudimentary, yellowish covered in minute brownish scurfy scales. Flesh white with a gelatinous layer below the cap cuticle. Gills pale yellow to orange-yellow, fading with age. Pleuro- and cheilocystidia thin-walled, vesiculose-clavate, with yellowish contents. Spore print white. Spores curved cylindrical, amyloid 4?5.5 x 1?2um. Habitat on fallen trunks and branches. Season autumn to early winter. Uncommon. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Panellus mitis (Pers. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Pleurotus mitis (Pers. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Milder Zwergkn?ueling ?desk?s d?csk?gomba Elastic Oysterling. Cap 0.5?1.5cm across, fan-shaped, horizontal, white becoming clay-pink, pellicle separable. Stem 5?10?3?5mm, lateral, flattened, whitish covered in white mealy granules. Flesh white. Taste mild. Gills crowded, with gelatinous edge, white to cream. Spore print white. Spores cylindrical, amyloid, 3.5?5 x 1?1.5um. Habitat coniferous twigs. Season early autumn to early winter. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Panaeolus semiovatus (Sow. ex Fr.) Lund. syn. Anellaria separata (L. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. P. separatus (L. ex Fr.) Gillet Ring-D?ngerling Gy?r?s tr?gyagomba Egghead Mottlegill. Cap 2?6cm across, ovate-bell-shaped, never expanding, clay white tinged yellowish towards centre, viscid, drying shiny, velar remnants often adhering to margin. Stem 50?100 x 4?8mm, slightly thickened at base, whitish; ring white and membranaceous, persistent. Flesh whitish, yellowish in stem. Gills broad, whitish, soon brown-black, often with a white edge. Pleurocystidia in form of broad lanceolate chrysocystidia with pointed apices. Spore print black. Spores pip-shaped, 16?20 x 10?12um. Habitat on dung. Season spring to early winter. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Otidea onotica (Pers.) Fuckel syn. Peziza onotica Pers. ex Fr. Hare-s Ear, Oreille de li-vre, Oreille d--ne, Eselsohr, Orecchia d'asino, Varkensoor, Ny-lf-lgomba. Cup 2-6cm wide, 3-10cm high, lopsided, irregularly ear-shaped, attached to the substrate by a short, indistinct whitish stalk, inner surface ochraceous flushed pinkish, outer similarly coloured and slightly scurfy. Flesh thin, white. Asci 250 x 10-, not blued by iodine. Paraphyses slender, curved at tip. Spores broadly elliptical, containing two oil drops, 12-13 x 5-6-. Habitat in soil in deciduous or mixed woodland. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Otidea cochleata (L. ex St. Amans) Fuckel syn. O. umbrina (Pers.) Bres. Schnecken-?hrling Otid?e brun d'ombre, Brown Ear. Cap 3?6cm across, subsessile, split down one side, inner surface tan to dark brown, outer ochraceous-buff, slightly scurfy. Asci with tips not blued by iodine, 200?260 x 11?12?. Spores 16?18 x 7?8?. Habitat on bare earth or amongst sparse grass in deciduous or coniferous woodland. Season autumn. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Neobulgaria pura (Fr.) Petrak Beech Jellydisc B?kk koronggomba. Fruit body 0.5?2cm across, gregarious, subglobose at first with the margin inrolled showing the smooth exterior, becoming flattened on top or concave, flesh-coloured often with a violaceous tint, gelatinous. Asci 70 x 9?. Spores elliptical, containing two small oil drops, 6?9 x 3?4?. Habitat on logs and fallen branches especially beech. Season early summer to early winter. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mutinus caninus (Pers.) Fr. Dog Stinkhorn, Phallus de Chien, Satyre des cheins, Hundsrute, K-z-ns-ges kutyasz-m-rcs-g, Fallo canino, mutino canino, Kliene Stinkzwam, Kutyasz-m-rcs-g. Fruit body initially a semi-submerged eggs as in Phallus impudicus but much smaller, 1-2cm across and more cylindric in shape, whitish-yellow, finally rupturing when the hollow pitted receptacle extends. Stem 10-12cm high, pale yellow-buff to bright orange, surmounted by the narrow conical orange-red head covered in dark olive slime which contains the spores and has a very slight sickly smell. Spores pale yellow, oblong, 4-5 x 1.5-2-. Habitat in leaf litter in woods. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
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