Red or redish or pink Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 382

Edible
Russula turci Bres. Jodoform-T-ubling, J-dszag- galambgomba. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, soon flattening and with a depression, mauve, dark or dull purple, wine coloured, bay or dark fawny, paling in places, fleshy, sticky or even glutinous when moist, drying matt and often powdered, one third peeling. Stem 30-70 x 10-25mm, white, rarely tinged rose, becoming dirty or brownish, cylindrical or narrow club-shaped. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell of iodoform at stem base. Gills adnexed, saffron, with connecting veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre (G). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5- high, mostly joined by fine lines or ridges to form a well-developed network, 7-9 x 6-8-. Cap cystidia absent; hyphae with incrustations staining with fuchsin abundant. Habitat under conifers. Season early summer to autumn. Frequent in Scotland, rare in England. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula sardonia Fr. Zitronenbl?ttriger T?ubling, Citromlemez? galambgomba, Russule ?cre, Russule ? couleur de sardoine, Primrose Brittlegill. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, violet-, purplish- or brownish-red, greenish or ochre to yellowish, hard, shortly peeling only. Stem 30?80 x 10?15mm, sometimes white but usually entirely pale lilac to greyish rose, firm; surface as if powdered. Flesh white. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed to slightly decurrent, at first primrose, later pale golden yellow, narrow. Gills and flesh reacting rose with ammonia (distinguishes this species). Spore print cream (C?F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5? high, joined into ridges or by fine lines to form a rather poorly developed network, 7?9 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia spindle-shaped or cylindrical, without septa, strongly reacting to SV. Habitat under pine. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Found In Europe and western north America. Edibility suspect-not advisable.
Inedible
Russula sanguinea (Bull. ex St. Amans) Fr. Blut-T?ubling, V?rv?r?s galambgomba, Russule sanguine, Bloody Brittlegill. Cap 5?10cm across, convex, later flattening or saucer-shaped, blood to purplish-red or rose, often with whitish areas, fleshy, rigid or even hard, peeling at margin only; surface soon dry and matt, rough or veined. Stem 40?100 x 10?30mm, white, pink or red, firm. Flesh white. Taste slightly to moderately hot, also sometimes bitter. Gills adnate-decurrent, cream or pale ochre, narrow, forking or with cross-connections. Spore print pale to deep cream (C?F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1? high, with very few connecting lines, 7?10 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia cylindrical to narrow club-shaped, often teat-ended, with 0?2 septa, somewhat poorly reacting to SV. Habitat under conifers. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula pseudointegra Arn and Goris. Ockerbl?ttriger Zinnobert?ubling, Keser? galambgomba, Russule fausse Integra, Scarlet Brittlegill. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, later flattening, scarlet red to coral, sometimes with cream or whitish areas, fleshy, slightly sticky at first, later dry, sometimes slightly powdered, one- to two-thirds peeling. Stem 30?70 x 15?30mm, white. Flesh white. Taste slightly bitter, eventually with a suggestion of hotness, smell slightly of geranium with a touch of menthol. Gills free, pale golden yellow to saffron. Spore print pale ochre (F?G). Spores subglobose with warts up to 0.7? high, some isolated, mainly joined by fine lines forming a rather incomplete network, 7?9 x 6.5?8?. Cap cystidia absent, long, rather wide, hyphae with incrustations staining in fuchsin abundant. Habitat under broad-leaved trees especially oak on clay soils. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible but bitter -avoid. Found In Europe.
Edible
Russula olivacea (Schaeff. ex Secr.) Fr. Rosastieger Ledert-ubling, Olajbarna galambgomba, v-r-st-nk- galambgomba, Russule oliv-tre, Olive Brittlegill. Cap 6-16cm across, almost globose at first, later flattened or slightly depressed, often irregular, varying considerably in colour from straw, pale ochre, shades of olive or brown to dull purple or purplish-red, firm or hard, thick-fleshed, peeling up to one-third only; margin inrolled at first. Stem 50-100 x 15-40mm, white, usually tinged rose or entirely so, yellowing slightly or browning around base, fairly hard. Flesh white, taste mild, nutty. Gills adnexed, deep buffy straw, forking and with cross connections near stem. Spore print ochre (G-H). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1.5- high, not or occasionally joined by lines, 8-11 x 7-9-. Cap cystidia absent, hyphae with rectangular, barrel- or ampoule-shaped cells, the terminal one sometimes strongly inflated. Phenol solution turns stem livid purple. Habitat under beech. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Geriefter Weicht-ubling. Russula nauseosa (Pers. ex Secr.) Fr. Cap 2-7cm across, convex, later flattening and finally with a shallow depression, wine coloured to red or often pale, washed-out colours, greyish rose, pale brownish, dull yellowish or tinged greenish, thin-fleshed, fragile, easily peeling; margin often shallowly warty and furrowed. Stem 20-75 x 5-15mm, white, often tinged brownish or yellowish, often narrow club-shaped, soft, fragile. Flesh white, stem often hollow. Taste mild or slightly hot. Gills almost free, saffron, thin, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre to ochre (G-H). Spores ovoid to elliptic, with warts up to 1.2- high, isolated or occasionally with fine lines attached, 7-11 x 6-9-. Cap cystidia abundant, mainly club-shaped, with up to two septa. Habitat under conifers, possibly only in Scotland. Season late spring to early autumn. Rare. Edible - possibly best avoided due to its hot taste. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula lepida Fr. Harter Zinnobert-ubling, R-zs-s galambgomba, piros galambgomba, Russule jolie, Cul rouge, Rouget. Cap 4-10cm across, convex, later flattening or slightly depressed, red, often paler and white or yellowish white in places or occasionally entirely, fleshy, hard; surface matt, dry, sometimes as if powdered, hardly peeling. Stem 30-70 x 15-35mm, white or flushed pink or red in part or entirely, often club-shaped or swollen slightly in the middle, powdered. Flesh white. Taste mild, of cedarwood pencils, sometimes bitter, smell slightly fruity with a suggestion of menthol. Gills almost free, pale cream. Spore print pale cream (B-C). Spores almost globose with warts up to 0.5- high, joined by lines and ridges to form a well-developed network, 8-9 x 7-8-. Cap cystidia frequent, cylindrical, tapering, spindle-shaped or narrow club-shaped, not reacting with SV; hyphae staining in fuchsin also present but granules that stain are rather sparse and scattered. Habitat with deciduous trees especially beech. Season summer to early autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula integra Fr. Barn?sv?r?s galambgomba. Cap 6-15cm across, soon flattened-depressed; firm, fleshy; reddish brown to dull brown; smooth. Gills moderately spaced, broad; deep yellow. Stem 40-60 x 15-25mm, equal, firm; white or slightly yellowish at base. Flesh white. Odor pleasant. Taste mild. Spores broadly ovoid, 8-8.5 x 7?; warts up to 1? high, with almost no connectives. Deposit deep ochre (G). Habitat under beech and oak. Not common. Found in Europe and western and eastern North America. Season August-October. Edible - good. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous)
Inedible
Russula fragilis (Pers. ex Fr.) Fr. Fragile Russula, Russule fragile, Wechselfarbiger Speit?ubling, T?r?keny galambgomba, Colombina fragile, Broze Russula. Cap 2?5cm across, convex, then flattening or depressed, variable in colour, usually purplish or violet-tinted and rather pale, or purplish-red, purple-violet, olive-greenish, even lemon yellow, often with combinations of these, with a darker, paler or olive-tinted centre, thin-fleshed, usually delicate and fragile, three-quarters peeling. Stem 25?60 x 5?15mm, white, cylindrical to slightly club-shaped. Flesh white. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed, white to very pale cream, with tiny nicks along their edges. Spore print whitish (A?B). Spores somewhat globose with warts up to 0.5? high, joined by fine lines forming an almost complete network, 7.5?9 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia cylindrical to club-shaped, with 0?2 septa, reacting strongly with SV. Habitat under broad-leaved trees or conifers. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Russula emetica (Schaeff. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray. Sickener, Emetic Russula, Russule -m-tique, Colombe rouge, Kirschroter Speit-ubling, H-nytat- galambgomba, Colombina rossa, rossetta, Berijpte russula. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, later flattening or with a shallow depression, scarlet, cherry or blood red, sometimes with ochre-tinted to white areas, somewhat thin-fleshed, fragile, shiny, sticky when moist; skin easily peeling to show pink to red coloured flesh beneath, margin often furrowed when old. Stem 40-90 x 7-20mm, white, cylindrical or more usually somewhat swollen towards the base, fragile. Flesh white, red immediately beneath cap cuticle. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed to free, cream then pale straw. Spore print whitish (A). Spores broadly ovoid; with large warts, 1.2- high, connected by fine lines to form a large-meshed, almost complete network, 9-11 x 7.5-8.5-. Cap cystidia mostly narrowly club-shaped with 0-1 septa. Habitat under pines. Season summer to late autumn. Common. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula decolorans (Fr.) Fr. Orangeroter Graustielt?ubling, Tarkah?s? galambgomba, Russule d?color?e, Copper Brittlegill Cap 4.5?11cm across, subglobose at first then convex and flattening, finally with a depression, brownish red or orange, reddish sienna, tawny or cinnamon, staining black or brown, firm, sticky when moist, peeling at margin only; margin finally furrowed. Stem 45?100 x 10?25mm, white, greying strongly, firm, often with club-shaped base. Flesh thick, greying strongly on exposure. Taste mild. Gills adnexed, pale ochre, blackening, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print deep cream to pale ochre (E or F). Spores ovoid to elliptic with spines of various heights up to 1.5?, mostly isolated but some connected by thin lines to form a very incomplete network with only 1?2 meshes, 9?14 x 7?12?. Cap surface with numerous slightly club-shaped dermatocystidia with one or no septa. Habitat under conifers. Season summer to autumn. Uncommon in the UK ? confined to the Highland region of Scotland. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula cessans Pearson Cap 3-8cm across, soon flattened; deep crimson to purplish red, often darker at the center; smooth, dry; peels halfway. Gills fairly close; pale ochre. Stem 30-50 x 10-20mm, equal; white. Flesh white. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores broadly ovoid, 8-9 x 7-8-; warts 0.6-1-, high, many connectives forming a partial reticulum. Deposit deep ochre (G). Habitat under eastern white pine. Found in New Jersey. Season September-November. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Comment This collection agrees very well with the original description of Pearson and other British authors. Recent descriptions by European authors seem to include a much wider range of cap colors; they are possibly describing a mixture of species.
Edible
Russula aurea Pers. Syn. R. aurata (With.) Fr. Goldt-ubling, Aranyos galambgomba, Russule dor-e, Gilded Brittlegill. Cap 4-9cm across, globose at first, then flattening and finally with a depression, scarlet red, brownish coral, blood-coloured or reddish orange, often partly or entirely golden yellow, fleshy, firm, half peeling, sticky when moist, smooth; margin often furrowed when mature. Stem 30-80x10-25mm, white to pale yellow to pale golden yellow, firm then soft, cylindrical to somewhat club-shaped, often somewhat irregular, smooth. Gills adnexed-free, pale ochre, broad, fairly widely spaced, connected by veins at their bases; edge often yellow. Taste mild. Spore print ochre (H). Spores globose-ovoid with conical warts up to 0.7-1.5μ high, with thin to thick connecting ridges which form a partial network enclosing a few meshes, 7.5-9x6-8μ. Cap hyphae tapering, cylindrical, spindle-shaped or slightly club-shaped, with shortish cells; both dermatocystidia and hyphae staining in fuchsin absent. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to early autumn. Uncommon. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Rhodotus palmatus (Bull. ex Fr.) Maire syn. Pleurotus palmatus (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu-l. R-tlicher Adernseitling R-zs-s t-nkgomba. Cap 5-10cm across, convex then flattened, horizontal, clear pink at first later peach to apricot-coloured, distinctly wrinkled, margin inrolled; pellicle gelatinous, thick and tough, entirely separable. Stem 30-70 x 10-15mm, white to pinkish, covered in white fibrils, curved. Flesh whitish tinged pink to orange. Taste bitter, smell pleasant. Gills paler than the cap, interconnected. Spore print pinkish. Spores subglobose, finely warted, 5-7um in diameter. Habitat on elm logs or beams. Season early autumn to winter. At one time rare, but due to the abundance of dead elms now becoming quite frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Ramaria botrytis (Fr.) Ricken. Hahnenkamm R?zs?s (r?zs?s?g?) korallgomba, Clavaire chou-fleur, Rosso Coral. Fruit body 7?15cm high, 6?20cm wide, white at first becoming tan or ochraceous with pink, red or purplish tips, numerous thick, much-branched, crowded branches arising from stout stem (3?4 x 1.5?6cm). Taste and smell pleasant, fruity. Spores ochraceous, oblong-elliptic, longitudinally striate, 14?16(20) x 4.5?5.5?. Habitat terrestrial, in broad-leaved woods. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Edible with caution. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Plyporus cinnabarina Jacq. ex Fr. syn. Trametes cinnabarinus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Fr. Cinnabar Polypore, Polypore ou Tram-te rouge cinabre, Zinnoberschwamm, Cin-bertapl-, Vermiljoenhoutzwam. Fruit body 3-11cm across, 2-8cm wide, 0.5-1.5cm thick, semicircular or fan-shaped, leathery becoming corky when dried; upper surface covered in fine soft hairs when young, later smooth and slightly wrinkled, bright red or orange-red becoming less bright with age. Tubes 2-6mm long, pale orange. Pores 2-3 per mm, circular or angular, cinnabar- or saffron-red. Spores white, oblong-ellipsoid, 4.5-6 x 2-2.5um. Hyphal structure trimitic. Habitat on dead deciduous trees, especially cherry, beech and birch. Season autumn. Very rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Phellinus pini (Fr.) Ames. Feny-tapl- Pine Conk. Bracket 2-20cm across, 1-15cm thick; hoof-shaped, fan-shaped, or shelf-like; tawny to dark reddish brown or brownish black in age, with the margin often brighter; hard, crusty, rough or cracked, minutely hairy, generally curved. Tubes up to 6mm deep. Pores circular to angular; dingy yellow-tawny. Stem minute or none. Flesh tough; tawny to tan or ochre. Spores globose or subglobose, smooth, 4-6 x 3.5-5-. Deposit brown. Habitat singly or in rows on living or recently dead coniferous trunks. Common. Widely distributed in North America. Season perennial. Not edible. Comment A very destructive fungus that attacks the heartwood of living trees, resulting in "conk rot" causing more timber loss than any other fungus.
Inedible
Peniophora quercina (Fr.) Cke. Eichen-Rindenpilz T?lgyfa ter?l?gomba. Fruit body resupinate, forming ochraceous pink to purple grey patches 0.1?0.5mm thick which dry hard and brittle rolling away from the substrate and back on themselves to show the dark brown or black underside. Flesh relatively thick almost gelatinous, hyaline except for a narrow brownish zone adjacent to the substrate. Cystidia thick-walled, hyaline, fusiform, heavily encrusted with crystalline material, and often becoming buried as the hymenium thickens. Spores light red, curved cylindric, 8?12 x 3?4um. Habitat on dead branches of deciduous trees especially oak. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Omphalina pyxidata (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu--l. Selymes b-kagomba. Cap 0.5-2cm across, convex, deeply umbilicate; reddish brown, pinkish brown to yellowish; smooth and deeply radially fluted. Gills decurrent, widely spaced; brownish. Stem 10-30 x 1-2mm, paler than cap; smooth. Spores almond-shaped, 7-10 x 4.5-6--. Deposit white. Habitat in grass in sandy soils, subalpine to alpine. Found in Europe and western North America. Season July-September. Edibility not known -avoid.
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