Red or redish or pink Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
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Total mushrooms fount: 382

Inedible
Inonotus hispidus (Bull. ex Fr.) Karst. Pelzporling, Almafa rozsd?stapl? (tapl?) Polypore h?ris?e, Shaggy Bracket. Habitat: Commonly between 10-20ft on the trunks of ash, but seen on walnut sometimes, london and apple plane. Strategy: Parasitic creating simultaneous white rot. Value: Brittle fracture at point of decay. The probability of standing timber being created is wonderful for biodiversity Annual bracket ranging from: 6 to 25 cm across 4 to 12 cm wide 2 to 10 cm thick Fan-shaped, usually single but occasionally fusing with others into overlapping groups, surface felty-hairy varying from ochraceous to tobacco-brown, finally blackish and bristly. Red to brown and like velvet on top and usually growing independently. The bracket will blacken with age and finally drop off within the year, remaining on the ground below the tree for a long time. Spores exuded from red to brown pores. Tubes 10-20(50)mm long. Pores 2 - 3 per mm, circular to angular, pale ochraceous at first, later brown and glancing in the light. Spores rust, subglobose, 9?12?4?10m. Habitat usually on ash but commonly on other trees such as elm, apple and walnut. Season summer but persisting on the tree in blackened state throughout the year, annual ( Seen in October ). Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Clathrus archeri (Berk,) Dring Syn Anthurus archeri (Berk.) E. Fisher. Tintahalgomba, Tintenfischpilz, Octopus Stinkhorn. Fruit body growing from an egg shaped whitish volva 5 x 4cm, breaking into 4-8 starfish-like arms up to 10cm long, red to pink with the olivaceous-black spore bearing material on the inner side, odour strong and fetid with a hint of radish. Spores olive-brown average 5 x 2um. Habitat gardens and leaf litter. A native Australian fungus that is now found in both north America and Europe in warmer areas. Thanks to Geoffrey Kibby for the first photograph and to Mark Hampton for the second and Robert Corbyn for the third.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Telamonia) bulliardii (Fr.) Fr. Zinnoberroter Gürtelfuss Vöröslábú pókhálósgomba Cortinaire de Bulliard Hotfoot Webcap Cap 4–8cm across, convex then expanded, deep red-brown to chestnut drying ochre-buff. Stem 50–100 x 10–15mm, whitish near apex becoming rust towards the base and covered in reddish fibres. Flesh whitish, sometimes reddish at stem base. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills violaceous at first, soon rusty. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic, rough, 8–10 x 5–6µ. Habitat deciduous wood, especially beech. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility Suspect – avoid as many Cortinarius contain toxins. Found In Europe. edibility: Poisonous/Suspect fungus colour: Red or redish or pink normal size: 5-15cm cap type: Convex to shield shaped stem type: Bulbous base of stem spore colour: Rusty brown habitat: Grows in woods, Grows on the ground
Inedible
Ganoderma lucidum (Curt. ex Fr.) Karst. Gl-nzender Lackporling, Pecs-tviasz-tapl-, pecs-tviaszgomba, Ganoderme luisant, Ganoderme laque, Polypore lucide, Lacquered Bracket. Fruit body usually stalked. Bracket 10-25cm in diameter, 2-3cm thick, fan- or kidney-shaped, laterally attached, concentrically grooved and zoned ochraceous to orange brown, later purple-brown to blackish, and like the stem conspicuously glossy as if varnished. Stem up to 250 x 10-30mm, dark brown, glossy. Tubes 0.5-2cm long. Pores 4-5 per mm, circular, whitish then cream, finally tobacco brown, darkening on bruising when fresh. Spores rusty, ellipsoid-ovate with truncate end, 7-13 x 6-8um. Habitat on roots of deciduous trees. Season all year. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. ---- Habitat • Near or at the base, at the soil line, or attached to roots of living trees • On stumps and bases of dead trees, and sometimes from buried wood residues where trees have been removed Fruiting Time of Year • Summer through fall, turning black and persisting through to the following year Fruiting (Hymenial) Surface • White with small pores, 4-5 per mm, changing to brown with age Type of Decay • White root and butt rot Mode of Action • A moderately fast progressing root and butt rot The fungus can also kill cambial tissues and cause root death Frequency • Very common Tree Health Symptoms • Thin crowns • Dead branches • Yellowing leaves • Overall poor vigor • Some trees show no apparent health impacts from infection Edibility/Medicinal • Medicinal; used as an anti-inflammatory treatment • Sold in teas and pills in most oriental stores • Documented health benefits in medical literature Identifying Features (see adjacent photos) • Single or clusters of round to half-moon shaped conks usually attached directly to wood but occasionally with a lateral or central stem • 10 cm (4 in) up to 35 cm (14 in) across and 2.5 cm (1 in) or more thick • Cap or the top of the conk “varnished” red to mahogany with or without a white margin • Reddish-brown zonate interior or context • White pore surface that edges brown when fresh
Inedible
Ganoderma tsugae Murr. Hemlock Varnish Shelf. Fruit body annual. Cap 5-25cm across, kidney- or fan-shaped; reddish to maroon or brownish, margin often white or yellow; surface smooth to wrinkled with a shiny, lacquered appearance. Tubes up to 1.5cm deep; pale purplish brown. Pores 5-6 per mm, circular to angular; surface cream-colored bruising yellowish or brownish. Stem up to 30-150 x 15-30mm, usually lateral; reddish brown to mahogany or almost black; surface has a highly varnished crust. Flesh up to 5cm thick, upper part soft and spongy, lower part corky when dried; creamy-colored to bud, with a darker layer next to tubes. Spores ellipsoid, blunt at one end, with thick double wall, 9-11 x 6-8-. Deposit rust-brown. Hyphal structure dimitic; clamps present. Habitat singly or in clusters on dead or dying coniferous wood, especially hemlock and spruce. Found in eastern North America, California, and Arizona. Season May-November. Comment The similar Ganoderma lucidum (Curt. ex Fr.) Karsten grows on deciduous trees. Ganoderma curtisii (Berk.) Murr., which occurs in the South, is probably not a distinct species but a form of Ganoderma lucidum (see our picture with the younger specimens). It has a distinct, usually central stem, and the cap is pallid or bright ochre rather than red-brown.
Inedible
Tricholoma vaccinum (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer. Tricolome ?cailleux, Tricolome de vache, Zottiger Ritterling, Szak?llas pereszke, Agarico vaccino, Ruige ridderzwam, Scaly Knight. Cap 4?7cm across, slightly umbonate, flesh-brown, darker towards the centre, disrupting into woolly scales. Stem 30?45 x 8?12mm, fibrous, paler than cap. Flesh pallid to rosy, often hollow in stem. Taste bitter, smell mealy. Gills white at first, later pallid flesh-colour. Spore print white. Spores ovate, 5?7 x 4?5um. Habitat conifer woods. Season late summer to late autumn. Uncommon. Inedible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Tricholoma saponaceum (Fr.) Kummer. Soapy Knight or Soap Tricholoma, Tricolome ? odeur de savon, Seifenritterling, Szappanszag? pereszke, Agarico saponaceo, Zeepzwam. Cap 5?10cm across, convex at first then expanded with a broad umbo, grey-brown often with rusty or olivaceous tints, darker at the centre. Stem 50?100 x 10?30mm, white with reddish or olivaceous tints. Flesh white becoming more or less pink. Taste mushroomy, smell of soap. Gills rather distant, whitish sometimes with greenish tints or finally spotted reddish. Spore print white. Spores elliptical, 5?6 x 3.5?4um. Habitat in troops in deciduous or coniferous woods. Season late summer to late autumn. Occasional. Edible ? poor. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Note the first pictures shows a rather red form that will probably become a seperate variety, in fact this species contains a rather divers group of mushrooms that may well be split in the future. Comment Tricholoma saponaceum var. ardosiacum Bres. differs from the type in having a much darker, bluish-gray, almost black cap and sometimes gray or brown scales on the stem (the last of our pictures).
Inedible
Trichaptum biforme (Fr. in Klotzch) Ryv. Bracket 1-8cm across, semicircular, fan-shaped, flat; color variable in concentric zones, ochre to dark brown, white to grayish, brownish or black, violet margins; hairy becoming smooth. Tubes 1-l0mm deep. Pores 2-5 per mm, angular, becoming tooth-like; white to brownish with mauve tinge and mauve along the margin. No stem. Flesh 0.5-1.5cm thick; white to yellow. Spores cylindrical, smooth, 5-6.5 x 2-2.5?. Deposit white. Habitat numerous, single, or overlapping caps on dead stumps of trees of deciduous wood, reducing them to sawdust. Very common. Found widely distributed throughout North America. Season May-December, but often persisting all year. Not edible.
Edible
Stropharia rugosoannulata Farlow ex Murr. King Stropharia, Wine Cup, -ri-s harmatgomba. Cap 5-20cm across, convex-flattened to umbonate; deep purplish red to dull brown or even grayish or white with age; smooth, not viscid. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then gray and finally purple-brown. Stem 100-180x 10-25mm, equal to clavate; white; smooth; ring large, prominent, deeply wrinkled or segmented below, very thick, white. Flesh firm; white. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-13 x 7.5-9-. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on wood chips and bark mulch and around flower beds. Very common. Found Europe and widely distributed in northern North America. Season June-October. Edible-delicious. Comment An almost pure white form is not infrequent; also a closely related (probably undescribed) yellow species with viscid cap may be found at the same time.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia hornemannii (Fr.) Lundell Fenyves harmatgomba. Cap 6-15cm across, broadly convex umbonate; dull reddish brown or purple-brown, with white veil remnants at margin; very viscid when wet. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120x 10-20mm; white; strongly fibrillose-scaly below the prominent ring. Flesh white. Odor a little unpleasant. Taste a little unpleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-14 x 5.5-7?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on rotting conifer logs. Found in Europe and northern North America. Season August-November. Not edible- possibly poisonous.
Inedible
Stropharia aurantiaca (Cke.) Orton New syn. Leratiomyces ceres Orangeroter Tr?uschling T?glav?r?s harmatgomba, narancspiros harmatgomba Redlead Roundhead. Cap 1.5?5.5cm across, convex then expanded, orange-red with paler patches when dry, viscid when moist, margin often with whitish velar remnants. Stem 20?100 x 2?10mm, slightly thickened at base, whitish becoming streaked ochraceous or orange-red below. Flesh pale buff to concolorous. Gills whitish at first then olivaceous-clay. Pleurocystidia thin-walled, lanceolate with a sharp-pointed apex and yellowish contents. Cheilocystidia variable in shape, mostly thin-walled and lageniform often with flexuous necks, sometimes irregularly cylindric or clavate with a swollen or even capitate apex. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores elliptic, 11?13 x 6?7.5um. Habitat on rotting sawdust, usually in parks or gardens. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility unknown -avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Serpula lacrymans (Fr.) Karst. syn. Merulius lacrymans Schum. Dry Rot Fungus, Hausschwamm, K?nnyez? h?zigomba, Huiszwam. Fruit body 5?50cm across, usually resupinate but occasionally forming brackets on vertical substrates, arising from whitish, pinkish, lilac or grey mycelium. Flesh 2?12mm thick, greyish-white, spongy-fleshy. Pores rusty-yellow becoming more yellowish towards the thick, white sterile margin. Spores rust-brown, elliptic, 8?10 x 5?6um. The fungus gives off a distinctive damp rotten smell. Habitat on worked wood in buildings although the fruit bodies of the fungus may also appear on non-organic substrates such as plaster or brickwork. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Infection of wood occurs when it has become sodden for some long time following prolonged damp due to leaking roofs or pipes, either by spores or by vegetative mycelium spreading through brickwork. On germination of the spores the mycelia exhibit two distinct modes of growth. Firstly, numerous fine hyphae penetrate the wood, producing enzymes which break down the wood and enable the fungus to absorb nutrients; as the wood dries it cracks into cubical blocks and eventually disintegrates into brown powder. It is the second mode of growth which is most easily detected since it takes the form of thick mycelial cords and cottony sheets spreading over brickwork, metal, etc. enabling the fungus to travel over areas from which it cannot derive nutrients. The fruit bodies arise from these mycelial cords. Thios phoyograph was lent to me by Alan and Patie Outen.
Inedible
Scutellinia scutellata (L. ex St. Amans) Lamb. Common Eyelash S?rt?s cs?szegomba. Cup 0.2?1cm across, shallowly disc-shaped, inner surface bright orange-red, outer pale brown covered in stiff dark brown or black hairs up to 1,000? long and 40? wide towards the forked, rooting bases, narrowing towards the pointed apices, septate; visible without a lens as distinct ?eyelashed? rimming the margin. Asci 300 x 25?. Spores elliptical and with a roughened exterior, containing several small oil droplets, 18?19 x 10?12?. Habitat on damp soil or rotten wood. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Scleroderma cepa (Vaill.) Pers. Fruit body 1.5-9cm across, subglobose, flattened, or lobed; no stem or almost none, attached by a thick mass of tough, hairy mycelium. Peridium (outer skin) 1-3mm thick; when fresh, hard, quite tough; white in cross-section, becoming reddish or pinkish brown when cut. Surface whitish when young, becoming straw-colored to yellowish brown or leather brown, turning deep pinky-brown if rubbed; smooth becoming very finely cracked and scaly, especially on the top where exposed to light. Spore mass white and firm when young, soon becoming black or purple-black, then paler or browner and powdery. Odor none. Spores globose, spiny but not reticulate, 7-10 x 7-10-. Habitat singly, scattered, or in groups under deciduous and coniferous trees in woods, in gardens, and along roadsides. Common. Found widely distributed in North America. Season July-October. Poisonous.
Edible
Sarcoscypha coccinea (Fr.) Lamb syn. Peziza coccinea Fr. Scharlachroter Kelchbecherling Piros cs?szegomba. Cup 1?5cm across, cup-shaped, the margin becoming tattered as it expands, attached to substrate by a short stalk, inner surface bright scarlet, outer whitish and covered in white matted tufted hairs. Asci 400 x 16?, not blued by iodine. Spores cylindric-ellipsoid containing several small oil droplets, 24?32 x 12?14?. Habitat gregarious, on dead wood. Season early winter to early spring. Frequent especially in the West. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Sarcodontia setosa (Pers.) Donk Fruit body 5-20cm across, forming crust-like spreading patches on the surface of logs; often stained with wine-red areas. Fertile surface bright yellow, formed of downward pointed teeth or spines 5-l0mm long. Odor strong, very sweet-fruity to unpleasant. Taste mild. Spores teardrop shape, smooth, 5-6 x 3.5-4?. Habitat on logs or standing wood of fruit trees, especially apples. Rather uncommon. Found widely distributed in North America. Season July-October. Not edible.
Edible
Russula xerampelina Gemeiner Heringst-ubling Barnul-h-s- galambgomba Russule feuille-morte Crab Brittlegill Russula xerampelina (Schaeff. ex Secr.) Fr. (R. faginea Romagn. in part) Cap 5-14 cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, colours very varied, often mixed, dull purples, reds, wine-coloured, cinnamon, straw, fawn, brick or dull brown, moderately firm, sometimes hard, soon dry and matt; margin eventually furrowed, one-quarter peeling at most. Stem 30-110-10-30mm, white or tinted rose, staining honey to brownish ochre especially on bruising, firm to hard, reacting dull green when rubbed with iron salts. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell crab-like especially with age. Gills adnexed, pale to medium ochre, fairly broad and thick, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print deep cream to pale ochre (E-F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1.2m high, lines none or few, occasionally enclosing a mesh, 8-11-6.5-9m. Cap cystidia infrequent, mostly narrow, not reacting to SV. Cap hyphae with terminal cells sometimes club-shaped, and these and the supporting cells inflated. Habitat under broad-leaved trees, especially beech and oak. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Divided by some authorities into a number of different species and varieties.
Edible
Russula violeipes Qu?l. Lilastieliger T?ubling, Velvet Brittlegill. Cap 4?8cm across, somewhat globose at first, then flattening and finally with a depression, straw, greenish-yellow (forma citrina) or olive tints, often in part, sometimes entirely, livid red, livid purple, lilac or wine-coloured, thick-fleshed, hard, powdered, hardly peeling. Stem 40?70 x 10?30mm, white, often tinged yellow, violet, purple or wine-coloured, firm, often powdered especially above. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell slight, when fresh of shrimps. Gills slightly decurrent, pale buffy straw, greasy to the touch. Spore print cream (C?D). Spores ovoid with warts 0.7?1? high, joined by lines or ridges to form a fairly well-developed network, 6.5?9 x 6?8?. No cap cystidia and very few on the gills and not reacting to SV. Gill margin fringed with tapering cells. Terminal cells of cap hyphae mostly tapering, supporting cells mostly inflated, sometimes balloon-shaped. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to early autumn. Uncommon. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Found In Europe.
Edible
Russula vinosa Lindblad syn. Russula obscura Romell. Borv-r-s galambgomba. Cap 5-15cm across; pale to dark blood red or livid purple; peeling only at margin. Gills somewhat distant; pale buff. Stem 40-150 x 15-30mm; white, flushing grayish black when bruised or with age. Flesh white, blackening. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores ovoid, 8-10 x 6.5-9-; warts up to 0.5- high, no connectives. Deposit ochre (E-F). Habitat in conifer woods and boggy areas. Found in Europe and northeastern North America. Season July-August. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.)
Edible
Russula vesca Fr. Bare-toothed Russula, Russule comestible, Fleischroter Speiset-ubling, R-ncos galambgomba, r-ncost-nk- galambgomba, Rossola edule, Smakelijke russula. Cap 5-10cm across, somewhat globose at first, later flattened convex, rather variable in colour, often with pastel tints, from dark or pale wine-coloured to buff, sometimes with olive or greenish tints, fleshy, firm, the skin half peeling, tending to retreat from the margin leaving the underlying flesh visible. Stem 30-100 x 15-25mm, white, rather hard, often with somewhat pointed base. Flesh white. Taste mild, nutty. Gills adnexed, whitish to very pale cream, rather closely spaced, narrow, forked, especially near stem. Gills and stem surface rapidly deep salmon when rubbed with an iron salt. Spore print whitish (A). Spores ovoid with small warts up to 0.5- high, very occasionally with short lines attached or joining pairs, 6-8 x 5-6-. Cap cystidia cylindrical or spindle-shaped, without septa, hardly reacting to SV. Cap hyphae with cylindrical or tapering terminal cells or sometimes a long, tapering, thick-walled hair; supporting cells rectangular. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
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