Poisonous/suspect Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
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Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 417

Poisonous/Suspect
Tricholoma ustale (Fr. ex Fr.) Kummer. Tricolome br?l?, Brandiger Ritterling, Szenesed? (feketed?) pereszke, Beukridderzwam, Burnt Knight. Cap 4?8cm across, convex then expanded, viscid in wet weather, chestnut brown, paler at margin, blackening with age. Stem 30?60 x 10?15mm, fibrous, reddish-brown, apex paler. Flesh whitish, sometimes reddening slightly. Taste slightly bitter, smell not distinctive. Gills white, becoming rust-spotted, edges blackening with age. Spore print white. Spores elliptic-ovate, 5.5?7 x 4?5um. Habitat deciduous woods, especially beech. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Tricholoma psammopus (Kalchbr.) Qu?l. Schwammiger Ritterling, V?r?sfeny? pereszke, Larix-ridderzwam, Larch Knight. Cap 3?8cm across, convex then expanded, yellowish-brown to pale tan. Stem 40?80 x 10?15mm, apex whitish, becoming densely covered in minute reddish-brown cottony scales towards the base. Flesh yellowish-brown. Taste bitter, smell none. Gills white at first then straw-yellow becoming rust-spotted. Spore print white. Spores 6?7 x 4?5um. Habitat under larch. Season autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Tricholoma pardinum Qu??l. P?rducpereszke (pereszke). Cap 5-15cm across, convex becoming flatter; whitish with pale-gray to dark-gray scales; dry with hairy scales. Gills notched or adnexed, close, moderately broad; whitish very occasionally flushed pinkish. Stem 50-150 x 10-20mm, firm, solid, sometimes enlarged at the base; white, sometimes tinged gray; dry, smooth. Flesh thick, firm; white. Odor mealy. Taste mealy. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, 8-10 x 5.5-6.5??. Deposit white. Habitat singly, scattered, or in groups on the ground in mixed and deciduous woods, especially under fir. Sporadically common and abundant, otherwise infrequent. Found in Europe and widely distributed in northern North America. Season August-October. Poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Tricholoma acerbum (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Tricolome acerbe, Gerippter Ritterling, Keser? pereszke, Agarico acerbo, Krulzoomridderzwam, Bitter Knight. Cap 7?12cm across, convex, margin strongly incurved, and usually ribbed, yellowish-buff to tan. Stem 30?70 x 20?30mm, bulbous and often pointed at base, apex covered in densely crowded minute yellowish granular scales, becoming yellowish-buff below. Flesh thick, white. Taste peppery and bitter, but sometimes mild, smell fruity. Gills crowded, whitish to yellowish at first becoming spotted reddish-brown. Spore print white. Spores subglobose to ovate. 4?6 x 3?4um. Habitat mixed woodland. Season autumn. Rare. Slightly poisonous although eaten in some places after parboiling; of poor quality. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia hornemannii (Fr.) Lundell Fenyves harmatgomba. Cap 6-15cm across, broadly convex umbonate; dull reddish brown or purple-brown, with white veil remnants at margin; very viscid when wet. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120x 10-20mm; white; strongly fibrillose-scaly below the prominent ring. Flesh white. Odor a little unpleasant. Taste a little unpleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-14 x 5.5-7?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on rotting conifer logs. Found in Europe and northern North America. Season August-November. Not edible- possibly poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia aeruginosa (Curt. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Verdigris Agaric, Strophaire vert-de-gris, Vert-de-gris, Gr?nspantr?uschling, Z?ld harmatgomba, Strofaria grigio-verde, Kopergroenezwam. Cap 2?8cm across, convex to bell-shaped then flattened and slightly umbonate, blue to blue-green from the gluten and flecked with white scales, becoming pale yellowish as this is lost. Stem 40?100 x 4?12mm, whitish to blue, apex smooth, covered in small whitish scales below the spreading membranous ring. Flesh whitish-blue. Smell none. Gills white then clay brown, often with a white edge. Cheilocystidia obtuse, clavate-capitate or lageniform capitate; lanceolate chrysocystidia found on gill face and only rarely on gill-edge. Spore print brownish-purple. Spores elliptic, 7?10 x 5um. Habitat woods, heaths and pastures. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Scleroderma cepa (Vaill.) Pers. Fruit body 1.5-9cm across, subglobose, flattened, or lobed; no stem or almost none, attached by a thick mass of tough, hairy mycelium. Peridium (outer skin) 1-3mm thick; when fresh, hard, quite tough; white in cross-section, becoming reddish or pinkish brown when cut. Surface whitish when young, becoming straw-colored to yellowish brown or leather brown, turning deep pinky-brown if rubbed; smooth becoming very finely cracked and scaly, especially on the top where exposed to light. Spore mass white and firm when young, soon becoming black or purple-black, then paler or browner and powdery. Odor none. Spores globose, spiny but not reticulate, 7-10 x 7-10-. Habitat singly, scattered, or in groups under deciduous and coniferous trees in woods, in gardens, and along roadsides. Common. Found widely distributed in North America. Season July-October. Poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Russula emetica (Schaeff. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray. Sickener, Emetic Russula, Russule -m-tique, Colombe rouge, Kirschroter Speit-ubling, H-nytat- galambgomba, Colombina rossa, rossetta, Berijpte russula. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, later flattening or with a shallow depression, scarlet, cherry or blood red, sometimes with ochre-tinted to white areas, somewhat thin-fleshed, fragile, shiny, sticky when moist; skin easily peeling to show pink to red coloured flesh beneath, margin often furrowed when old. Stem 40-90 x 7-20mm, white, cylindrical or more usually somewhat swollen towards the base, fragile. Flesh white, red immediately beneath cap cuticle. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed to free, cream then pale straw. Spore print whitish (A). Spores broadly ovoid; with large warts, 1.2- high, connected by fine lines to form a large-meshed, almost complete network, 9-11 x 7.5-8.5-. Cap cystidia mostly narrowly club-shaped with 0-1 septa. Habitat under pines. Season summer to late autumn. Common. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Ramaria formosa (Fr.) Qu?l. syn. Clavaria formosa Fr. Sch?ne Koralle Cifra korallgomba Clavaire ?l?gante. Fruit body 7?30cm high, 6?15cm wide, pinkish-ochraceous to orange-pink, lemon-yellow at tips of the numerous branches. Stem 30?60 x 25?60mm, whitish orange, itself much-branched. Flesh white or tinged orange-yellow, often bruising vinaceous to blackish. Taste bitter. Spores ochraceous, oblong, elliptic, roughened, 8?15 x 4?6?. Habitat in humus in woods, usually deciduous. Season autumn. Rare. Poisonous ? causes diarrhoea. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Phaeolepiota aurea (Matt. ex Fr.) Maire ex Konrad & Maublanc Aranys-rga t-kegomba. Cap 2-15cm across, obtuse to convex, becoming flatter with a central umbo and the margin often hung with veil remnants; orange-tan to golden brown; dry, granular to powdery. Gills adnate to free, close, broad; pale yellow becoming tawny to orange-brown. Stem 40-150 x 10-40mm expanded toward the base; orange to buff or similar to cap; smooth above the ring, powdery or granular below. Veil partial veil sheathing stalk; same color as cap; granular underneath, smooth above; leaving persistent flaring to drooping ring. Flesh thick; pale or yellowish. Spores ellipsoid, smooth to minutely roughened, 10-14 x 5-6-. Deposit yellowish brown to orange-buff. Habitat in groups or clusters on compost, rich soil, humus, or leaf litter under coniferous or deciduous trees. Quite rare but sometimes abundant. Found in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Season September-October. Not edible because it is mildly poisonous to some people. The field photograph was taken by Geoffrey Kibby.
Poisonous/Suspect
Paxillus involutus (Fr.) Fr. Brown Rollrim, Paxille enroul?, Kahler Krempling, Beg?ngy?ltsz?l? c?l?pgomba, Gewone krulzoom. Cap 5?12cm across, ochraceous or fulvous with olivaceous flush at first becoming more rusty-brown and finally hazel or snuff brown, viscid at centre when wet, downy throughout particularly at margin which remains inrolled, becoming smooth later. Stem up to 75 x 8?12mm, concolorous with cap becoming stained chestnut especially with age or on bruising. Flesh pale ochre in cap, fulvous in stem base, darkening on cutting. Taste acidic, smell fungusy. Gills decurrent, crowded, pale ochre then sienna, bruising vinaceous or chestnut. Spore print sienna. Spores ellipsoid, 8?10 x 5?6um. Habitat in broad-leaved woodland, especially with birch on acid heathland. Season late summer to late autumn. Very common. Deadly Poisonous ? After eating over a period it has been known to cause death. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Paxillus atrotomentosus (Fr.) Fr. Syn Tapinella atromentosus Sutara Samtfusskrempling B?rsonyost?nk? c?l?pgomba Paxille ? pied noir. Cap 12?28cm across, snuff-brown or sepia with sienna patches, depressed in the centre, margin inrolled, slightly downy. Stem 30?90 x 20?50mm, sometimes lateral, rooting, covered in a fine olivaceous buff down which becomes more coarse, velvety and dark brown with age. Flesh cream, ochre or buff in stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills crowded, joining to give a vein-like network near the stem. Spore print sienna. Spores ellipsoid, 5?6.5 x 3?4.5um. Habitat tufted on stumps of conifers, were it causes brown rot. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible, Suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Poisonous/Suspect
Omphalotus olearius (DC. ex Fr.) Sing. syns. Omphallotus illudens (Schw.) Bigelow, Clitocybe olearia (Fr. ex DC.) Maire Jack O'lantern, -lbaumpilz, Vil-g-t- t-lcs-rgomba, Clitocybe de l'olivier, Pleurote de l'olivier. Cap 5-10cm across, strongly depressed to funnel-shaped, bright orange. Stem 40-140 x 7-28mm, wavy and tapering towards the base, paler than cap. Flesh yellowish, darkening towards the stem base. Taste not distinctive, smell strong and unpleasant. Gills decurrent, golden to orange. Spore print white. Spores subglobose, 5-7-4.5-6.5m. Habitat on the roots or at the base of trunks of certain trees; oak and chestnut in Britain, frequently on olive in Europe. Season autumn. Distribution, Europe. Very rare. Poisonous. This fungus may be seen to glow in the dark, the phosphorescence coming from the gills when the spores are mature.
Poisonous/Suspect
Omphalotus illudens (Schw.) Bigelow Jack O'Lantern Vil-g-t- t-lcs-rgomba. Cap 5-20cm across, convex then soon flattened and then funnel-shaped with incurved margin; a brilliant and intense yellow-orange in color; smooth. Gills decurrent, crowded; bright yellow-orange. Stem 50-200 x 10-20mm, tapered at base, solid; colored as cap but darkening at base; smooth. Flesh firm; pale orange. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores globose, 3.5-5 x 3.5-5-. Deposit pale cream. Habitat often in enormous clusters at base of stumps or on buried roots (the latter is very common in gardens and lawns) of oaks and some other deciduous trees. Common. Found throughout much of North America, particularly the eastern United States. Season July-September but sometimes to November. Poisonous but usually not fatal, typically causing gastric upset for some hours or even days. Comment When fresh the gills of this species glow a bright greenish yellow in the dark. Based upon cultural evidence, this may be the same as Omphalotus olearius (DC ex Fr.) Singer of southern Europe, which name would then take precedence. On the West Coast the species Omphalotus olivascens Bigelow, Miller & Thiers is found, which differs in its duller brownish-orange to olivaceous cap and larger spores. It is also poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Leucocortinarius bulbiger (Alb. & Schw. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Armillaria bulbigera (Alb. & Schw. ex Fr.) Kummer Knolliger Schleierritterling Gum-s pereszke Leucocortinaire bulbeux White Webcap. Cap 5-9cm across, convex, pale clay-brown, sometimes with debris of veil leaving brownish cobwebby patches, especially near the margin. Stem 50-100 x 10-12mm, base swollen into a large flattened bulb 25-30mm across, whitish, the remains of the cobwebby veil leaving a distinct ring zone. Flesh white, becoming pale clay in the stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills white at first becoming cream to pale clay, never rust. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptic, 7-9 x 4-5um. Habitat with conifers. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility suspect -avoid. Found In Europe. Note the curved appearance of my specimens is caused by them expanding lying down in a box after I collected them.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lepiota crostata Kummer. L?piote cr?t?e, L?piote cr?pe, Kleiner Stinkschirmling, B?d?s ?zl?bgomba, Lepiota crestata, Stinkparasolzwam, Stinking Dapperling. Cap 2?5cm across, irregularly bell-shaped and umbonate, cuticle reddish-brown and soon broken up, except at centre, into small scales on a white silky background. Stem 20?35 x 3?4mm, white tinged flesh-colour; ring membranous and deciduous. Flesh thin, white. Taste pleasant, smell unpleasant, strongly fungusy. Gills white, becoming brownish with age. Spore print white. Spores bullet-shaped, dextrinoid, 6?7.5 x 3?3.5um. Habitat in woods, garden refuse or in leaf litter. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Edibility suspect ? avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. The collection on the blue background was made in America, but differs from European material in the much longer stem.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius uvidus (Fr.) Fr. Cap 3-l0cm across, flatly convex with a small umbo and incurved margin, becoming flatter with a broad depression and an arched or irregular margin; very pale fawn, lilac, buff, or violet-gray, becoming a little darker in age; smooth, sticky or slimy if very wet. Gills adnate to decurrent, close, moderately broad; creamy white, bruising dull lilac to tan. Stem 30-70 x 10-l6mm, becoming hollow; dirty white to pale, dull buff, staining rusty or yellow-brown at the base; smooth, slimy when young, shiny when dry. Flesh whitish staining dull lilac to pinky-brown. Latex milk-white becoming dingy cream, staining broken surfaces dull lilac. Odor typical. Taste mild becoming slightly bitter then faintly acrid. Spores oval, amyloid, 8-11 x 7-8.5-; ornamented with widely spaced bands and ridges and isolated particles, no reticulum, prominences 0.5-1- high. Deposit pale yellow. Habitat scattered to gregarious on low ground under mixed aspen, birch, and pine. Quite common. Found widely distributed in northeastern North America, west to Colorado. Season July-October. Not edible-probably poisonous
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius torminosus (Schaeff. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray. Woolly Milkcap, Lactaire ? toison, Wolliger Milchling, Birkenreizker, Ny?rfa sz?rgomba, v?r?sbolyhos tejel?gomba, Peveraccio delle coliche, lappacendro malefico, Baardige melkzwam. Cap 4?12cm across, convex becoming funnel-shaped, margin inrolled and hairy, pale salmon buff to pale pink with deeper-coloured indistinct concentric bands. Stem 40?80 x 10?20mm, pale flesh-coloured to salmon, finely downy. Flesh white, soon hollow in stem. Gills slightly decurrent, narrow, pale flesh-coloured to pale salmon. Milk white; taste hot and acrid. Spore print yellowish-cream (C?D) with faint salmon tint. Spores oval with low warts connected by ridges forming a very incomplete network, 7.5?10 x 6?7.5 μ. Habitat woods and heaths, usually with birch. Season late summer to early autumn. Frequent. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius chrysorrheus Fr. Goldfl-ssiger Milchling, S-rgatej- tejel-gomba, Lactaire - lait jaune, Yellowdrop Milkcap. Cap 3-8cm across, convex with a funnel-shaped depression, pale salmon to rosy or ochre-buff with darker rings of watery blotches or narrow concentric bands, smooth, margin hairless, incurved at first then straightening. Stem 30-80 x 9-20mm, cylindrical or with a slightly swollen base, whitish to pale buff, often flushed pinkish below. Flesh pallid to whitish becoming sulphur yellow from the milk, stem hollow. Gills decurrent, crowded, buff tinged pink. Milk white, abundant, becoming sulphur yellow in five to fifteen seconds; taste slowly bitterish and somewhat hot. Spore print creamy white (A+) with slight salmon tinge. Spores oval with an incomplete network of ridges, 7-8.5 x 6-6.5-. Habitat with oak in Europe, in groups in hardwood and mixed forests and under conifers in North America. Season summer to autumn. Occasional Europe. Widely distributed throughout North America. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Inocybe umbrina Bres. syn. Astrosporina umbrina (Bres.) Rea. B?scheliger Risspilz. Cap 1.5?4cm across, bell-shaped with prominent umbo, umber or chestnut brown initially covered by a greyish veil. Stem 30?50 x 3?5mm, whitish at apex and bulb, concolorous with cap below. Flesh whitish turning brown in stem. Taste mild, smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, pale clay. Cystidia thick-walled, fusoid with apical encrustation. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores oblong with slight protuberances, 7?8 x 5?6?. Habitat in coniferous and deciduous woods. Occasional. Not edible most Inocybes have been found to contain toxins. Found In Europe.
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