Orange Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
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Total mushrooms fount: 189

Edible
Russula velenovskyi Melzer & Zvara. Rehbrauner T-ubling, T-glav-r-s galambgomba, Russule de Velanovsky, Coral Brittlegill. Cap 3-8cm across, almost globose at first, then flattening and with a depression, often with a low umbo, red, coral, brick, wine- or flesh-coloured, pale ochre or buff in places, fleshy, two-thirds peeling. Stem 30-60 x 10-15mm, white, often tinged pink especially near base, firm, powdered above. Flesh white. Taste mild. Gills almost free, cream. Spore print deep cream (E-F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.7- high, with a very few thin lines, 6.5-9 x 5.5-7.5-. Cap cystidia sparse, mostly cylindrical, sometimes with septa, occasionally narrow club-shaped, with sparse granules staining in fuchsin. Habitat under broad-leaved trees and pine. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Found In Europe.
Inedible
Russula silvicola Shaffer. Cap 2-8cm across, convex to flattened; bright red to pinkish red, reddish orange; smooth, dry; peeling easily. Gills close, broad; white. Stem 20-80 x 4-15mm, clavate; white. Flesh soft; white. Odor fruity. Taste very hot. Spores broadly ovoid, 6-10.7 x 5.3-9?; warts up to 1.2? high, partial to complete reticulum. Deposit white (A). Habitat in mixed woods, often on rotten logs. Very common. Found throughout northern and eastern North America. Season July-October. Not edible
Edible
Russula roseipes (Seer.) Bres. R?zs?st?nk? galambgomba. Cap 4-7cm across, convex then flatter with a central depression; rosy pink to orange-rose, often with tiny whitish spots, fading with age; dry, dull, pruinose. Gills subdistant; white. Stem 30-60 x 5-l0mm, clavate; white speckled with rose-pink. Flesh soft; white. Odor pleasant. Taste mild. Spores ovoid, 7.5-9.5 x 6-8?; warts below 0.5?, high. Deposit deep yellow (E-F). Habitat under deciduous trees. Common. Found in Europe and eastern North America. Season July-September. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.)
Inedible
Russula persicina Krombh. Cap 4-13cm across, soon flattened and depressed; fleshy; bright red to scarlet or blood, even garnet red, often de-colored at center; glabrous; cuticle hardly peels. Gills thick, rather crowded; pale cream. Stem 25-80 x 10-25mm, fleshy; white, sometimes with a flush of pink, browning slightly with age. Flesh white. Odor distinctive. Taste mild at first, then somewhat acrid. Spores ovoid, 6.5-9.2 x 5.7-7.5?; warts up to 1?, high, isolated, with almost no connectives. Deposit cream (C-D). Habitat under beech and conifers. Apparently widespread. Found in eastern North America but rarely recorded. Season August-October. Not edible. Comment This is undoubtedly one of a number of species that have gone under the catchall name of Russula emetica, from which it differs in spore color and ornamentation.
Edible
Russula paludosa Britz. Apfelt?ubling L?pi galambgomba. Cap 4?14cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, red, blood-red, scarlet red, bay, apricot or ochre, sometimes with paler areas, fleshy, firm, slightly sticky when moist, half to three-quarters peeling. Stem 40?150 x 10?32mm, white or tinged pink in part or entirely, cylindrical, narrow club-shaped or swollen in the middle. Flesh white. Taste mild. Gills adnexed, rather pale creamy golden yellow, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print deep cream (E?F). Spores ovoid or elliptic with warts up to 0.7?1.2? high, joined by lines to form a somewhat incomplete network, 8?10.5 x 7?8?. Cap cystidia sparse, cylindrical, without septa, with a few granules staining in fuchsin, moderately reacting to SV. Habitat conifers. Season early summer to early autumn. Uncommon in Scotland, rare elsewhere. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula mutabilis Murr. Cap 3-5cm across, convex to depressed, margin striate-tuberculate; dull orange-brown to pale tawny, dull red where injured; surface viscid, not peeling readily. Gills adnate, broad, forked at base; pale yellow. Stem 30-50 x 10-13mm; dull ochre bruising deep blood red. Flesh firm; pale yellow. Odor fetid to aromatic. Taste unpleasant, acrid, or astringent. Spores subglobose, 8-10.5 x 7.5-9?; warts 0.9-1.4? high, large and blunt, isolated. Deposit cream (A-C). Habitat in grass, sandy soil under oak. Found in Florida and New Jersey. Season July-August. Not edible. Comment This appears to be the first published picture of this little-known species, which is distinctive by the whole mushroom drying blood red with age.
Inedible
Russula maculata Qu?l. Gefleckter T?ubling, Foltos galambgomba, Russule tachet?e. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, soon flattening and depressed, coral to pale pink, sometimes almost orange, often cream in part, especially the centre, frequently with rusty spots, peeling at the margin only, margin eventually furrowed. Stem 30?90 x 10?35mm, white, sometimes tinted pink, rusty spotted, browning. Flesh white. Taste sometimes hot, rarely mild, smell fragrant (cedarwood). Gills adnexed-free, palish ochre, forked, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre to ochre (G?H). Spores subglobose to ovoid with warts up to 1.2? high, isolated or mostly joined by lines to form a rather incomplete network, 8?10 x 7?9?. Cap surface hyphae tapering, cylindrical or swollen at the tip. Cap cystidia abundant, cylindrical, spindle-shaped or slightly club-shaped, without septa, reacting with SV. Habitat with deciduous trees. Season summer to autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Russula lundelii Sing. Grosser Weisstielt?ubling. Cap 8?15cm across, convex, later flattening or with a depression, orange scarlet, blood coloured, yellowish bay, reddish rust, brownish apricot or deep rosy wine-coloured, sometimes with ochre or yellowish areas, rather firm to almost hard, very fleshy, sticky when moist, one-third peeling. Stem 80?100 x 20?30mm, white, rarely tinted dull purplish, browning slightly on handling, hard. Flesh white. Taste bitter and more or less hot. Gills adnexed, deep saffron, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print ochre (H). Spores somewhat globose with warts up to 0.7?1? high, isolated, no lines, 7?8 x 6.5?7?. Cap cystidia sparse, cylindrical, reacting with SV. Habitat under birch. Season summer to early autumn. Uncommon ? mainly Scottish, but also recorded from S. England. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Russula granulata (Pk.) Pk. Cap 4-10cm across, convex with incurved margin, disc flattened with small crust-like patches and granules; pale orange-yellow to tawny; margin tuberculate-sulcate; viscid when wet. Gills adnate, close; pale yellow, often spotted brown. Stem 30-75 x 10-20mm, equal; often stained darker brown below; smooth. Flesh yellowish staining brown. Odor unpleasant. Taste oily-acrid. Spores ellipsoid, 5.7-8 x 4.4-6.3-; warts up to 1- high, isolated with very few connectives. Deposit pale orange-yellow (D-E). Habitat in mixed woodlands. Frequent. Found in northeastern North America to Michigan and Tennessee. Season July-September. Not edible.
Edible
Russula flavida Frost & Pk. Cap 3-8cm across, convex then plane; firm, fleshy; chrome yellow to orange-yellow; dry, velvety pruinose. Gills rather crowded; white then cream. Stem 35-80 X 10-15mm, equal, firm; colored like cap or a little paler. Flesh white. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores subglobose, 5-7 x 5.5-8.5-; warts up to 0.6-, high, with partial to complete reticulum. Deposit yellow (D-E). Habitat in deciduous woodlands. Occasional. Found in southeastern North America from New York south to Florida and west to Texas. Season July-September. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.)
Inedible
Russula compacta Frost. Firm Russula Cap 3-18cm across, convex with center flattened or depressed, margin smooth; whitish cream at first, soon turning yellow-orange to ochre with age or on bruising, finally completely rust brown; surface dry, dull, and can be scurfy-granular at center, often cracking; smooth and viscid when wet. Gills adnate, fairly crowded; white to pale cream-yellow, bruising rust-brown. Stem 20-100 x 12-30mm, becoming hollow, even; concolorous with cap but usually discolors less. Flesh very firm, brittle; white, flushing yellow with age or where eaten by insects. Odor strong, fishy, and unpleasant. Taste a little unpleasant. Spores broadly ovate, 7.5-9(9.9)x(5.5)6.3-7(8.6)?; with blunt, conic warts up to 1.2? high, usually isolated but with some faint connectives forming an incomplete network. Deposit white (A-B). Habitat in mixed woodlands. Common. Found in eastern North America, west to Michigan. Season August-September. Edible but rather poor. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Comment This very firm, large russula is easily distinguished by the increasingly unpleasant odor and the color change. The superficially similar Russula nigricans (below) lacks the odor and finally turns black.
Edible
Russula bicolor Burlingham Cap 4-8cm across, convex then flattened; surface copper red mixed with yellow-orange or pale ochre; smooth, viscid when wet; cuticle separable for one-quarter of radius. Gills sub-crowded, broad; white. Stem 30-70 x 10-20mm, spongy; white. Flesh white. Odor not distinctive. Taste acrid. Spores ovoid, 8-10 x (6)7-8?; warts less than 0.5?, almost no connecting lines. Deposit white (A). Habitat particularly under birch. Found in both eastern and western North America. Season August-September. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous)
Inedible
Ramaria longispora Marr & Stuntz Fruit body 4-18cm high, 2-9 wide; up to 6 slender dividing branches arising from the primary axes, sometimes hollow and slightly divergent, finely divided near the tips; branches light to deep orange, tips chrome yellow when young, becoming orange in maturity. Base 30 x 15mm, single, slightly bulbous or subcompound, consisting of up to 6 axes arising from a root-like structure; underground section white, yellow above, nonamyloid. Flesh fleshy-fibrous, becoming brittle when dry; same color as branches or paler. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores subcylindrical, ornamented with numerous distinct warts, 10-18 x 4-6?. Deposit apricot yellow. No clamps present. Habitat on the ground under western hemlock. Found in the Pacific Northwest. Season September-October. Edibility not known -avoid, many Ramarias can cause stomach upset. Robert Banks tells me he eats it, but I still advise caution, Ramarias are very difficult to identify with any certainty.
Inedible
Ramaria conjunctipes (Coker) Corner var.tsugensis Marr & Stuntz Fruit body 4.5-18cm high, 3-7cm wide; branches of individual fruit bodies slender, hollow, branching, compact, and almost parallel, divided near the tips; salmon- or peach-colored with a waxy, translucent quality, light yellow tips, faint mauve areas where bruised. Base generally a close cluster of up to 10 steeply tapered to slightly bulbous stems; underground portion white, covered with white matted hairs; nonamyloid. Flesh fleshy-pliable, rubbery, drying brittle and looking like translucent plastic; same color as fruit body. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores ovoid or ellipsoid, finely ornamented with linearly lobed warts, 6-10 x 4-6.5?. Deposit golden yellow. No clamps present. Habitat on the ground under western hemlock. Found in the Pacific Northwest. Season September-October. Edibility not known -avoid, many Ramarias can cause stomach upset. Robert Banks tells me he eats it, but I still advise caution, Ramarias are very difficult to identify with any certainty.
Edible
Ramaria araiospora var. araiospora Marr & Stuntz Fruit body 5-13cm high, 2-8cm wide; up to 6 branches coming from the base then branching repeatedly, most quite slender and forking at the tips; red fading to light red with red tips, becoming yellow or orange. Base 20-30 x 15mm, single, slightly bulbous; white or yellowish white discoloring brownish white; base covered with thin white matted hairs; nonamyloid. Flesh fleshy-fibrous becoming brittle; same color as fruit body. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores subcylindrical, ornamented with linearly lobed warts, 8-13 x 3-4.5?. Deposit yellowish. No clamps present. Habitat on the ground under western hemlock. Found in the Pacific Northwest and California. Season September-November. Edible-good. Comment Ramaria araiospora var. rubella Marr & Stuntz (left hand picture)has branches that are magenta-red with red or slightly paler tips which do not turn yellow. In other respects, it is very similar to var. araiospora.
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