Polyporaceae Mushrooms identifications

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Total mushrooms fount: 3

Edible
Polyporus squamosus aka Cerioporus squamosus (yet to be confirmed new taxonomy) is a basidiomycete bracket fungus, with common names including dryad's saddle and pheasant's back mushroom.[2] It has a widespread distribution, being found in North America, Australia, Asia, and Europe, where it causes a white rot in the heartwood of living and dead hardwood trees. The name "dryad's saddle" refers to creatures in Greek mythology called dryads who could conceivably fit and ride on this mushroom, whereas the pheasant's back analogy derives from the pattern of colors on the bracket matching that of a pheasant's back. When planting season comes around and I cannot find morels, I am always pleased to find some dryad's saddle to collect. It's been much maligned as an edible of little value but I beg to fluctuate. It is everything regarding finding out how to pick and make it. Cover (pileus) 2-12 in wide-ranging round to kidney or supporter shaped, thick, overlapping on deceased solid wood often. Brown with scales that look much like feathers. Hence the titles pheasant backside and hawk's wing. The aroma is very distinctive smelling much like watermelon rind. Pleasant really! I've seen them referred to as "mealy" but that isn't how they remain here. Skin pores (hymenophore) Actually pipes that are small initially becoming quite large and angular jogging down the stem relatively. Whitish to yellowish tan. Stem (stipe) Very brief 3/4 2 in. mounted on the wood. Flesh White and non bruising. Spores White spore print out. That one makes one of the prettiest spore images of any mushroom I've printed. When and how to locate them (ecology) These increase on various very useless hardwoods (especially elm) largely in-may or June but once in a while later. A tree resting on the floor is your very best bet. Once in a while the may be on a full time income tree nevertheless they appear to favor very dead hardwood. Wet areas seem to be to create more. They are quite common and one of just a few reasonable edibles you will see at the moment of year. It really is nice to find when morel hunting is irritating. These will be within the same places each full season before solid wood is used. These have been called edible by some and poor by others just. They could be quite good though. My guidelines are that they have to be young, the pore level must be very skinny (1/16 in. or less may very well be good), & most importantly your blade needs to have the ability to go through it quickly. Long lasting blade reductions may very well be good easily. Sometimes just the outer edges are usable but nice tender ones are available. Preparation Once you've found sensitive specimens, they are really best prepared straightaway. Like a great many other wild mushrooms the aroma is ephemeral often disappearing within hours. Tempura frying will retain a few of this "watermelon" character. Saut?skillet or ing frying is an excellent way too. Slice them thin and cook them solid. Overcooking shall create toughness. I've tried drying them. They turn out as very white, crunchy potato chips that are pleasurable to eat dried. They maintained more of this unique smell than I expected. I've made a natural powder with them but have not attempted baking with it yet but it appears and smells good. The microwave produced something you will make shoes with. I've had very good luck with hard ones though. I cooked properly them and put them in the blender with poultry stock mixing until these were the consistency of the smoothie and then made mushroom soup. Really very good rather than like any other. Nothing else tastes or has the aroma of this mushroom. It is very good when prepared effectively really. I possibly could identify it by the smell with my eye shut down easily. Maybe it could taste "mealy" if it was stored in the refrigerator for two days. Actually, since differing people understand smell and flavour your experience could vary diversely. Comments Within the spring, that one is quite typical. Many you shall find are very leathery as well as your blade will won't trim it. Let it be just. Spring polypore (Polyporus arcularius) and Polyporus alveolaris look similar to it but are much smaller and incredibly tough.
Inedible
The top surface of the cap shows typical concentric zones of different colours. The flesh is 1–3 mm thick and has leathery texture. Older specimens, such as the one pictured, can have zones with green algae growing on them, thus appearing green. It commonly grows in tiled layers. The cap is rust-brown or darker brown, sometimes with blackish zones. The cap is flat, up to 8 x 5 x 0.5–1 cm in area. It is often triangular or round, with zones of fine hairs. The pore surface is whitish to light brown, pores round and with age twisted and labyrinthine. 2-5 pores per millimeter.
Inedible
Polyporus lepideus is a fungus which was described by Fr. 1818. Polyporus lepideus included in the genus Polyporus and family Polyporaceae. Cap up to 15 cm. Circular, or funneled. Scaly, dry cuticle brown variable. Tubes decurrent, whitish. Large, circular pores creamy white. Short step, up to 4 cm - yellowish or reddish brown. Tough, leathery, whitish flesh. Has large, Visible pores. Grows in winter. Normal seasoning Spring