Poisonous/suspect Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 417

Poisonous/Suspect
Clitocybula familia (Pk.) Singer Cap 1-4cm across, bell-shaped then convex becoming flatter, with an incurved margin that spreads and finally becomes torn in age; grayish buff to brownish buff or dirty cream; smooth, moist. Gills adnate to nearly free, crowded, narrow; ash gray to whitish. Stem 40-80 x 1.5-3mm, fragile, gray or whitish, with flat white hairs on the base; smooth with a fine bloom. Flesh thin, fragile. Taste slightly disagreeable. Spores globose, smooth, amyloid, 3.5-4.5 x 3.5-4.5-. Deposit white. Habitat in large clusters on conifer logs. Often abundant. Found widely distributed in North America. Season August-October. Said to be edible.
Poisonous/Suspect
Clitocybe nebularis (Batsch. ex Fr.) Kummer. Clouded Funnel or Clouded Agaric, Clitocybe n?buleux, Nebelkappe, Sz?rke t?lcs?rgomba, Agarico delle nebbie, Nevelzwam. Cap 5?C20cm across, convex at first becoming flattened or occasionally slightly depressed in the centre, the margin remaining inrolled, cloudy grey sometimes tinged with buff, darker at the centre and often covered with a white bloom. Stem 50?C100 x 15?C25mm, swollen towards the base, paler than the cap, fibrous and easily broken. Flesh thick, white, becoming hollow in the stem. Smell strong and sweetish. Gills decurrent, crowded, whitish later with a yellow flush. Spore print cream. Spores ovoid-elliptical, 5.5?C8 x 3.5?C5??. Habitat in deciduous or coniferous woods often in rings or troops. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Said to be edible but known to cause gastric upsets in many people. Distribution, America and Europe.C. nebularis var. alba differs only in the milk-white cap and be distinguished from other white fleshy Clitocybes by its relatively large spores. Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Clitocybe fragrans (Fr.) Kummer. Duftender Trichterling, Illatos t-lcs-rgomba, Slanke anijstrechterzwam, Fragrant Funnel. Cap 1.5-4cm across, flattened convex sometimes slightly depressed, with an inrolled margin becoming somewhat wavy in age; hygrophanous, pale yellowish brown when wet, whitish cream when dry, with a darker center; smooth, finely lined at the margin. Gills adnate to slightly decurrent, close, narrow to moderately broad; whitish buff. Stem 30-60 x 3-6mm, stuffed then hollow, often curved and slightly enlarged toward the base; whitish to pale-buff; silky with fine hairs on stem, felty with a few thin rhizoids at the base. Flesh thin, soft, pliant; whitish to buff. Odor of aniseed. Taste of aniseed. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, nonamyloid, 6.5-8 x 3.5-4-. Deposit white. Habitat growing either scattered, in groups, or in clusters under deciduous trees. Found in northeastern and northwestern North America and California. Season July-September (December in California). Edible but avoid due to possible confusion with similar dangerously poisonous species.
Poisonous/Suspect
Clitocybe ditopus (Fr. ex Fr.) Gillet syn. C. ditopoda Fr. Mehltrichterling, Kissp-r-s t-lcs-rgomba, Kleinsporige trechtzwamm, Mealy Frosted Funnel. Cap 2-4cm across, flattened-convex with depressed centre soon becoming infundibuliform, dark grey-brown drying paler, with a pale, almost white margin. Stem 25-40 x 4-8mm, grey-brown covered in long white cottony fibre towards the base. Flesh thin, brown, becoming hollow in the stem. Smell mealy. Gills adnate to slightly decurrent, rather crowded, dark grey. Spore print white. Spores subglobose, 3-3.5 x 2.5-3-. Habitat in conifer woods. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edibility unknown -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Clitocybe dilatata Pers. ex Karsten Cap 3-15cm across, convex becoming flat with a swollen umbo; an incurved margin becoming irregular, upturned, and wavy; often misshaped from overlapping; gray then whitish or chalky; dry, smooth, downy. Gills adnate to decurrent, close, narrow then broad; whitish to buff. Stem 50-125 x 5-20mm, solid becoming hollow, often curved, enlarged toward the base, which is often united with many others to form a large clump; white, bruising darker at base; finely felty and furrowed, sometimes minutely scaly toward the base. Flesh firm, thicker on the disc; watery gray to whitish. Odor none. Taste unpleasant. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, nonamyloid, 4.5-6.5 x 3-3.5?. Deposit white. Habitat in groups or dense clusters, often overlapping, along roads or in sandy soil or gravel. Found in the Pacific Northwest and California. Also in Europe. Season May-November. Poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Chlorophyllum molybdites (Mayer ex Fr.) Mass. Lepiota morganii (Pk.) Sacc. Green-gilled Lepiota. Cap 5-30cm across, hemispherical to broadly convex becoming flatter; whitish underneath, covered with thin layers of pale pinkish-buff volval tissue which breaks up into many small scales and patches as the cap expands; dry, smooth or minutely hairy below, with scales curling upward in age. Gills free, close, broad; whitish slowly becoming dirty gray-green or darker. Stem 50-250 x 8-25mm, sometimes enlarging toward the base; whitish, slowly becoming dingy gray; smooth. Veil membranous, large, white, leaving double edged, persistent pendant ring on the upper stalk. Flesh thick; white, discoloring dingy red when bruised. Odor faint and pungent or none. Taste mild or none. Spores ovoid or ellipsoid, smooth, thick-walled with small germ pore at tip, 8-13 x 6.5-8?. Deposit green. No pleurocystidia. Habitat often forming fairy rings on grassy places such as lawns, meadows, and wasteland. Found widely distributed in North America but very common in the Gulf Coast area and Colorado. Season July-September. Poisonous. Comment Many people have reported this mushroom as edible, but it definitely contains toxins. These may be reduced by boiling, which may account for some people's eating it without symptoms of vomiting, cramps, and diarrhea.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus vermiculosus Pk. Cap 5-10cm across, convex-flattened, deep brown to bay, reddish cinnamon, paler with age; subtomentose to deeply velvety, slightly tacky when wet. Tubes dull greenish yellow. Pores reddish brown, often very dark, bruising blue-black. Stem 40-80 x 10-25mm, equal, firm; surface a dull yellow covered overall with dark reddish-brown minute floccose squamules, bruising blue-black where handled. Flesh firm; yellow, then instantly blue when cut. Odor mild. Taste mild. Spores subfusiform, 10-13.5 x 4-5-. Deposit olive-brown. Habitat in beech woods. Rather uncommon (although much misidentified). Found in northern and eastern North America. Season July-August. Edibility not known.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus subluridellus Smith & Thiers Cap 5-10cm across, broadly convex; from deep blood red to vermilion or orange-red, dull brown when old, instantly deep blue when touched; velvety- tomentose. Tubes yellow bruising blue. Pores minute; deep carmine red, instantly bruising blue. Stem 40-90 x 15-25mm, equal; yellow ground color overlaid with red pruina, especially at base; extreme base with pale yellow tomentum; surface bruising deep blue. Flesh lemon yellow, blue when cut. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores subfusoid, smooth, 10.8-13(15) x (3.8)4-5.5-. Deposit olive. Habitat under oak. Frequent. Found in northeastern North America. Season July-September. Comment It lacks the red hairs at stem base found in the similar Boletus subvelutipes Pk. Edibility suspect, best avoided.
Poisonous/Suspect
Poisonous/Suspect
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus piedmontensis Grund & Smith New syn. Boletus firmus Cap 5-18cm across, convex becoming flatter; pinkish cinnamon to pinkish olive when older, sometimes grayish or pallid when young; dry, with a faint bloom, becoming smoother in age. Tubes 6-l0mm deep, moderated, depressed to depressed-decurrent; greenish yellow, blueing. Pores 2-4 per mm, subangular and round; deep red to orange-red with occasional patches of dark olive-brown in age, blueing when bruised. Stem 50-100 x 25-50mm, bulbous when young, equal in age; buff-yellow overlaid with rose red; reticulate at apex only, base with dull grayish tomentum. Flesh thick, firm; white with yellow patches, blue when cut. Odor pleasant. Taste mild to slightly bitter. Spores oblong to narrowly ellipsoid, 9-12.5 x 4-4.5?. Deposit light olive-green. Habitat under mixed hardwoods. Found in North Carolina. Season August-September. Not edible.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus leonis Reid Honiggelber R?hrling C?pe couleur de lion Boletus leonis Reid Cap 3?5cm, bright sienna or ochre becoming buff, surface covered in irregularly downy patches particularly at the centre, elsewhere smooth. Stem 30?75 x 90?135mm, with rooting base, cream at apex, more ochraceous below. Flesh cream, with lemon-yellow tinge towards stem base. Taste and smell not distinctive. Tubes greenish yellow or lemon yellow. Pores lemon chrome unchanging. Spore print ochraceous citrine. Spores subfusiform to ellipsoid, 9?13 x 4.5?5.5?. Habitat in parkland with oak. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility unknown. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus inedulis Murr. Cap 4-10cm across, convex to flattened; pale, whitish at first, then buff to tan; dry, subtomentose when young, often conspicuously areolate when old. Tubes pale greenish yellow, turning blue when cut. Pores small (1.5-2 per mm); pale yellow, blue on bruising. Stem 60-100 x 10-25mm, equal; yellow overall with a pink flush over base; surface reticulate over upper half, very fine and often almost smooth. Flesh firm; yellowish then pale blue when cut. Odor pleasant. Taste bitter. Spores subfusiform, 9-12 x 3.3-4.5?. Deposit olive-brown. Habitat in oak and hickory woods. Found in northeastern North America, west to Michigan and south to New York. Season July-September. Not edible. Comment It is often mistaken for Boletus calopus), from which it differs in its slender stature, finer reticulum, and small spores.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus illudens Pk. Cap 3-9cm across, convex to flattened; pale pinkish buff to cinnamon, brighter, more lemon yellow at margin; dry, velvety, then moist but not viscid. Tubes adnate-decurrent; honey yellow to olivaceous. Pores large, angular; lemon yellow, then brownish where bruised or old. Stem 30-90 x 6-12mm, tapered below; pale brownish above becoming yellowish to mustard yellow at base; usually with coarse ridges and wrinkles above, but not truly reticulate. Flesh pallid, mustard yellow in base and below stem cortex. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores subfusiform, 10-14 x 4-5-. Deposit olive-brown. Habitat in oak or mixed woods. Often common. Found in northeastern North America. Season July-September. Edible. Comment A drop of ammonia on the cap cuticle produces a deep green reaction; the similar Boletus subtomentosus and Boletus nancyae Smith & Thiers turn purple-brown with ammonia.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus frostii Russ. apud Frost Frost's Bolete Cap 5-15cm across, convex then flat; deep blood red with a white bloom at first, soon disappearing, margin of cap with a very narrow yellow zone; smooth, quite viscid at first, then tacky to dry. Tubes sunken around stem; yellow to yellow-green, bruising blue. Pores very fine; intense deep blood red to purple, with white bloom when young, fading to orange-red when old. Stem 40-120 x 15-25mm, equal to slightly clavate; colored as cap but with prominent raised network over entire surface, the ridges of the network yellow overlying the blood-red background. Flesh yellow, instantly turning blue when cut. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores fusiform, smooth, 11-15 x 4-5-. Deposit olive-brown. Habitat in oak woods. Often locally common. Found throughout eastern North America from the Great Lakes region to Florida. Season July-September. Edible but not recommended.
Poisonous/Suspect
Boletus flammans Dick & Snell Cap 4-12cm across, convex, sometimes irregular; deep red to red-brown, becoming deep rosy red to brick red with age, bruising blue; dry, subtomentose, viscid when wet. Tubes depressed around stem, 8-12mm deep; pale yellow. Pores small; bright red to carmine, blue when bruised. Stem 65-80 x 10-15mm, equal; with bright red reticulations on upper half, brownish red to yellowish below; smooth or longitudinally ridged below. Flesh pale yellow, rapidly blue when cut. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores subfusiform, 10-13 x 3.5-5-. Deposit olive-brown. Habitat under conifers. Found from Nova Scotia to Pennsylvania. Season July-September. Edibility not known- not advised.
Poisonous/Suspect
Poisonous/Suspect
Bolbitius reticulatus (Pers. Ex Fr.) Ricken Sz?rk?s k?r?szgomba. Cap 3-6cm across darker in the centre violet-grey with with a netted-veined appearance. Stem 5-6 cm long. Spores rusty brown 10-11x5-6um. Found on beech wood or stumps. Europe not recorded for America.
Poisonous/Suspect
Armillaria straminea (Krombh.) Kummer var. americana Mitchel & Smith Cap 4-18cm across, conical to convex, becoming umbonate then flat, with incurved, cottony margin that straightens in age; straw yellow fading to whitish with conspicuous, flattened, bright yellow or darker scales arranged in concentric circles; dry. Gills sinuate, close, broad; whitish then lemon yellow. Stem 50-125x 15-25mm, sometimes with a thick bulb; smooth and white above the ring, whitish with shaggy yellowish scales below. Veil partial veil leaving thick, yellowish, cottony ring on upper stalk. Taste mild. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, weakly amyloid, 6-8 x 4-5?. Deposit white. Habitat on the ground under aspen and in mixed woods. Often abundant. Found in the Pacific Northwest and the Rockies. Season July-October. Edibility not known. Comment There is also an albino form of this species.
Poisonous/Suspect
Armillaria gallica Marxm?ller & Romagnesi Syn. A. bulbosa and A. lutea Gum?s (s?rgapelyhes) tusk?gomba. Ricken Cap 3?15cm across, very variable, convex to shield shapped, yellow brown, tawny, to dark brown, often with an olivaceous tinge, covered in darker fibrillose scales especially at the centre. Stem 60?150?5?15mm, often bulbous towards the base, yellowish becoming reddish-brown at the base, initially with a thick whitish to yellow cottony ring. Flesh white. Taste astringent, smell strong. Gills white at first then yellowish becoming pinkish-brown and often darker spotted with age. Spore print pale cream. Spores elliptic, 8?9 x 5?6?. Habitat in clusters on or around trunks or stumps of deciduous and coniferous treesor shrubs. Season summer to early winter. Very common. Edible when cooked but should only be eaten in small amounts as some forms are known to cause stomach upsets. Distribution, America and Europe. The fungus spreads by long black cords called rhizomorphs resembling bootlaces which can be found beneath the bark of infected trees, on roots or in the soil where they can travel large distances to infect other trees. This is one of the most dangerous parasites of trees, causing an intensive white rot and ultimately death; there is no cure and the fungus is responsible for large losses of timber each year.
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