Orange Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
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Flesh:
Class:
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Total mushrooms fount: 189

Inedible
Lepiota ignivolvata Bousset-Joss. L-piote - base couleur de feu, Braunbuckliger Schirmpilz, Cs-kosgall-r- (v-r-sl-b-) -zl-gbomba. Cap 4-10cm across, convex then expanded and umbonate, centre reddish-brown, disrupting into tiny crowded ochraceous cream scales which become more dispersed towards the margin. Stem 60-120 x 6-15mm, slightly bulbous, with bright orange zone on the edge of the bulb which often becomes more obvious after collection; there is often a similar orange colour on the underside of the ring. Flesh white. Taste foul, smell strong and rank. Gills white to cream. Spore print white. Spores fusoid, 11-13 x 6um. Habitat deciduous and coniferous woods. Season autumn. Rare. Not edible -avoid. Found In Europe.
Edible
Leccinum quercinum (Pil?t) Green and Watling Eichen-Rotkappe T?lgyfa ?rdestin?ru (-tin?ru) Orange Oak Bolete. Cap 6?15cm, chestnut to date-brown, fibrillose scaly, becoming smooth and more rusty, margin overhanging the pores. Stem 110?180 x 20?35mm, pale brown to buff at apex with whitish scales becoming pale brown, stem whitish to buff towards base with whitish scales becoming rusty or purplish date, darkening on handling. Flesh white to cream rapidly pink or vinaceous in cap, more grey in the stem sometimes with a slight green flush in the base. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white to pale buff becoming vinaceous or cigar-brown. Pores small, similarly coloured. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform, 12?15 x 3.5?5um. Habitat with oak. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Edible. Found In Europe. The photograph with 12 specimens comes from Ted Green, thanks Ted.
Edible
Leccinum aurantiacum (Fr.) Gray syn. Boletus aurantiacus Espen-Rotkappe V?r?s ?rdestin?ru, t?lgyfa ?rdes tin?ru Bolet orang?. Cap 8?16cm across, orange to apricot, brown, smooth or slightly downy-fibrillose, cuticle overhanging tubes as an irregular skirt up to 3mm deep. Stem 80?140 x 18?48mm, initially covered in white scales which gradually turn rusty then dark brown. Flesh cream turning vinaceous in cap and stem base and sepia elsewhere. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white, vinaceous on exposure to air. Pores very small, white or cream bruising vinaceous. Spore print ochraceous buff. Spores subfusiform, 14?16.5 x 4?5um. Habitat with aspens. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Choice
Laetiporus sulphureus (Bull. ex Fr.) Murr. syn. Polyporus sulphureus Bull. ex Fr. Sulphur Shelf, Schwefelporling, S-rga g-vagomba (tapl-), Polypore soufr-, Chicken of the Woods. Bracket 10-40cm across, fan-shaped or irregularly semicircular, thick and fleshy, usually in large tiered groups; upper surface uneven, lumpy, and wrinkled, suede-like, lemon-yellow or yellow-orange drying pallid or straw-coloured; margin obtuse. Flesh at first succulent and exuding a yellowish juice when squeezed, but white and crumbly with age. Taste pleasant and slightly sourish, smell strong and fungusy. Tubes 1.5-3mm long, sulphur-yellow. Pores 1-3 per mm, circular or ovoid, sulphur-yellow. Spores white, ellipsoid to broadly ovate, 5-7 x 3.5-4.5um. Hyphal structure dimitic with generative and binding hyphae; generative hyphae without clamp-connections. Habitat deciduous trees, usually oak but common also on yew, cherry, sweet chestnut and willow. Season late spring to autumn, annual. Common. Edible when young and fresh, considered a delicacy in Germany and North America. Distribution, America and Europe. Comment there is a form of this fungus which has a white pore surface, and some authors recognize this as Laetiporus sulphureus var. semialbinus syn. Laetiporus cincinnatus.
Edible
Lactarius volemus Fr. Milchbr-tling, Keny-rgomba, Vachotte, Vachette. Cap 5-11cm across, convex with a depression, coloured apricot to tawny, fleshy, firm, shortly velvety to smooth, not sticky. Stem 40-120 x 10-30mm, concolorous with cap, but usually paler, shortly velvety to smooth, solid. Flesh whitish, firm. Gills slightly decurrent, narrow, somewhat closely spaced, easily breaking, pale golden yellow, bruising brown. Gill cystidia abundant, with thick, wavy walls. Milk white, abundant; taste mild. Smell fishy. Spore print whitish (B). Spores spherical; ridges thick, a few thin, forming a complete network, 8-10 x 8-9.5-. Cap surface cellular, cap and stem surfaces with spindle-shaped, tapering cystidia. Habitat under both coniferous and broad-leaved trees. Season summer to autumn. Uncommon. Edible - good. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, Europe and America where many varieties have been described.
Inedible
Lactarius scrobiculatus (Fr.) Fr. Cap 7-20cm across, broadly convex with a depressed disc and long inrolled, hairy margin, becoming flatter and broadly funnel-shaped with a smooth margin; pale ochre-yellow to yellow-orange, darker in the center with faint concentric bands of color, bruising dingy brown; very sticky, slimy when dry, scaly, often in rings. Gills adnate to decurrent, quite crowded, broad; whitish with a faint yellow or pink tint, bruising pale pinky-brown. Stem 30-60 x 15-35mm, sometimes tapering to a root-like base; tawny with glazed, yellow-brown spots and some white mycelium on the base; finely downy and pitted. Flesh rigid; white. Latex white, plentiful, quickly changing to sulphur yellow. Odor fruity. Taste burningly acrid. Spores broadly ellipsoid, amyloid, 7.1-8.6 x 5.9-6.8-; ornamented with warts, some paired, and fine lines making a sparse reticulum, prominences 0.5-l- high. Deposit bright ochre-yellow with a slight flesh tint. Habitat scattered to gregarious under conifers, particularly in mountain areas. Rare. Found in Oregon. Season September-October. Not edible. Comment My collection had burningly acrid milk, and I feel it should probably be recognized as Lactarius scrobiculatus var. scrobiculatus (Fr.) Fr., but the presence of this variety is not confirmed in North America.
Inedible
Lactarius rufus (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Rufous Milkcap, Lactaire roux, Fuchsfarbener Milchling, R-t tejel-gomba, r-t keser-gomba, Lattario fulvo, Rossige melkzwam. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, later flattening, finally with a central depression, the centre usually with a pointed umbo, red-brown, bay or dark brick, moderately thick-fleshed, breaking fairly easily, surface dry and matt, margin somewhat inrolled at first. Stem 40-80 x 5-20mm, concolorous with cap but paler. Flesh white, stem often hollow when old. Gills somewhat decurrent, brittle, yellowish at first, later as cap but paler. Milk white; taste mild then after about a minute very hot and acrid. Spore print creamy whitish (B) with slight salmon tinge. Spores elliptic, warts occasionally isolated but mainly connected by thin ridges to form a rather incomplete network, 8-9.5 x 6.5-7.5-. Habitat under pine. Season late spring to late autumn. Very common. Not edible although in some areas used as a seasoning after special treatment. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Comment Lactarius rufus var. parvus Smith & Hesler is darker in color when wet, and the habitat seems to be confined to conifer logs, the third of my pictures shows this var.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius chrysorrheus Fr. Goldfl-ssiger Milchling, S-rgatej- tejel-gomba, Lactaire - lait jaune, Yellowdrop Milkcap. Cap 3-8cm across, convex with a funnel-shaped depression, pale salmon to rosy or ochre-buff with darker rings of watery blotches or narrow concentric bands, smooth, margin hairless, incurved at first then straightening. Stem 30-80 x 9-20mm, cylindrical or with a slightly swollen base, whitish to pale buff, often flushed pinkish below. Flesh pallid to whitish becoming sulphur yellow from the milk, stem hollow. Gills decurrent, crowded, buff tinged pink. Milk white, abundant, becoming sulphur yellow in five to fifteen seconds; taste slowly bitterish and somewhat hot. Spore print creamy white (A+) with slight salmon tinge. Spores oval with an incomplete network of ridges, 7-8.5 x 6-6.5-. Habitat with oak in Europe, in groups in hardwood and mixed forests and under conifers in North America. Season summer to autumn. Occasional Europe. Widely distributed throughout North America. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Cke. syn. Clitocybe laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Kummer. Deceiver, Clitocybe laqu?, R?tlicher Lacktrichterling, Fopzwam, H?sbarna p?nzecskegomba. Cap 1.5?6cm across, convex then flattened, often becoming finely wavy at the margin and centrally depressed, tawny to brick-red and striate at the margin when moist drying paler to ochre-yellow, surface often finely scurfy. Stem 50?100 x 6?10mm, concolorous with cap, tough and fibrous, often compressed or twisted. Flesh thin reddish-brown. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pinkish, dusted white with spores when mature. Spore print white. Spores globose, spiny, 7?10m in diameter. Habitat in troops in woods or heaths. Season summer to early winter. Very common but very variable in appearance and therefore often difficult to recognize at first sight, hence the popular name ?Deceiver?. Edible but not worthwhile. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Comment Laccaria laccata var. pallidifolia (Pk.) Pk. Differs from the type form in its very pallid, whitish gills and generally smaller stature.
Edible
Hygrophorus nemoreus (Lasch) Fr. Ligeti csigagomba. Cap slightly greasy, pale orange brown, 4-8cm across. Gills, decurrent, cream coloured. Stem similar colour to the cap but paler. Smell slightly floury. Spore print white, 6-8x3.5-5um. Found in broad leaved or mixed woodland, favouring more chalky soils. Rare. Not known from America. Edible.
Inedible
Hygrophorus hypothejus (Fr. ex Fr.) Fr. syn. Limacium hypothejum (Fr. ex Fr.) Kummer. Hygrophore ? lames soufre, Gelbbl?ttriger Frostschneckling, Fagy?ll? csigagomba, Igroforo die pini, Dennelsijmkop, Herald of Winter. Hygrophorus hypothejus var. aureus, has now been sunk. Cap 3-6cm across, hemispherical then flattening, sometimes with depressed centre, olive-brown with paler margin, to bright orange, slimy. Stem 40?70 x 7?14mm, whitish tinged yellow or orange, slimy below the ring-like zone. Flesh whitish to pale yellow bruising orange-red. Gills decurrent, pale yellow. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid to ovoid, 7?9 x 4?5m. Habitat in pinewoods. Season late autumn, often appearing after the first frosts. Common. Edible ? not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca (Wulf. ex Fr.) Maire. False Chanterelle, Fausse Chanterelle, Girolle des pins, Falscher Pfifferling, Narancss?rga t?lcs?rgomba, Cantarello aranciato, gallinaccio false, Valse hanekam (Valse dooierzwam). Cap 2-8cm across, convex to shallowly funnel-shaped, often remaining incurved at the margin; color variable, typically some shade of orange-yellow to brownish yellow or dark brown, often darker at the center and more yellowish orange at the edge; dry, downy to felty. Gills decurrent, close, narrow, and dichotomously forked; color varies from deep orange to yellowish. Stem 20-100 x 5-20mm, often enlarged toward the base and curved; same color as cap or darker; dry, somewhat hairy. Flesh thin, tough; yellowish to orangish. Odor mild, mushroomy. Taste mushroomy. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, dextrinoid, 5.5-8 x 2.5-4.5?. Deposit white. Habitat singly, scattered, or in groups on the ground or on rotting coniferous wood. Common. Found widely distributed in North America. Season August-November (over-winters in California). Not edible as it is known to cause alarming symptoms (hallucination) in some cases. Comment Some authors feel that this species should be split: the almost white-capped form and the very dark brown-capped form would then probably be separate varieties. (Both illustrated.)
Inedible
Mennigroter Saftling Vermilion Waxcap Hygrocybe miniata (Fr.) Kummer syn. Hygrophorus miniatus (Fr.) Fr. Apr- (m-niumv-r-s) ned-gomba. Cap 0.5-1.5cm across, convex, bright scarlet, finely scurfy. Stem 20-50 x 2-5mm, concolorous with cap or more orange, smooth and shiny. Flesh thin, orange-red. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, yellow to vermillion or orange-red with paler yellow edge. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid to egg-shape, 7.5-10 x 5-6um. Habitat in grassy clearings in woods or on heaths. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edible but not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distinguished from the other small, bright red species in this genus by its dry scurfy cap. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hygrocybe marchii (Bres.) Sing. syn. Hygrophorus marchii Bres.Goldgelber Saftling Aranys?rga ned?gomba. Cap 1?4.5cm across, convex becoming depressed at the centre, orange-scarlet with yellowish margin and all over golden sheen. Stem 30?60 x 3?6mm, rich golden-yellow. Flesh yellowish, hollow in stem. Taste mild, smell pleasant. Gills decurrent, golden-yellow. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid-ovoid, 6.5?8.5 x 4?5um. Habitat amongst grass in woods and fields. Season autumn. Occasional. Edibility unknown -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hygrocybe conica (Scop. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Hygrophorus conicus (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Blackening Waxcap, Hygrophore conique, Kegeliger Saftling, Igroforo conico, Zwartwordende wasplaat, Feketed? ned?gomba. Cap 2?5cm across, acutely conical and often irregularly lobed, yellow-orange sometimes flushed scarlet becoming black when bruised or with age. Stem 20?60 x 8?10mm, bright yellow and blackening. Flesh pale yellow, bruising black. Taste and smell none. Gills sinuate, pale yellow. Spore print white. Spores broadly ellipsoid, 7?9(10) x 4?5(6)um in four-spored form but 9?12 x 6?8m in two-spored form. Habitat amongst grass in fields, lawns and roadsides. Season summer to late autumn. Frequent. Edible ? not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Choice
Hydnum rufescens Fr. syn. H. repandum var. rufescens (Fr.) Barla R-tlicher Stoppelpilz, V-r-sbarna (s-rg-sv-r-s) gerebengomba, Hydne roussisant, Terracotta Hedgehog. Differs from H. repandum in the orange-brown colour of the cap, the smaller and less robust form, the non-decurrent spines and slightly larger spores, 8-10-6-7m. Habitat deciduous and coniferous woods. Season autumn. Occasional. Edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Hydnellum aurantiacum (Fr.) Karsten Narancss-rga gereben. Fruit body often fused together. Cap 3-15cm across, flattened-depressed; orange-brown to rusty cinnamon; tomentose-velvety, often with coarse lumps and protrusions at center when mature. Spines on undersurface white then brownish with white tips. Stem 30-60 x 10-20mm; orange to dark brown. Flesh distinctly zoned; orange to cinnamon. Odor fragrant, persistent. Taste not distinctive. Spores strongly tuberculate, 5.5-7.5 x 5-6-. Deposit buff. Habitat under conifers, often in large groups. Common. Found throughout North America and in Europe. Season July-August. Not edible.
Poisonous/Suspect
Gymnopilus hybridus (Fr. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Flammula hybrida (Fr. ex Fr.) Gillet. Orangeroter Tannenfl-mmling. Foltoslemez- l-nggomba (t-kegomba). Cap 2-8cm across, convex then expanded, pale ochraceous at first then bright rusty-orange but remaining pale at the inrolled margin. Stem 25-50 x 4-8mm, ochraceous at first with a white cortinate zone, later becoming rusty towards the base which is covered in white down. Flesh ochraceous in cap becoming more rusty in stem or hollow. Taste bitter, smell scented. Gills ochre yellow. Cheilocystidia skittle-shaped. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped, warted, 7-9 x 3.5-4.5um. Habitat on conifer stumps and debris. Season late summer. Frequent. Edibility Suspect -avoid. Some species of Gymnopilus can be deadly poisonous Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Gloeophyllum sepiarium (Wulf. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Lenzites sepiaria (Wulf. ex Fr.) Fr. Zaunbl-ttling Cifra lemezestapl- (tapl-) Conifer Mazegill. Bracket 2-3cm across, 5-12cm wide, 0.5-1cm thick, fan-shaped and often in tiered groups, corky; upper surface coarsely concentrically ridged and radially wrinkled, softly hairy at first later bristly, indistinctly zoned maroon to rusty darkening with age towards the point of attachment, lighter, even bright rusty-orange near the margin. Flesh rusty-brown. Taste and smell slight and not distinctive. Gills densely and radially arranged and often fusing together irregularly giving a maze-like appearance, light ochraceous-rust drying tobacco-brown. Spores white, cylindric, 9-12.5 x 3-4.5um. Habitat on coniferous trees or timber causing an intensive brown rot which rapidly destroys the infected wood. Season all year, annual. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Ganoderma carnosum Pat. Syn. Ganoderma atkinsonii Jahn, Kotalba & Pouzar S-t-t lakkostapl- (tapl-). Very similar to Ganoderma lucidum which is found on hardwoods notably Oak. This species is found mainly on fir trees (Abies).Cap shiny and often zoned brown or yellowish, often with a distinct stem in similar colours. Spores 11-13.5x7.5-8.5um.
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