Pore material cannot be seperated from flesh of the cap Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 47

Inedible
Polyporus radicatus Schw. Cap 3.5-25cm across, circular, convex to sunken; yellowish brown to soot brown; dry, velvety to scurfy. Tubes 1-5mm deep, decurrent. Pores 2-3 per mm, angular; whitish to yellowish. Stem 60-140 x 5-25mm, central, with a long black rooting base; dingy yellow; scurfy to slightly scaly. Flesh white, dense. Spores ovoid to ellipsoid, smooth, 12-15 x 6-8-. Deposit white. Habitat usually singly on the ground around stumps or attached to buried roots. Not common. Found in central and eastern North America. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Polyporus floccipes Rostk. syn. P. squamosus f. coronatus (Rostk.) Pil?t syn. P. lentus Berk. Z?her Porling Olaszgomba. Cap 2?10(15)cm across, semicircular or circular, depressed above the point of attachment to the stem, yellow-cream to light cinnamon covered in hairy scales with darkening tips, thick and fleshy. Stem 5?60 x 5?15mm, lateral, off-centre or central, pallid, covered at the base in bundles of stiff white cottony hairs. Flesh white. Tubes very short, decurrent far down the stem, pallid to ochraceous-cream. Pores 2?2.5 x 1?1.5mm, polygonal or longitudinal, ochraceous-cream. Spores hyaline, ellipsoid-cylindric, 9?14 x 4?5.5um. Hyphal structure dimitic with generative and binding hyphae; generative hyphae with clamp-connections. Habitat on fallen twigs of deciduous trees. Season spring. Uncommon. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Polyporus ciliatus Fr. ex Fr. Maiporling Tavaszi likacsosgomba Fringed Polypore. Cap 1-12cm across, convex and centrally depressed, often wavy and rolled under at the margin, grey-brown, rusty or tobacco brown, surface glabrous or minutely bristly, especially at the margin. Stem 20-40 x 2-7mm, usually central, often curved and thickened at the base, yellow-brown or tawny. Flesh white, leathery. Tubes 0.5-2mm long, slightly decurrent, whitish at first later pallid or tan. Pores 4-6 per mm, circular, white to cream. Spores white, subcylindric, 5-6 x 1.5-2.5um. Hyphal structure dimitic with generative and binding hyphae; generative hyphae with clamp-connections. Habitat dead wood of deciduous trees, usually on logs and fallen branches. Season early spring to summer, annual. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe. Der Winter-Porling P. brumalis Pers. ex Fr., previously thought to be more common then P. ciliatus, is readily distinguished by having larger circular pores which elongate with age. Found In Europe, yet to be confirmed from America.
Inedible
Polyporus alveolaris (DC ex Fr.) Bond. & Singer syn. Favolus alveolaris (DC ex Fr.) Qu?l. Sugaras likacsosgomba (tapl?). Fruit body annual; often with a short lateral stem. Cap 1-9cm across, semicircular to ovoid; pallid reddish yellow; scaly at first. Pores rather large (0.5-3mm across), hexagonal; white or dull creamy; decurrent down the stem. Tubes up to 5mm deep; whitish tan. Stem lateral, short or absent, about l0mm long; colored like the pores. Flesh white. Spores cylindrical, smooth, 9-11 x 3-3.5?. Deposit white. Habitat on dead wood of deciduous trees. Found in Europe and throughout most of North America. Season May-August, sometimes later. Edible but tough.
Inedible
Phellinus nigricans (Fr.) Karsten Bracket 4-14cm across, 2-9cm wide, 2-6cm thick at base, semicircular to elongated, triangular in section; zones of whitish, gray, or light cinnamon and concentrically grooved black zones; with a distinct crust, except on the margin, old parts deeply cracked, base often mossy. Tubes up to 5cm deep in layers; cinnamon to rusty brown, or filled with white mycelium in old parts. Pores 5-6 per mm, round; cinnamon to deep rusty brown or gray when weathered. No stem. Flesh up to l0mm thick, dense; rusty brown. Spores globose to subglobose, smooth, nonamyloid, 6-7 x 5.5-6.5-. Habitat on deciduous wood, especially beech. Found in northern North America. Season perennial. Not edible.
Inedible
Phellinus igniarius (L. ex Fr.) Qu-l. syn. Fomes igniarius (L. ex Fr.) Gill. Gemeiner Feuerschwamm, Par-zstapl- (tapl-), Faux amadouvier, Tinder Box Fungus, Willow Bracket. Bracket 10-40cm across, 2-8cm wide, 5-20cm thick, hoof-shaped, very hard and woody; concentrically ridged, rusty brown when young later grey and finally black with the surface becoming cracked; margin obtuse, long-remaining rusty brown and velvety. Flesh rusty brown, hard. Taste sour or bitter, smell fungusy. Tubes 3-5mm long in each annual layer, rusty-brown. Pores 4-6 per mm, circular, rusty-cinnamon to maroon. Spores white, more or less globose, 4.5 x 6.5 x 4-5um. Setae thick-walled, very dark brown, fusoid with acute apex. Habitat parasitic on deciduous trees, especially willow, causing intensive white rot. Season sporulating from spring to late autumn, perennial. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Phellinus ferruginosus (Fr.) Pat. Fruit body 4-15cm across, 0.5-1.5cm thick, growing closely attached to the wood, spreading widely and irregularly with little swellings along the margin; cinnamon to rusty brown; leathery and flexible. Tubes 1-3mm deep in each layer, up to l0mm in total; tawny or umber-brown. Pores 5-6 per mm, round and entire on horizontal parts, split elsewhere; surface even, with little swellings or slightly wavy; tawny to umber-brown with yellowish-brown margin in growing specimens. No stem. Flesh irregular, thickness up to 5mm, loose, cottony; cinnamon to rusty brown. Spores broadly ellipsoid, nonamyloid, 4-5 x 3-3.5-. Habitat on dead hardwoods. Found in northern North America. Season annual to perennial. Not edible.
Inedible
Phellinus chrysoloma (Fr.) Donk Bracket 1-8cm across, thin, flat, and crust-like, with a sharp margin; orangy brown to russet brown with a paler margin, becoming dark brown to blackish; concentric rings and hairy ridges. Tubes up to 5mm deep, accumulating layers annually. Pores 2-5mm, angular to elongated; bright ochre-tawny. No stem. Flesh 1-3mm thick; tawny or dingy yellow; separated from cap hair by black line. Spores subglobose, smooth, 4.5-5.5 x 4-5-. Deposit light brown. Setae present. Habitat in dense overlapping clusters or partly fused rows on decaying or living conifer trunks. Found in Europe and most of North America. Season sometimes perennial. Not edible.
Inedible
Oxyporus populinus (Schum. ex Fr.) Donk syn. Fomes populinus (Schum. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Fomes connatus (Weinm.) Gill. Pappelporling L-pcs-zetes tapl- Poplar Bracket. Bracket 3-6cm across, 2-3cm wide, 1-4cm thick, in tiers; upper surface uneven, whitish grey to pale grey-buff often with an ochraceous tint, frequently green tinged due to being overgrown by algae or moss. Flesh white. Smell slightly fungusy. Tubes 2-4mm long in each layer, whitish at first then straw-yellow. Pores 4-7 per mm, circular or slightly angular, whitish. Cystidia in tubes thin-walled, hyaline, clavate or fusoid with encrusted apex. Spores white, subglobose, 3.5-4.5 x 3-4um. Hyphal structure monomitic; generative hyphae without clamp-connections. Habitat on trunks of deciduous trees. Season all year. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Choice
Laetiporus cincinnatus Syn. Laetiporus sulphureus var. semialbinus. Found at the base of hard wood trees normally Oak. Distinct from Laetiporus sulphureus because the pore surface is white not yellow. Tom Volk the American expert on tree growing fungi says this species is even better to eat than the yellow pored form, (make sure it is well cooked). Cap large up to at least 50-60 cm wide. Spores 5-7 x 3.5-5 um, print white. For recipe see Laetiporus sulphureus.
Inedible
Ischnoderma resinosum (Fr.) Karsten Gyant?s k?rgestapl? (tapl?). Fruit body annual; no stem, broadly attached, or with a small stem-like attachment. Bracket up to 15cm across, 12cm wide, 3cm thick at base, semicircular, with a thick rounded or lobed margin; at first fleshy and exuding resin, then hard and brittle; upper surface ochre to rusty brown to blackish; finely felty and fairly smooth, becoming concentrically zoned and ridged and wrinkled with a glossy black resinous crust. Tubes up to l0mm deep; brownish. Pores 4-6 per mm, angular to round; surface creamy white, darker when touched, later pale brown. Flesh up to l0mm thick at base, soft becoming harder; whitish drying yellowish brown to pale cinnamon. Spores cylindrical, smooth, 5-7 X 1.5-2?. Deposit white. Hyphal structure dimitic; clamps present. Habitat singly or occasionally overlapping on logs and stumps of hardwoods. Found in Europe and throughout North America. Season September-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Inonotus obliquus (Fr.) Pilat Birch Conk, Chaga, Clinker Polypore, Fruit body sterile conk 25-40cm across; black; deeply cracked, very hard and brittle when dry. Fertile portion 5m thick, crust-like, thin; dark brown. Tubes 3-l0mm deep, brittle, usually split in front. Pores 6-8 per mm, circular; whitish becoming dark brown. No stem. Flesh corky, faintly zoned; bright yellowish brown. Spores broadly ellipsoid to ovoid, smooth, 9-10 x 5.5-6.5?. Setae present. Habitat beneath the bark or outer layers of wood on living, dead, standing, or fallen trees, erupting into conspicuous black conks, generally on birch, elm, and alder. Found in northern North America, and northern Europe to Russia. Season all year. Not edible although it comes highly recomended for cancer treatments, it is this fungus that is discussed by Solzhinitsyn in his book 'The Cancer Ward', a tea made from the fungus is drunk daily, the fungus has been found to contain inotodiol which has active anti-tumor properties. (It is only the specimens growing on Birch trees that seem to have this property). It has also been shown to have antiviral activity against HIV.
Inedible
Inonotus cuticularis (Bull. ex Fr.) Samtporling Karst. V?kony rozsd?stapl? (tapl?). Bracket 5?20cm across, 3?10cm wide, 0.5?2.5cm thick, single or in overlapping tiers, soft and fleshy when young, later corky and fibrous; upper surface velvety becoming smooth, zoned, apricot at first then rusty, finally umber or tobacco-coloured. Flesh rusty brown, fibrous. Tubes 3?10mm long, rusty. Pores 2?4 per mm, circular at first becoming irregular, yellow-brown then rusty or cinnamon, glancing in the light. Spores brown, ovoid-ellipsoid, 5.5?8?4?6m. Hyphal structure dimitic; generative hyphae without clamp-connections. Setae in tubes dark brown, fusiform, with acute apex projecting beyond the basidia; similar seta-like structures are found on the cap-surface but these are dark brown, branched and anchor-shaped. Habitat on deciduous trees, especially oak and beech. Season autumn, annual. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hirschioporus abietinus (Dicks. ex Fr.) Donk syn. Polystictus abietinus (Dicks. ex Fr.) Fr. New syn. Trichaptum abietinum Tannenporling. Bracket 1?3cm across, 0.5?2cm wide, 0.1?0.2cm thick, in overlapping rows or shelves; upper surface concentrically grooved, greyish, often with a greenish tint due to the growth of algae amongst the layer of woolly hairs covering the surface, margin pinkish and undulate. Flesh pale brownish or purplish. Tubes 0.3?0.7mm long, lilac when fresh drying reddish-brown. Pores 3?4 per mm, circular or angular becoming irregularly toothed, bright violet especially towards the margin of the cap but paling and brownish with age. Cystidia abundant, fusiform with slightly thickened walls and an encrusted apex, 12?35 x 5?7um. Spores hyaline, oblong-ellipsoid, 6.5?8 x 3?4um. Hyphal structure dimitic; generative hyphae with clamp-connections. Habitat on dead fallen coniferous trunks and stumps. Season all year. Frequent. Not edible. Found In Europe and north America.
Inedible
Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. syn. Fomes annosus (Fr.) Cke. Root Fomes, Polypore du rond des pins, Wurzelschwamm, Gy?k?rront? tapl?, Dennermoorder. Fruit body variable in shape, frequently forming large resupinate patches or irregular knobbly brackets 5?30cm across, 3?15cm wide, 1?2cm thick; upper surface uneven and lumpy covered in a light brown crust which darkens with age; margin thin, acute, white. Flesh whitish to pale wood-coloured. Smell strongly fungusy. Tubes 2?5mm long in each annual layer. Pores 2?4per mm, varying from circular to angular or irregularly elongated, white browning with age. Spores white, ovate, 4.5?6 x 3.5?4.5um. Hyphal structure dimitic; generative hyphae without clamp connections. Habitat parasitic on the roots of coniferous trees causing intensive rot and ultimately death of the infected tree; occasionally also infecting deciduous trees. Season all year, perennial. Common causing serious economical losses of conifers. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Ganoderma adspersum (Schulz.) Donk. Krustiger Lackporling Vastagk-rg- tapl-. Bracket 7-60cm across, 5-25cm wide, 3-30cm thick, upper surface with a thick dark brown hard knobbly crust which is concentrically ridged, margin thick and obtuse, white in the growing season. Flesh dark brown, thicker than the tube-layer. Tubes stratified, reddish-brown. Pores 3-4 per mm, circular, white to pale yellow-ochre, discolouring when handled. Spores brown, ovate, truncate at one end, 8-13 x 5.5-9um, mostly about 10 x 6.5um. Hyphal structure trimitic; generative hyphae with clamp-connections but these often difficult to demonstrate. Habitat parasitic on deciduous trees, usually found on the lower part of the trunks; the cocoa-like spore deposit is often very dense on top of the cap and on the wood above it. Season all year, perennial. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Fomitopsis cajanderi (Karsten) Kotlaba & Pouz. Fruit body perennial; no stem. Bracket up to 20cm across, 10cm wide, 7cm thick, flat to convex, with a sharp margin; light pinky-beige becoming darker pinkish brown or gray to blackish; finely felty becoming hairy or smooth. Tubes 1-3mm deep per season; pale pinky-brown; layers stratified, up to 2cm thick. Pores 4-5 per mm, circular to angular; surface rose colored. Flesh up to lcm thick, corky; rosy pink to light pinkish brown. Spores cylindrical, curved, smooth, 5-7 x 1.5-2?. Deposit whitish. Hyphal structure dimitic; clamps present. Habitat singly or overlapping on dead conifer wood; rarely on hardwoods. Found throughout North America. Season all year. Edibility not known -inedible.
Inedible
Coniophora puteana (Schum.) Karst. syn. C. cerebella Pers. syn. Corticium puteanum (Schum.) Fr. Gelber Holzschwamm Vastagb?r? foltgomba Wet Rot. Fruit body resupinate, forming irregular patches 4?20cm across, creamy white at first then pale yellow becoming dirty chrome to olivaceous, margin broad, white, radiating, surface irregular, rough and warted. Flesh very thin. Spores olivaceous-brown, broadly elliptic, 11?13 x 7?8?. Habitat on trunks, decaying wood or timbers; it is one of the major causes of wet rot in damp buildings. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Coltricia montagnei (Fr.) Murr. Fruit body annual. Cap up to 12cm across, 1-2cm thick, circular or irregular, depressed toward the stem, with a wavy margin; cinnamon to deep reddish, rusty brown when older, sometimes with uneven furrowed bands of color and a paler margin in growing specimens; velvety or finely felty becoming hairy, warted, or scaly, particularly toward the center. Tubes up to 4mm deep, rarely 8mm near the stem. Pores 1-3mm, angular, often expanded and radially elongated toward the stem; in some specimens the pores join together to form pseudogills with 1-3mm between the pseudogills; pore surface cinnamon to rusty brown. Stem 10-40 x 5-l0mm, central or lateral, expanding toward the pore surface; cinnamon to deep rusty brown; felty to warted with smooth patches in age. Flesh up to 2cm thick at center; cinnamon to rusty brown; upper part soft then corky, lower part distinctly denser. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, 9-14 x 5.5-7.5?. Deposit pale brown. Hyphal structure monomitic. Habitat on the ground, often on footpaths and clay banks in hardwood forests. Found in eastern North America and in Oregon. Season July-October. Not edible too tough. Comment In the past, this fungus has been split into two varieties. Those with the concentric pseudogills were known as Coltricia montagnei var. greenii Fr., which was also known as Cyclomyces greenii Berk., and the poroid variety, known as Coltricia montagnei Fr. var. montagnei.
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