Brown Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 622

Inedible
Tremella foliacea Fries Fodros rezg?gomba. Known as Brown Witches? Butter. The fungus is an irregular gelatinous arrangement of lobes and cups fused at the base 5-15 cm wide. The colour is brown to reddish-ochre, lighter when fresh and young. Spores dull cream-yellowish, 8-11 x 6-9um nearly spherical. Smell and taste slight. Growing on hardwood twigs and logs in autumn right up to winter; Found in both Europe and North America . Said to be edible but I advise not eating it. The pictures were sent to me by Lorand Barth? in Hungary the second one was taken by Edit Szilv?sy to both of them I am most grateful.
Inedible
Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) Fr. Earthfan, T?l?phore terrestre, Erdledepilz, Talajlak? szem?lcsgomba (szem?lcs?sgomba), Franjezwam. Fruit body 3?6cm across, fan-shaped, vertical to horizontal, forming large clustered groups, reddish- to chocolate-brown, darkening to almost black with age, covered in radiating fibres, becoming paler and fringed at the margin. Lower or fertile surface clay-brown to pallid, irregularly wrinkled. Spores purple-brown, angular and warted, 8?9 x 6?7?. Habitat in conifer woods or heaths, usually on sandy soil. Season late summer to early winter. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Thelephora palmata (Scop.) Fr. Stinkende Lederkoralle B?d?s szem?lcs?sgomba (szem?lcsgomba), b?d?s b?r-korallgomba. Fruit body 2?5cm high, 1?3cm across, comprising several erect, flattened, palmate purple-brown branches arising from a common stem 10?15 x 2?5mm. Flesh leathery. Smell fetid or strongly of garlic. Spores reddish-brown, angular and spiny, 8?11 x 7?8?. Habitat on the ground near conifers. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Easily recognized by the strong smell. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Suillus variegatus (Fr.) O. Kuntze syn. Boletus variegatus Fr. Sandr-hrling, Semmelpilz, Tarka feny-tin-ru (-tin-ru), Bolet mouchet-, C-pe tachet- ou verget-, Velvet Bolete. Cap 6-13cm, rusty tawny or ochraceous to olivaceous, speckled with darker, small, flattened scales, initially slightly downy becoming slightly greasy with age, tacky in wet weather. Stem 50-90 x 15-20mm, ochre, more yellow towards apex, flushed rust-colour below. Flesh pale lemon in cap, more deeply coloured in stem base, sometimes tinged with blue throughout or above the tubes. Taste slight, smell strongly fungusy. Tubes dark buff. Pores subangular and compound, ochre with olivaceous tint at first becoming more cinnamon. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusoid-elongate to ellipsoid, 9-11 x 3-4um. Habitat with conifers. Season late summer. Occasional. Edible. Found In Europe and north America.
Edible
Suillus luteus (Fr.) S. F. Gray syn. Boletus luteus Fr. Slippery Jack, Bolet Jaune, Nonnette voil-e, Bolet annulaire, Butterpilz, Barna gy-r-stin-ru (-tin-ru), Boleto giallo, Bruine Ringboleet. Cap 5-10cm, chestnut to sepia covered in brown gluten, becoming more rust-coloured with age, shiny on drying. Stem 50-100 x 20-30mm, pale straw-coloured at apex rapidly discoloured with darkening glandular dots, with a large white to cream ring which darkens to sepia, white below becoming vinaceous brown with age. Flesh white, often vinaceous at base of stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Tubes lemon-yellow to straw-colour. Pores round, similarly coloured, becoming flushed sienna. Spore print clay to ochraceous. Spores subfusiform to elongate ellipsoid, 7-10 x 3-3.5um. Habitat with conifers, usually Scots pine. Season autumn. Common. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Suillus granulatus (Fr.) O. Kuntze. syn. Boletus granulatus Fr. K-rnchenr-hrling, Feny-tin-ru, szemcs-st-nk- feny--tin-ru, Bolet granul-, Nonnette pleureuse Weeping Bolete. Cap 3-9cm, rusty brown to yellowish, viscid, shiny when dry. Stem 35-80 x 7-10mm, lemon-yellow flushed vinaceous to coral towards the base, the upper region covered in white or pale yellow granules which exude pale milky droplets. Flesh lemon-yellow, lemon-chrome in stem, paler in cap. Taste and smell slight but pleasant. Tubes buff to pale yellow, unchanging. Pores small, similarly coloured, exuding pale milky droplets. Spore print ochraceous sienna. Spores subfusiform-ellipsoid, 8-10 x 2.5-3.5um. Habitat with conifers. Season late autumn. Common. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Stropharia rugosoannulata Farlow ex Murr. King Stropharia, Wine Cup, -ri-s harmatgomba. Cap 5-20cm across, convex-flattened to umbonate; deep purplish red to dull brown or even grayish or white with age; smooth, not viscid. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then gray and finally purple-brown. Stem 100-180x 10-25mm, equal to clavate; white; smooth; ring large, prominent, deeply wrinkled or segmented below, very thick, white. Flesh firm; white. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-13 x 7.5-9-. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on wood chips and bark mulch and around flower beds. Very common. Found Europe and widely distributed in northern North America. Season June-October. Edible-delicious. Comment An almost pure white form is not infrequent; also a closely related (probably undescribed) yellow species with viscid cap may be found at the same time.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia hornemannii (Fr.) Lundell Fenyves harmatgomba. Cap 6-15cm across, broadly convex umbonate; dull reddish brown or purple-brown, with white veil remnants at margin; very viscid when wet. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120x 10-20mm; white; strongly fibrillose-scaly below the prominent ring. Flesh white. Odor a little unpleasant. Taste a little unpleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-14 x 5.5-7?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on rotting conifer logs. Found in Europe and northern North America. Season August-November. Not edible- possibly poisonous.
Inedible
Stereum gausapatum (Fr.) Fr. syn. Stereum spadiceum (Fr.) Fr. Brauner Schichtpilz Nemezes r?teggomba Bleeding Oak Crust. Fruit body resupinate or forming small tiered brackets 1?4cm across, tough and leathery, thin-fleshed; upper surface zoned ochre-brown to greyish, finely hairy, margin white. Fertile or lower surface pallid to dark chestnut, smooth, bleeding red if cut when fresh. Spores white, oblong, amyloid, 7?8 x 3?3.5um. Habitat on stumps, logs and fallen branches of deciduous trees, especially oak. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Scutellinia scutellata (L. ex St. Amans) Lamb. Common Eyelash S?rt?s cs?szegomba. Cup 0.2?1cm across, shallowly disc-shaped, inner surface bright orange-red, outer pale brown covered in stiff dark brown or black hairs up to 1,000? long and 40? wide towards the forked, rooting bases, narrowing towards the pointed apices, septate; visible without a lens as distinct ?eyelashed? rimming the margin. Asci 300 x 25?. Spores elliptical and with a roughened exterior, containing several small oil droplets, 18?19 x 10?12?. Habitat on damp soil or rotten wood. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Scleroderma verrucosum (Bull.) Pers. Braunwarziger Kartoffelbovist, Nyeles ?ltrifla, Scl?roderme verruqueux, Scaly Earthball. Fruit body 2.5?5cm across, subglobose often flattened on top, tapering into a long, thick stem-like base which is usually prominently ribbed, yellowish to brown covered in small brownish scales, the thin leathery wall breaking open irregularly above when mature. Gleba olive-brown. Spores dark brown, globose covered in spines or warts, 10?14um in diameter. Habitat on sandy soil in woods or heaths. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Scleroderma cepa (Vaill.) Pers. Fruit body 1.5-9cm across, subglobose, flattened, or lobed; no stem or almost none, attached by a thick mass of tough, hairy mycelium. Peridium (outer skin) 1-3mm thick; when fresh, hard, quite tough; white in cross-section, becoming reddish or pinkish brown when cut. Surface whitish when young, becoming straw-colored to yellowish brown or leather brown, turning deep pinky-brown if rubbed; smooth becoming very finely cracked and scaly, especially on the top where exposed to light. Spore mass white and firm when young, soon becoming black or purple-black, then paler or browner and powdery. Odor none. Spores globose, spiny but not reticulate, 7-10 x 7-10-. Habitat singly, scattered, or in groups under deciduous and coniferous trees in woods, in gardens, and along roadsides. Common. Found widely distributed in North America. Season July-October. Poisonous.
Inedible
Scleroderma areolatum Ehr. syn. S. lycoperdoides Schwein. Netzbovist Pikkelyes (leop-rd) -ltrifla Leopard Earthball. Fruit body 1-3(4)cm across, subglobose, tapering into a thick rooting stalk which passes into a few strong mycelial strands, yellowish-brown covered in smooth very dark scales surrounded by a ring giving a dotted, reticulate pattern when the scales have been worn off, opening by an irregular slit or pore. Gleba deep purplish-brown. Spores dark brown, globose, 9-14m in diameter, covered in spines 1.5m long. Habitat damp places on bare ground or amongst sparse grass or moss. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula vesca Fr. Bare-toothed Russula, Russule comestible, Fleischroter Speiset-ubling, R-ncos galambgomba, r-ncost-nk- galambgomba, Rossola edule, Smakelijke russula. Cap 5-10cm across, somewhat globose at first, later flattened convex, rather variable in colour, often with pastel tints, from dark or pale wine-coloured to buff, sometimes with olive or greenish tints, fleshy, firm, the skin half peeling, tending to retreat from the margin leaving the underlying flesh visible. Stem 30-100 x 15-25mm, white, rather hard, often with somewhat pointed base. Flesh white. Taste mild, nutty. Gills adnexed, whitish to very pale cream, rather closely spaced, narrow, forked, especially near stem. Gills and stem surface rapidly deep salmon when rubbed with an iron salt. Spore print whitish (A). Spores ovoid with small warts up to 0.5- high, very occasionally with short lines attached or joining pairs, 6-8 x 5-6-. Cap cystidia cylindrical or spindle-shaped, without septa, hardly reacting to SV. Cap hyphae with cylindrical or tapering terminal cells or sometimes a long, tapering, thick-walled hair; supporting cells rectangular. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula turci Bres. Jodoform-T-ubling, J-dszag- galambgomba. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, soon flattening and with a depression, mauve, dark or dull purple, wine coloured, bay or dark fawny, paling in places, fleshy, sticky or even glutinous when moist, drying matt and often powdered, one third peeling. Stem 30-70 x 10-25mm, white, rarely tinged rose, becoming dirty or brownish, cylindrical or narrow club-shaped. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell of iodoform at stem base. Gills adnexed, saffron, with connecting veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre (G). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5- high, mostly joined by fine lines or ridges to form a well-developed network, 7-9 x 6-8-. Cap cystidia absent; hyphae with incrustations staining with fuchsin abundant. Habitat under conifers. Season early summer to autumn. Frequent in Scotland, rare in England. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula subfoetens Smith. Cap 5-10cm across, rounded then with a depressed center; dull honey yellow to brownish; margin coarsely tuberculate-striate, viscid when wet. Gills adnate, cream-yellow, often brown-spotted. Stem 50-100 x 10-25mm, narrowing near base, firm; pale honey yellow. Flesh pale straw, yellowing when cut, and turning bright golden in KOH. Odor slightly unpleasant, fetid. Taste hot in cap cuticle but mild in flesh. Spores oval-ellipsoid, 7-9 x 5-6-; warts 0.3-0.71- high, few connectives. Deposit cream (C-D). Habitat in mixed woods. Found in Europe and eastern North America, west to Michigan, south to North Carolina. Season July-September. Not edible.
Inedible
Russula sororia (Fr.) Romell (R. amoenolens Romagn.) Scharfer Bratt?ubling, Barna galambgomba, Russule soeur, Sepia Brittlegill. Cap 3?6cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, sepia to greyish sepia, rarely white, thinnish-fleshed, slightly sticky when moist, half-peeling; margin furrowed, with small, low warts. Stem 30?60 x 10?20mm, whitish, fairly firm to soft and fragile. Flesh white. Taste unpleasant, oily, slowly very hot; smell rancid or suggesting Camembert cheese. Gills adnexed, creamy to dirty whitish, edge browning. Spore print pale cream (B?D). Spores broadly elliptic with warts up to 0.7? high, a few joined by fine lines, no network, 7?9 x 5?7?. Cap cystidia narrow, tapering, poorly reacting to SV. Habitat under oak. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula sardonia Fr. Zitronenbl?ttriger T?ubling, Citromlemez? galambgomba, Russule ?cre, Russule ? couleur de sardoine, Primrose Brittlegill. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, violet-, purplish- or brownish-red, greenish or ochre to yellowish, hard, shortly peeling only. Stem 30?80 x 10?15mm, sometimes white but usually entirely pale lilac to greyish rose, firm; surface as if powdered. Flesh white. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed to slightly decurrent, at first primrose, later pale golden yellow, narrow. Gills and flesh reacting rose with ammonia (distinguishes this species). Spore print cream (C?F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5? high, joined into ridges or by fine lines to form a rather poorly developed network, 7?9 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia spindle-shaped or cylindrical, without septa, strongly reacting to SV. Habitat under pine. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Found In Europe and western north America. Edibility suspect-not advisable.
Inedible
Russula pectinatoides Pk. Enyhe galambgomba. Cap 3-8cm across, convex to centrally depressed, margin strongly striate- tuberculate; yellowish brown to dull straw color or cinnamon; viscid when wet; cuticle peels halfway or more. Gills thin; white to pale cream. Stem 25-50 x 5-l0mm, hollow, equal; white to pale yellowish or brown where bruised. Flesh white. Odor slightly oily or fetid. Taste mild or slightly acrid. Spores ovoid, 7.5-9 x 5.5-7.5?; warts 0.4-0.6? high, with an incomplete reticulum. Deposit cream (D-E). Habitat in mixed hardwoods. Quite common. Found in Europe and northeastern North America, west to Michigan, south to North Carolina. Season July-September. Not edible.
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