Orange Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
Normal size:
Location:
Flesh:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Text:

Total mushrooms fount: 189

Inedible
Mycena leaiana (Berk.) Sacc. Cap 1-5cm across, bell-shaped becoming convex, with center sometimes depressed; bright reddish orange becoming more yellow in age; slimy, shiny, smooth. Gills adnate, close to crowded, broad; dirty yellow-pink, staining orange-yellow when cut, with bright red-orange edges. Stem 30-70 x 1-3mm, tough, fibrous; orange to yellow, paler near apex, exuding a little watery, orange juice; slimy and somewhat sticky with base covered in dense, coarse hairs. Flesh thickish, pliant; white beneath the orange cuticle. Odor faintly mealy. Taste slight. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 7-10 x 5-6-. Deposit white. Habitat in dense clusters on deciduous wood. Common. Throughout central and eastern states of North America. Season f one-September. Edibility not known- avoid. ----------- This month's fungi, Mycena leaiana, is a great mushroom to find in the woods. It's shiny orange, with glowing orange marginate gills (more on that later), and therefore often sticks out from an extended distance. Despite the fact that the mushrooms themselves are very small at maturity, usually significantly less than an inch (3 cm) in diameter, they could be very prolific fruiters, so there is a huge amount of it to be seen often. Even in dry weather you could find it since it uses this found very deep in the log to create its fruiting bodies. Understand that mushrooms are 90-95% normal water, so if there is no drinking water there are no mushrooms, but Mycena leaiana appears to be an excellent scavenger of drinking water through its mycelium from solid wood. The edibility of the fungus is unidentified, but is as yet not known to be poisonous. That said, there appears to be nothing at all to recommend it for the stand anyway, since it is rather small and has a fairly rubbery surface if you make an effort to cut it. The orange color comes off on the hands when you touch it, and it might be dreamed by me would do the same in the mouth area. So how about these marginate gills? If you look on the lower of the mushroom, you can view that the gills are orange. This seems just like a contradiction, because the spore printing is white. In the event that you look just a little deeper however, e.g. with a side lens, you can view that the orange color is mainly limited to the advantage of the gills. A straight closer look with a microscope reveals that the orange pigment is mainly limited to cystidia, sterile cells at the edge of the gill. Cystidia on the border of the gill are medically called "cheilocystidia" (practically, "lip cystidia"). Compare these to the "pleurocystidia" ("part cystidia") entirely on (you guessed it) the attributes of the gills of Pluteus cervinus. Mycena leaiana microscopic mix portion of the gills The cystidia are shiny orangeBelow and the left you can view what these cystidia appear to be microscopically. Observe that the strikingly beautiful orange cystidia include almost all of the advantage of the gill, offering this varieties its quality orange margin. However if you look from the gill advantage toward the basidia (basidiospore producing set ups), you will get some wayward orange cystidia borne singly on the list of basidia often.
Edible
The term "salmonicolor" comes from the Latin and means with the colour of raw salmon flesh. This species, like all the Lactarius with red milk, in some zones is quite sought after for culinary purposes and this has created several local or dialectal names. ----- Cap : 4 - 12 cm, initially convex, then flat and finally depressed, almost funnel-shaped in the ripe fungus, much fleshy, of irregular shape, at times lobate, gibbous; margin inrolled in the young fungus for long time, then extended, flexuous, regular or just wavy, not striated. The surface is smooth, glabrous, greasy when the weather is humid, otherwise bright, at times there are evident signs of zones; of salmon, orange-reddish, colour, with concentric humid spots. Hymenium: thick gills, adnate-decurrent, often forked when close to the stipe; intercalated with several lamellules; of pale orange or orange only colour, they stain at times of violet on the lesions, rarely greenish by the end. Stipe: 2-8 × 1-3 cm. Flesh: thick, firm, whitish, cream-pale orange without hues of green, turning after about one hour brown-reddish, it may be also immutable. Pleasant smell, mild flavour. Latex: rather scarce, orange-reddish, immutable even is isolated, sourish taste. Habitat: it grows in summer and in autumn, mainly under fir, also mixed to beech or spruce. Microscopy: spores clearly ellipsoidal, warty, with some isolated warts, others forming crests, isolated or forming an incomplete reticulation, 7-9 × 6-7,5 µm. Cylindraceous basidia, sub-clavate, tetrasporic, 53-61 × 10-12 µm. Fusiform cistydia, thinned at the top, acuminate, 52-70 × 6-7 µm. Remarks : it’s an easy to recognize species due to the habitat, it grows mainly under Abies alba, due to the yellow-orange latex, the salmon coloured cap, the slimy cuticle with humid weather, the zonation at the margin almost absent and the fact of not turning green.
Inedible
Stropharia aurantiaca (Cke.) Orton New syn. Leratiomyces ceres Orangeroter Tr?uschling T?glav?r?s harmatgomba, narancspiros harmatgomba Redlead Roundhead. Cap 1.5?5.5cm across, convex then expanded, orange-red with paler patches when dry, viscid when moist, margin often with whitish velar remnants. Stem 20?100 x 2?10mm, slightly thickened at base, whitish becoming streaked ochraceous or orange-red below. Flesh pale buff to concolorous. Gills whitish at first then olivaceous-clay. Pleurocystidia thin-walled, lanceolate with a sharp-pointed apex and yellowish contents. Cheilocystidia variable in shape, mostly thin-walled and lageniform often with flexuous necks, sometimes irregularly cylindric or clavate with a swollen or even capitate apex. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores elliptic, 11?13 x 6?7.5um. Habitat on rotting sawdust, usually in parks or gardens. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility unknown -avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Serpula lacrymans (Fr.) Karst. syn. Merulius lacrymans Schum. Dry Rot Fungus, Hausschwamm, K?nnyez? h?zigomba, Huiszwam. Fruit body 5?50cm across, usually resupinate but occasionally forming brackets on vertical substrates, arising from whitish, pinkish, lilac or grey mycelium. Flesh 2?12mm thick, greyish-white, spongy-fleshy. Pores rusty-yellow becoming more yellowish towards the thick, white sterile margin. Spores rust-brown, elliptic, 8?10 x 5?6um. The fungus gives off a distinctive damp rotten smell. Habitat on worked wood in buildings although the fruit bodies of the fungus may also appear on non-organic substrates such as plaster or brickwork. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Infection of wood occurs when it has become sodden for some long time following prolonged damp due to leaking roofs or pipes, either by spores or by vegetative mycelium spreading through brickwork. On germination of the spores the mycelia exhibit two distinct modes of growth. Firstly, numerous fine hyphae penetrate the wood, producing enzymes which break down the wood and enable the fungus to absorb nutrients; as the wood dries it cracks into cubical blocks and eventually disintegrates into brown powder. It is the second mode of growth which is most easily detected since it takes the form of thick mycelial cords and cottony sheets spreading over brickwork, metal, etc. enabling the fungus to travel over areas from which it cannot derive nutrients. The fruit bodies arise from these mycelial cords. Thios phoyograph was lent to me by Alan and Patie Outen.
Inedible
Scutellinia scutellata (L. ex St. Amans) Lamb. Common Eyelash S?rt?s cs?szegomba. Cup 0.2?1cm across, shallowly disc-shaped, inner surface bright orange-red, outer pale brown covered in stiff dark brown or black hairs up to 1,000? long and 40? wide towards the forked, rooting bases, narrowing towards the pointed apices, septate; visible without a lens as distinct ?eyelashed? rimming the margin. Asci 300 x 25?. Spores elliptical and with a roughened exterior, containing several small oil droplets, 18?19 x 10?12?. Habitat on damp soil or rotten wood. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula decolorans (Fr.) Fr. Orangeroter Graustielt?ubling, Tarkah?s? galambgomba, Russule d?color?e, Copper Brittlegill Cap 4.5?11cm across, subglobose at first then convex and flattening, finally with a depression, brownish red or orange, reddish sienna, tawny or cinnamon, staining black or brown, firm, sticky when moist, peeling at margin only; margin finally furrowed. Stem 45?100 x 10?25mm, white, greying strongly, firm, often with club-shaped base. Flesh thick, greying strongly on exposure. Taste mild. Gills adnexed, pale ochre, blackening, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print deep cream to pale ochre (E or F). Spores ovoid to elliptic with spines of various heights up to 1.5?, mostly isolated but some connected by thin lines to form a very incomplete network with only 1?2 meshes, 9?14 x 7?12?. Cap surface with numerous slightly club-shaped dermatocystidia with one or no septa. Habitat under conifers. Season summer to autumn. Uncommon in the UK ? confined to the Highland region of Scotland. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Rickenella fibula (Bull. ex Fr.) Raith. Moha k?gy?gomba, s?rga moha-k?gy?gomba. Cap 0.3-1.5cm, convex with deep depression at center, striate; orange-yellow to buff. Gills deeply decurrent, distant; white. Stem 10-50 x 1-2mm; yellow-orange; smooth to finely hairy. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores ellipsoid, 4-5 x 2-2.5?. Deposit white. Habitat in moss. Found in Europe and throughout most of North America. Season June-November. Edibility not known.
Inedible
Rhodotus palmatus (Bull. ex Fr.) Maire syn. Pleurotus palmatus (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu-l. R-tlicher Adernseitling R-zs-s t-nkgomba. Cap 5-10cm across, convex then flattened, horizontal, clear pink at first later peach to apricot-coloured, distinctly wrinkled, margin inrolled; pellicle gelatinous, thick and tough, entirely separable. Stem 30-70 x 10-15mm, white to pinkish, covered in white fibrils, curved. Flesh whitish tinged pink to orange. Taste bitter, smell pleasant. Gills paler than the cap, interconnected. Spore print pinkish. Spores subglobose, finely warted, 5-7um in diameter. Habitat on elm logs or beams. Season early autumn to winter. At one time rare, but due to the abundance of dead elms now becoming quite frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Ramaria stricta, Steife Koralle, Merev korallgomba. ---- Ramaria stricta grows from wood--though the wood is often buried. It features branches that are usually "strictly" oriented, so that they are mostly straight and ascending. When fresh, its branch tips are yellow and its branches are dull yellowish buff, but its surfaces bruise and discolor purplish brown. Under the microscope it features roughened spores, clamp connections, and thick-walled hyphae. Several very similar species have been separated by mycologists (see below), and the name Ramaria stricta should probably represent a group of potential species awaiting contemporary study. ---- Overall, the fruit body appears bushy, and is medium sized, up to 10 by 7 cm (3.9 by 2.8 in), ochraceous tinged with flesh-colour becoming darker or brownish cinnamon with age, tips of branches at first clear yellow then concolorous; All parts bruising vinaceous, stem arising from white mycellum or rhizomorphs, passing into numerous dichotomous branches. Flesh white or pale yellow, tough ( Whitish; fairly tough. ). Taste slightly peppery, smell sweet ( Odor not distinctive, or sweet and fragrant; taste bitter ). Spores cinnamon-ochraceous, oblong, minutely rough to almost smooth 7.5-10.5 x 3.5-5 µ ( Spore Print: Rusty yellowish ). Habitat on stumps of conifers and broad-leaved trees. Season late summer to winter. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. ---- Ecology: Uncertain; while most ramarias are thought to be mycorrhizal, the wood-inhabiting species could be mycorrhizal or saprobic; growing from the dead (but sometimes buried) wood of conifers (and sometimes hardwoods); appearing alone, scattered, or gregariously; early summer through fall; apparently widely distributed in North America, but more common from the Rocky Mountains westward. Branches: Vertically oriented and elongated; often flattened; smooth; yellowish buff, becoming orangish buff as the spores mature; bruising and discoloring purplish brown; tips yellow when fresh and young. Base: Nearly absent, or fairly well developed; to 2 cm wide; white below; colored like the branches above; attached to numerous white rhizomorphs. Chemical Reactions: Iron salts green on branches; KOH orangish to brownish on branches.
Poisonous/Suspect
Ramaria formosa (Fr.) Qu?l. syn. Clavaria formosa Fr. Sch?ne Koralle Cifra korallgomba Clavaire ?l?gante. Fruit body 7?30cm high, 6?15cm wide, pinkish-ochraceous to orange-pink, lemon-yellow at tips of the numerous branches. Stem 30?60 x 25?60mm, whitish orange, itself much-branched. Flesh white or tinged orange-yellow, often bruising vinaceous to blackish. Taste bitter. Spores ochraceous, oblong, elliptic, roughened, 8?15 x 4?6?. Habitat in humus in woods, usually deciduous. Season autumn. Rare. Poisonous ? causes diarrhoea. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Ramaria botrytis (Fr.) Ricken. Hahnenkamm R?zs?s (r?zs?s?g?) korallgomba, Clavaire chou-fleur, Rosso Coral. Fruit body 7?15cm high, 6?20cm wide, white at first becoming tan or ochraceous with pink, red or purplish tips, numerous thick, much-branched, crowded branches arising from stout stem (3?4 x 1.5?6cm). Taste and smell pleasant, fruity. Spores ochraceous, oblong-elliptic, longitudinally striate, 14?16(20) x 4.5?5.5?. Habitat terrestrial, in broad-leaved woods. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Edible with caution. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Plyporus cinnabarina Jacq. ex Fr. syn. Trametes cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Fr. Cinnabar Polypore, Polypore ou Tram-te rouge cinabre, Zinnoberschwamm, Cin-bertapl-, Vermiljoenhoutzwam. Fruit body 3-11cm across, 2-8cm wide, 0.5-1.5cm thick, semicircular or fan-shaped, leathery becoming corky when dried; upper surface covered in fine soft hairs when young, later smooth and slightly wrinkled, bright red or orange-red becoming less bright with age. Tubes 2-6mm long, pale orange. Pores 2-3 per mm, circular or angular, cinnabar- or saffron-red. Spores white, oblong-ellipsoid, 4.5-6 x 2-2.5um. Hyphal structure trimitic. Habitat on dead deciduous trees, especially cherry, beech and birch. Season autumn. Very rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Phyllotopsis nidulans (Fr.) Singer Nemezes narancsoslaska. Fruit body a laterally attached, bracket-like cap without a stem. Cap 3-8cm across, circular to kidney-shaped, margin inrolled when young; bright yellow-orange when young, then tawny buff, densely hairy surface. Gills narrow, rather crowded; bright orange-yellow. Flesh pale orange-buff. Odor sharp, very unpleasant. Taste sharp, very unpleasant. Spores sausage-like, smooth, 6-8 x 3-4?. Deposit pinkish. Habitat on fallen timber, often in overlapping clusters. Found in Europe and throughout most of North America. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Pholiota highlandensis (Pk.) Smith & Hesler Cap 2-5cm across, broadly convex becoming flatter and somewhat depressed, sometimes with a low umbo; yellowy orange to cinnamon reddish brown with a paler margin, fading to ochraceous-buff colors; smooth except for veil remnants on the margin, hygrophanous. Gills adnate, close, broad, edges even or eroded; pallid or pale yellowish becoming cinnamon brown. Stem 20-40 x 3-6mm; top portion whitish to yellowish becoming dingy brown, lower portion pallid then brownish (darker than the top), with patches of pale yellow or buff veil remnants. Flesh thin; yellow. Odor not distinctive. Taste slightly disagreeable or none. Spores ellipsoid to oval, smooth, distinct pore at apex, 6-8 x 4-4.5?. Deposit cinnamon brown. Habitat on burned-over soil or charred wood. Found in many parts of North America, though apparently not in the Northeast. Season April-November. Not edible.
Inedible
Pholiota aurivella (Fr.) Kummer Rozsdas?rga (s?rga) t?kegomba. Cap 4-15cm across, bell-shaped to convex with a broad umbo; ochre-orange to tawny; sticky to slimy with large flattened spot-like scales, which may disappear or become somewhat sticky when wet. Gills adnate, close, moderately broad; pale yellowish becoming tawny brown. Stem 50-80 x 5-15mm, dry, solid, central or off-center; yellowish to yellow-brown; dry and cottony above the ring, hairy and with down-curving scales toward the base. Veil partial veil leaves evanescent ring or zone on upper stalk; white. Flesh firm; yellow. Odor sweet. Taste slight. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, with pore at apex, 7-9.5 x 4.5-6?. Deposit rusty brownish. Caulocystidia absent; pleurocystidia present. Habitat in clusters on living trunks and logs of hardwoods and conifers. Found Europe and in North America except the Southeast. Season June-November. Not edible.
Poisonous/Suspect
Phaeolepiota aurea (Matt. ex Fr.) Maire ex Konrad & Maublanc Aranys-rga t-kegomba. Cap 2-15cm across, obtuse to convex, becoming flatter with a central umbo and the margin often hung with veil remnants; orange-tan to golden brown; dry, granular to powdery. Gills adnate to free, close, broad; pale yellow becoming tawny to orange-brown. Stem 40-150 x 10-40mm expanded toward the base; orange to buff or similar to cap; smooth above the ring, powdery or granular below. Veil partial veil sheathing stalk; same color as cap; granular underneath, smooth above; leaving persistent flaring to drooping ring. Flesh thick; pale or yellowish. Spores ellipsoid, smooth to minutely roughened, 10-14 x 5-6-. Deposit yellowish brown to orange-buff. Habitat in groups or clusters on compost, rich soil, humus, or leaf litter under coniferous or deciduous trees. Quite rare but sometimes abundant. Found in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Season September-October. Not edible because it is mildly poisonous to some people. The field photograph was taken by Geoffrey Kibby.
Inedible
Otidea onotica (Pers.) Fuckel syn. Peziza onotica Pers. ex Fr. Hare-s Ear, Oreille de li-vre, Oreille d--ne, Eselsohr, Orecchia d'asino, Varkensoor, Ny-lf-lgomba. Cup 2-6cm wide, 3-10cm high, lopsided, irregularly ear-shaped, attached to the substrate by a short, indistinct whitish stalk, inner surface ochraceous flushed pinkish, outer similarly coloured and slightly scurfy. Flesh thin, white. Asci 250 x 10-, not blued by iodine. Paraphyses slender, curved at tip. Spores broadly elliptical, containing two oil drops, 12-13 x 5-6-. Habitat in soil in deciduous or mixed woodland. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Omphalotus olearius (DC. ex Fr.) Sing. syns. Omphallotus illudens (Schw.) Bigelow, Clitocybe olearia (Fr. ex DC.) Maire Jack O'lantern, -lbaumpilz, Vil-g-t- t-lcs-rgomba, Clitocybe de l'olivier, Pleurote de l'olivier. Cap 5-10cm across, strongly depressed to funnel-shaped, bright orange. Stem 40-140 x 7-28mm, wavy and tapering towards the base, paler than cap. Flesh yellowish, darkening towards the stem base. Taste not distinctive, smell strong and unpleasant. Gills decurrent, golden to orange. Spore print white. Spores subglobose, 5-7-4.5-6.5m. Habitat on the roots or at the base of trunks of certain trees; oak and chestnut in Britain, frequently on olive in Europe. Season autumn. Distribution, Europe. Very rare. Poisonous. This fungus may be seen to glow in the dark, the phosphorescence coming from the gills when the spores are mature.
Inedible
Mycena acicula (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Marasmiellus aciculus (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Sing. Orangeroter Helmling Narancsv-r-s k-gy-gomba Orange Bonnet. Cap 2-10mm, hemispherical, bright orange becoming paler towards the margin, striate. Stem 20-50-1mm, bright yellow becoming paler towards the rooting, slightly hairy base. Flesh very thin, orange in cap. Taste mild, smell none. Gills ascending, pale yellow with whitish edge. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia not very prominent, thin-walled, hyaline, fusoid. Spore print white. Spores fusiform, nonamyloid, 9-12 x 3-4um. Habitat on dead twigs and other woody fragments. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe and north America.
Inedible
Mutinus caninus (Pers.) Fr. Dog Stinkhorn, Phallus de Chien, Satyre des cheins, Hundsrute, K-z-ns-ges kutyasz-m-rcs-g, Fallo canino, mutino canino, Kliene Stinkzwam, Kutyasz-m-rcs-g. Fruit body initially a semi-submerged eggs as in Phallus impudicus but much smaller, 1-2cm across and more cylindric in shape, whitish-yellow, finally rupturing when the hollow pitted receptacle extends. Stem 10-12cm high, pale yellow-buff to bright orange, surmounted by the narrow conical orange-red head covered in dark olive slime which contains the spores and has a very slight sickly smell. Spores pale yellow, oblong, 4-5 x 1.5-2-. Habitat in leaf litter in woods. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
1
2
3
4
...
8
9
10