Other Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 23

Inedible
Inonotus hispidus (Bull. ex Fr.) Karst. Pelzporling, Almafa rozsd?stapl? (tapl?) Polypore h?ris?e, Shaggy Bracket. Habitat: Commonly between 10-20ft on the trunks of ash, but seen on walnut sometimes, london and apple plane. Strategy: Parasitic creating simultaneous white rot. Value: Brittle fracture at point of decay. The probability of standing timber being created is wonderful for biodiversity Annual bracket ranging from: 6 to 25 cm across 4 to 12 cm wide 2 to 10 cm thick Fan-shaped, usually single but occasionally fusing with others into overlapping groups, surface felty-hairy varying from ochraceous to tobacco-brown, finally blackish and bristly. Red to brown and like velvet on top and usually growing independently. The bracket will blacken with age and finally drop off within the year, remaining on the ground below the tree for a long time. Spores exuded from red to brown pores. Tubes 10-20(50)mm long. Pores 2 - 3 per mm, circular to angular, pale ochraceous at first, later brown and glancing in the light. Spores rust, subglobose, 9?12?4?10m. Habitat usually on ash but commonly on other trees such as elm, apple and walnut. Season summer but persisting on the tree in blackened state throughout the year, annual ( Seen in October ). Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Choice
Morchella esculenta Pers. ex St. Amans Speisemorchel, ?zletes kucsmagomba, Morille comestible, Morel. Fruit body 6?20cm high, very variable, fertile head round to ovoid or obtusely conical, pale yellowish-brown darkening and browning with age, ridges acute and forming an irregular honeycomb around the angular pits; stalk minutely scurfy, slightly swollen at the base and longitudinally furrowed, whitish to ochraceous cream. Asci 330 x 20?. Spores cream, broadly elliptical, 16?19 x 8.5?11?. Habitat in open scrub or woodland or on waste ground. Season late spring. Uncommon. Edible ? excellent. Distribution, America and Europe. Several forms are recognized in Europe; var. rotunda has a roundish ochre-yellow fertile head, while that of var. crassipes is grey-brown and the stalk granular and much swollen at the base; var. umbrina is smaller then the type with a dark greyish-black fertile head. Note in north America there are forms of Morchella esculenta growing under Hickoties, Elms and Tulip Trees, they are normally smaller and rather tall and narrow, I have encluded them here, but one day they may be described as different varieties.
Inedible
Diatrype disciformis (Hoff. ex Fr.) Fr. Hoekig schorsschijfje, Sarkos k?regt?r?gomba, Beech Barkspot. Fruit body 1?3mm across, discoid, whitish at first soon blackish on the outer surface, remaining white-fleshed. Asci elongate club-shaped, 5? wide. Spores curved, cylindrical, 5?8?1.5?2?. Habitat on dead branches of deciduous trees, usually beech, emerging from below the bark. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Cortinarius) bolaris (Pers. ex Fr.) Fr. Rotschuppiger Dickfuss V?r?spikkelyes p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire teint en rouge Dappled Webcap Cap 3?5cm across, convex, covered in tiny adpressed pinkish to brick-red scales on a paler white, yellowish or reddish ground. Stem 25?40 x 12?20mm, whitish at the apex, covered in tiny fibrous reddish scales below, and bruising reddish or red-brown like cap; arising from orange-red mycelium. Flesh white in cap, ochraceous or yellowish in stem, becoming sulphur-yellow especially in stem base when cut, finally deep red or red-brown. Smell none or faint and pleasant. Gills pale yellowish-cream, later pallid cinnamon. Spore print rusty cinnamon. Spores broadly ovate to subglobose, punctate rough, 6?7.5 x 4.5?5.5?. Habitat deciduous woods, especially beech. Season late summer to late autumn. Uncommon. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius anomalus (Fr. ex Fr.) Fr. Unregelm?ssiger Dickfuss Lil?s p?kh?l?sgomba, az?r p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire anormal Cortinarius (Sericeocybe) lepidopus Cke. syn. C. anomalus f. lepidopus (Cke.) K?hn & Romagn. Cap 2.5?7cm across, convex then expanded, dingy ochraceous flushed reddish-brown later umber to date-brown, sometimes tinged violaceous near margin especially when young. Stem 50?80 X 4?12mm, slightly thickened at base, tinged violaceous at apex, whitish-ochre below, covered in bands of yellowish scales from the veil. Flesh whitish, tinged violaceous at stem apex and ochraceous in stem base. Smell faint, pleasant. Gills violaceous then tinged clay finally ochre-rust. Spore print rust. Spores broadly ovate to subglobose, minutely roughened, 6.5?8.5 x 5.5?7?. Habitat deciduous and coniferous woods especially with birch and pine. Season autumn. Occasional. Edibility suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. Note We have sunk C. lepidopus within C anomalus.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Sericeocybe) alboviolaceus (Pers. ex Fr.) Fr. Weissvioletter Dickfuss Lil?sfeh?r p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire blanc et violet Pearly Webcap Cap 3?9cm across, convex to bell-shaped then expanded and umbonate, margin often splitting with age, bluish-white to pale violaceous discolouring pallid to ochraceous, covered in pale bluish-violet or whitish silky veil at first. Stem 80?100 x 10?18mm, swollen towards the base, concolorous with cap, apex deep violaceous discolouring pallid to ochraceous from base up; cortina white. Flesh pale violaceous, deeper in stem apex, later pallid in stem base. Taste of radish, smell faint, pleasant. Gills violaceous at first then tinged clay, finally rusty. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic, minutely rough, 8?10 x 5?6?. Habitat deciduous woods. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edibility suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Amanita citrina (Schaeff.) S. F. syn. A. mappa (Batsch ex Lasch) Qu?l. Gray. False Death Cap, Amanite citrine, Oronge citrine, Gelber Knollenbl?tterpilz, Tignosa paglierina, Gele knolamaniet, Citromgal?ca (gal?ca). Cap 4?10cm across, ivory to pale lemon especially near the centre, covered in persistent coarse whitish patches which discolour ochre-brown. Stem 60?80?8?12mm, ivory white, tapering and longitudinally lined above the membranous ring, the large basal bulb encased in the remains of the volva which creates a trough around the stem. Flesh white, the stem becoming hollow in older specimens. Taste unpleasant, smelling strongly of raw potatoes. Gills adnexed, whitish. Spore print white. Spores almost spherical, amyloid, 9.5 x 7.5?. Habitat in deciduous or coniferous woods, especially with beech. Season summer to late autumn. Frequent. Inedible possibly poisonous, of no interest as the strong taste and smell make it unpleasant, and to be avoided due to possible confusion with the deadly A. phalloides. Distribution, America and Europe. The earlier start date for fungus names possibly means that Amanita citrina needs to be called A. bulbosa var. citrina, but it to be hoped that a name in such common usage may be left unchanged.Amanita citrina var. alba White False Deathcap Amanita citrina var. alba (Gillet) Gilbert This is a frequently occurring form of A. citrina which differs only in being white throughout. Less strongly smelling than A. citrina, but still disagreeable to taste, inedible to be avoided easily confused with the deadly Amanitas. Distribution, Europe and possibly America . Comment Amanita citrina vat. lavendula Coker (as A. mappa) differs in its flush of lavender, in the universal veil, and sometimes in the streaks on the cap and is probably a distinct species in its own right. (North America).
Inedible
Russula montana Schaef. Cap 3.5-7cm across, convex-flattened, margin rarely striate; deep red to grayish red or reddish brown, sometimes with discolored areas; smooth; cuticle peels up to two-thirds cap radius. Gills fairly close, fragile; white. Stem 25-50 x 10-35mm, equal to clavate; white. Flesh soft; white. Odor none or slightly fruity. Taste strongly acrid. Spores subglucose, 7-10 x 6-8-; warts up to 0.4- high, with more or less complete reticulum. Deposit white to slightly cream (A-B). Habitat under conifers. Found in Colorado. Season July-August. Not edible. Comment Similar to Russula silvicola in the eastern states, but differing in its duller gray-red to brown-red cap
Edible
Russula modesta Pk. Cap 3-10cm across, convex then flat to slightly convex, slightly striate at margin when mature; pale grayish green, olive, or olive-buff; dry, dull, usually densely pruinose; cuticle peeling one quarter to one-half. Gills adnate, crowded to slightly spaced; pale buff. Stem 25-60 x 10-25mm, equal; white; dry. Flesh solid then spongy; white. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores ovoid, 6-7(8.5) x 4.5-6(6.8)-.; warts up to 0.8- high, isolated or with a very partial reticulum. Deposit cream (B-C). Habitat often gregarious under mixed woods. Found in New England and southward to West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee. Season July-September. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous)
Edible
Russula humidicola Burlingham. Cap 3-6cm across, soon depressed at center, margin soon striate- tuberculate; salmon, reddish yellow, to darker red at center; glabrous, viscid when wet; cuticle peeling almost entirely. Gills close, narrow; pale cream. Stem 30-50 x 5-10mm; white. Flesh spongy; white. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores ovoid, 7-8 x 5.5-6.5-; warts 0.4-10- high, with almost full reticulum. Deposit medium yellow (E-F). Habitat in mixed woods. Uncommon. Found in eastern North America. Season July-September. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous)
Inedible
Russula gracilis Burlingham. Cap 3-6cm across, soon flattened-depressed; pale lilac rose to salmon, mixed with pale greenish gray or buff; viscid when wet; cuticle separable almost to center. Gills rather close; cream-buff. Stem 30-50 x 8-20mm, equal; white or rarely tinted pink. Flesh soft; white. Odor pleasant. Taste acrid. Spores ellipsoid, 7.5-9 x 6-7?; warts 0.3-0.5? high, isolated or with a few connectives. Deposit medium ochre (D-E). Habitat in wet, boggy areas in mixed woods. Fairly common. Found in eastern North America. Season July-September. Not edible.
Inedible
Russula earlei Pk. Cap 4-10cm across, soon flattened-depressed, often irregular in outline, margin slightly striate when old; pale straw yellow to ochre-tan; smooth, viscid when wet, waxy; cuticle peels to one-quarter. Gills adnate, widely spaced, thick, almost waxy; pale yellow. Stem 25-40 x 5-15mm, equal, spongy within; yellowish; smooth. Flesh pale yellow. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores small, subglobose, 6-7 x 4-5-; warts isolated, minute, usually less than 0.25- high. Deposit white (A). Habitat usually under mixed deciduous trees. Apparently quite common in eastern states but rarely reported. Season August - September. Edibility not known-not recommended. Comment This species is remarkable in appearance, looking like a cross between a Hygrophorus and a Lactarius, very little like a russula. It is the only member of the primitive group the Archaeinae found in the United States; other members are from Africa and Madagascar.
Edible
Morchella steppicola Zer. Pusztai kucsmagomba. Described by Zerova. The stem tends to be more chunky than M. esculenta with multiple holes or crevises, spotted with granules that become more prominent with age. Originally described from the Ukrain, but is also frequently found in Hungary. Dr Bartho Lor?nd took these pictures and sent them to me.
Inedible
Lactarius pseudomucidus Smith & Hesler. Cap 4-10cm across, flatly convex becoming shallowly depressed to broadly funnel-shaped, with an inrolled margin that becomes wavy; dark charcoal brown; smooth and very slimy. Gills adnate to decurrent, close to subdistant, narrow to quite broad; white with a blue-gray tinge, spotting yellowish to brown in age. Stem 40-100 x 5-12mm, hollow, very fragile, enlarging toward base; dingy brown or gray on surface and paler within; very slimy when fresh. Flesh thin, limber; grayish. Latex thin, milk-white, changing very slowly, spotting gills yellowish to brown. Odor slight. Taste slowly, increasingly acrid. Spores broadly ellipsoid, amyloid, 7-9 x 6-7?; ornamented with heavy bands with branches forming a virtually distinct reticulum, prominences 0.5-1.2?, high. Deposit white. Habitat singly or gregarious under conifers. Common. Found widely distributed in the Pacific Northwest. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Inonotus radiatus (Sow. ex Fr.) Karst. Strahliger Schillerporling, R?ncos rozsd?stapl?, ?gerfa rozsd?s-tapl? Polypore radi?, Alder Bracket Inonotus radiatus (Sow. ex Fr.) Karst. Bracket 2?9cm across, 1?6cm wide, 1?2cm thick, in tiers, woody; upper surface becoming glabrous, uneven and radially wrinkled, apricot at first then rusty, finally almost black, margin paler, thin and acute. Flesh rusty brown, woody. Taste bitter, smell faint and sweet. Tubes 3?8mm long, rusty-brown. Pores 3?4 per mm, circular or angular, glancing silvery in the light. Spores yellowish, ellipsoid, 4.5?6?3?4.5m. Hyphal structure monomitic; generative hyphae lacking clamps. Setae in tubes, thick-walled, dark brown, fusiform with curved pointed apex. Habitat parasitic on alder and occasionally certain other deciduous trees. Season all year, annual but often persisting in old blackened state throughout the year. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Telamonia) evernius Fr. Violetter Rettichg?rtelfuss Lilat?nk? p?kh?l?sgomba. Cap 3?9cm across, conical to bell-shaped than expanded and obtusely umbonate, very hygorphanous, purplish umber-brown when damp drying reddish-ochre, becoming pale tawny beige with age. Stem 70?150 x 10?15mm, violaceous covered in whitish bands of velar remains. Flesh concolorous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills violaceous at first then pale clay, finally cinnamon. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic, 8.5?10 x 5?6?. Habitat conifer woods. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility Suspect ?avoid as many Cortinarius contain toxins. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius crassus Fr. sensu Smith subgenus Phlegmacium Vastagh?s? p?kh?l?sgomba. Cap 10-20cm across, slightly convex or flat; buff-colored then cinnamon brown; soon dry, smooth. Gills adnexed; pallid buff at first, then cinnamon brown. Stem 50-80 x 15-40mm, equal; whitish; fibrillose. Flesh off-white with brownish areas. Odor slight. Taste mild. Spores lemon-shaped, lightly roughened, 10-11.6 x 6-6.7?, quotient 1.7. Deposit rusty brown. Habitat under conifers and possibly maple. Found in the Pacific Northwest, in Colorado and other parts of the Rockies, and in the Great Lakes region. Season August-October. Not edible. Comment The flesh goes yellow with KOH. I could not see cheilocystidia nor could Smith, but in Europe cheilocystidia (albeit looking like basidia) are found.
Poisonous/Suspect
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