Red or redish or pink Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
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Total mushrooms fount: 382

Inedible
Mycena renati Qu?l. Syn M. flavipes Qu?l. S?rgat?nk? k?gy?gomba. Cap bell-shaped, 1.5-4cm across dull pink, brown or ochre, gills whitish edges may show slight change of colour. Stem golden yellow to yellow-brown. Smell nitrous. Spores 7.5-10 x 4.5-6.5um. Found on rotting deciduous wood and stumps. Rare in Britain, much more common in eastern Europe. These photographs were given by Dr. Barth? Lor?nd from Hungary.
Inedible
Mycena pura (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer Rettich-Helmling Retekszag- k-gy-gomba Myc-ne pur Lilac Bonnet. Cap 2-5cm across, rather variable in size, convex with a broad umbo, varying shades of lilac or pink, lined at margin when moist, paler when dry. Stem 50-100 x 4-10mm, rigid, flushed pink, base covered in fine white fibres, Flesh white. Taste mild, smell radishy. Gills adnate, pink. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia bottle-shaped. Spore print white. Spores subcylindric, amyloid, 6-8 x 3.5-4um. Habitat in beech litter. Season summer to winter. Common. Said to be edible -avoid. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena pearsoniana Dennis ex Sing. syn. M. pseudopura (Cooke) Sacc. Fleischfarbener Helmling. Cap 1–3cm across, convex, flattening and turning up at margin, pale buff with violet pinkish tints, paler and lined at margin. Stem 30–50 x 2–3mm, pale flesh-coloured. Flesh thin at margin, brownish. Taste mild or slightly rancid, smell radishy. Gills horizontal, adnate with decurrent tooth, whitish flushed violet. Cheilocystidia numerous, thin-walled, cylindric with rounded apex. Spore print white. Spores pip-shaped, nonamyloid, 5–7?3.5–4.5m. Habitat on spruce debris. Season summer to autumn. Rare. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mycena maculata Karst. syn. M. parabolica (Fr.) Qu?l. s. Bres. Gefleckter Helmling Foltos k?gy?gomba. Cap 1?3cm across, convex expanding to bell-shaped with a distinct umbo, the margin becoming lined and upturned, grey-buff later stained rust. Stem 20?60 x 2?3mm, white at apex, grey-buff below, tinged rust with age, several stems fused together at the white downy base. Flesh very thin, whitish at first becoming tinged rust. Taste not distinctive, smell strongly mushroomy. Gills pale grey then tinged rust. Cheilocystidia pyriform, apex covered with relatively long filiform irregular processes. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 7?11 x 4?5um. Habitat in small clusters on stumps or logs of beech. Season autumn. Rare. Said to be edible -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena haematopus (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. M. cruenta (Fr.) Qu?l. Rotstieliger Helmling V?rz? k?gy?gomba Myc?ne ? pied rouge Burgundydrop Bonnet. Cap 2?4cm across, conical to bell-shaped, grey-brown with clay-pink tint, striate at margin when moist, drying light pink. Stem 40?100 x 2?3mm, grey-pink exuding a deep blood-red latex when broken, often fused together to form tufts. Flesh blood-red. Taste slightly bitter, smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, white becoming pale pink, often with darker edge. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia thin-walled with swollen base and an abrupt pointed apex. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid 7?10 x 5?6um. Habitat on old stumps. Season autumn. Occasional. Said to be edible -avoid. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Marasmius cohaerens (Pers. ex. Fr.) Cke. & Qu??l. Szarut?nk? szegf?gomba. Cap 1-3.5cm, convex-campanulate; dark yellowish brown to cinnamon, darker at disc; smooth, dry, or subhygrophanous at margin; tough, pliable, dry cap texture revives when remoistened. Gills adnexed, distant, broad; yellowish white to brownish at margin. Stem 20-75 x 0.75-3mm, long, slender; white pruinose at apex, yellow-brown below and reddish brown in lower half, with a basal pad of pale yellow or white mycelium; dry, very smooth and polished, pliant to cartilaginous or horny with age. Flesh pallid brown. Odor somewhat pungent, earthy. Taste none to slightly alkaline and with a bitter aftertaste. Spores subfusiform, smooth, (6)7-9.8(11) x 3-5.5??. Deposit white. Habitat in dense clusters or gregarious on decaying leaves, twigs, etc., in deciduous woods. Found widely distributed in North America. Season July-October. Edibility not known. Comment A drop of alkali (KOH) applied to the reddish areas of the stem turns green. However, this appears to be the first record of this reaction in this species.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lepiota crostata Kummer. L?piote cr?t?e, L?piote cr?pe, Kleiner Stinkschirmling, B?d?s ?zl?bgomba, Lepiota crestata, Stinkparasolzwam, Stinking Dapperling. Cap 2?5cm across, irregularly bell-shaped and umbonate, cuticle reddish-brown and soon broken up, except at centre, into small scales on a white silky background. Stem 20?35 x 3?4mm, white tinged flesh-colour; ring membranous and deciduous. Flesh thin, white. Taste pleasant, smell unpleasant, strongly fungusy. Gills white, becoming brownish with age. Spore print white. Spores bullet-shaped, dextrinoid, 6?7.5 x 3?3.5um. Habitat in woods, garden refuse or in leaf litter. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Edibility suspect ? avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. The collection on the blue background was made in America, but differs from European material in the much longer stem.
Edible
Leccinum quercinum (Pil?t) Green and Watling Eichen-Rotkappe T?lgyfa ?rdestin?ru (-tin?ru) Orange Oak Bolete. Cap 6?15cm, chestnut to date-brown, fibrillose scaly, becoming smooth and more rusty, margin overhanging the pores. Stem 110?180 x 20?35mm, pale brown to buff at apex with whitish scales becoming pale brown, stem whitish to buff towards base with whitish scales becoming rusty or purplish date, darkening on handling. Flesh white to cream rapidly pink or vinaceous in cap, more grey in the stem sometimes with a slight green flush in the base. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white to pale buff becoming vinaceous or cigar-brown. Pores small, similarly coloured. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform, 12?15 x 3.5?5um. Habitat with oak. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Edible. Found In Europe. The photograph with 12 specimens comes from Ted Green, thanks Ted.
Inedible
Lactarius zonarius (Bull. ex St. Amans) Fr. Bleicher Milchling, Beg-ngy-ltsz-l- tejel-gomba, Lactaire zon-. Cap 3.5-10cm across, convex with a central funnel-shaped depression, pale yellowish-buff at first with paler margin, later ochre-buff to reddish-ochre with several, indistinct, darker concentric bands, slightly sticky, margin inrolled and hairless. Stem 25-45 x 10-20mm, whitish to buff then ochre-buff, sometimes with indistinct spots. Flesh whitish, often hollow in stem. Gills decurrent, narrow and crowded, forked near the stem, yellowish-buff later ochre-buff. Milk white; taste very hot. Smell of geraniums. Spore print buff (E-F). Spores ovoid, warts mainly joined by ridges that tend to run across the spore, forming a partial network, 7-9.5 x 5-7.2-. Habitat deciduous woods, especially with oak. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Lactarius vellereus (Fr.) Fr. Fleecy Milkcap, Lactaire velout?, Samtiger Milchling, Pelyhes keser?gomba, Lattario vellutato, Schaapje. Cap 10?25cm across, convex and centrally depressed to widely funnel-shaped, margin incurved at first, white to cream becoming tinged yellowish-buff to pale reddish cinnamon in places, surface very shortly woolly. Stem 40?70 x 20?40mm, solid, concolorous with cap, shortly velvety. Flesh thick and firm. Gills decurrent, distant, narrow and brittle, pale ochraceous-cream. Milk white, abundant; taste mild. Spore print white (A). Spores elliptic with small warts connected by fine lines in an incomplete network, 7.5?9.5 x 6.5?8.5?. Habitat deciduous woods. Season late summer to early winter. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius torminosus (Schaeff. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray. Woolly Milkcap, Lactaire ? toison, Wolliger Milchling, Birkenreizker, Ny?rfa sz?rgomba, v?r?sbolyhos tejel?gomba, Peveraccio delle coliche, lappacendro malefico, Baardige melkzwam. Cap 4?12cm across, convex becoming funnel-shaped, margin inrolled and hairy, pale salmon buff to pale pink with deeper-coloured indistinct concentric bands. Stem 40?80 x 10?20mm, pale flesh-coloured to salmon, finely downy. Flesh white, soon hollow in stem. Gills slightly decurrent, narrow, pale flesh-coloured to pale salmon. Milk white; taste hot and acrid. Spore print yellowish-cream (C?D) with faint salmon tint. Spores oval with low warts connected by ridges forming a very incomplete network, 7.5?10 x 6?7.5 μ. Habitat woods and heaths, usually with birch. Season late summer to early autumn. Frequent. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Lactarius subdulcis (Pers. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray. Zimtbauner Milchling, ?desk?s tejel?gomba, Lactaire douce?tre, Mild Milkcap. Cap 3?7cm across, convex, later with a depression, sometimes with a small umbo, reddish brown, rusty or dark cinnamon, paling to buff, fairly rigid to flexible, surface matt, smooth to slightly wrinkled, margin incurved at first, sometimes slightly furrowed. Stem 30?70 x 6?13mm, cylindrical to slightly club-shaped, sometimes furrowed lengthwise, coloured as cap but paler above. Flesh white to buff, thin in cap. Gills adnate to slightly decurrent, whitish at first then rosy-buff with a slight vinaceous tinge. Milk white, plentiful, not turning yellow on a handkerchief; taste mild then slightly bitter. Spore print cream (C) with slight salmon tinge. Spores oval, with largish warts (1?) joined by mainly thinnish ridges to form a well-developed network, 7.5?9.5 x 6.5?8?. Cap surface of prostrate, filamentous hyphae with variously inflated cells. Habitat in broad-leaved woods especially beech. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Lactarius rufus (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Rufous Milkcap, Lactaire roux, Fuchsfarbener Milchling, R-t tejel-gomba, r-t keser-gomba, Lattario fulvo, Rossige melkzwam. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, later flattening, finally with a central depression, the centre usually with a pointed umbo, red-brown, bay or dark brick, moderately thick-fleshed, breaking fairly easily, surface dry and matt, margin somewhat inrolled at first. Stem 40-80 x 5-20mm, concolorous with cap but paler. Flesh white, stem often hollow when old. Gills somewhat decurrent, brittle, yellowish at first, later as cap but paler. Milk white; taste mild then after about a minute very hot and acrid. Spore print creamy whitish (B) with slight salmon tinge. Spores elliptic, warts occasionally isolated but mainly connected by thin ridges to form a rather incomplete network, 8-9.5 x 6.5-7.5-. Habitat under pine. Season late spring to late autumn. Very common. Not edible although in some areas used as a seasoning after special treatment. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Comment Lactarius rufus var. parvus Smith & Hesler is darker in color when wet, and the habitat seems to be confined to conifer logs, the third of my pictures shows this var.
Edible
Lactarius quietus (Fr.) Fr. Oak Milkcap, Lactaire modeste, Eichenmilchling, V?r?sbarna tejel?gomba, Kaneelkluerige melkzwam. Cap 3?8cm across, convex, later flattened or with a shallow depression, dull reddish brown with cinnamon tints, often with a few indistinct darker concentric bands or spotting, or dry and matt, not sticky when moist. Stem 40?90 x 10?15mm, coloured as cap or darker, more or less cylindrical, often lengthwise furrowed, matt. Flesh whitish buff, thick and firm in cap often hollow in stem. Gills slightly decurrent, brownish white, later pale reddish brown with a slight mauvy bloom. Milk white or slightly creamy; taste mild or slightly bitterish. Smell slightly oily or suggesting bugs. Spore print cream (C) with slight salmon tinge. Spores oval, warts mostly joined by ridges forming a well-developed network, 7.5?9 x 6.5?7.5?. Habitat under oak. Season autumn. Very common. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Lactarius hepaticus Plowright apud Boud. Sp?ter Milchling, K?sei tejel?gomba, Liver Milkcap. Cap 2.5?7cm across, convex, late flattened, sometimes with a central pimple, liver coloured to dull chestnut, surface dry and matt, margin often crimped or crisped with tiny lobes. Stem 30?70 x 4?8mm, reddish brown to brick-coloured. Flesh white tinged pinkish-buff, thin in cap stem becoming hollow. Gills slightly decurrent, pale buff, later deep buff to pale ochre with a mauvy bloom. Milk white, drying yellowish, a drop on a handkerchief turns sulphur yellow in one to two minutes; taste bitter and acrid, slowly slightly hot. Spore print cream (B). Spores broadly elliptic, with large warts, some isolated but mostly joined by thin to thickish ridges in a very incomplete network, 8?9 x 6?7?. Habitat under pine. Season autumn. Common under pines in Southern Britain becoming rarer northwards. Not edible. Found In Europe and in northern North America.
Edible
Lactarius deliciosus (L. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray. Saffron Milkcap, Lactaire delicieux, Vache rouge, Edelreizker, ?zletes rizike, Lappacendro buono, sanguinino, Oranjegroene melkzwam, Pinetell. Cap 3?10cm across, convex then shallowly funnel-shaped, with numerous small purplish-brick to salmon blotches arranged in narrow, concentric bands on a pale flesh or rosy buff background, becoming tinged greenish in places, slightly sticky, firm, brittle, margin incurved at first. Stem 30?60 x 15?20mm, pale buff or vinaceous to orangy or salmon, sometimes with darker, shallow, spot-like depressions, becoming green in places. Flesh pale yellowish, carrot in places from the milk (after one hour or so) fading and finally dull greyish green. Gills slightly decurrent, closely spaced, pale pinkish apricot to saffron, becoming carrot and slowly dull pistachio green on bruising. Milk carrot; taste mild or slightly bitter. Spore print pale ochre (F). Spores elliptic, with thin to thickish ridges forming a fairly full network, 7?9 x 6?7?. Habitat under pines or spruce. Season summer to autumn. Uncommon in England, more frequent in Scotland. Edible and much esteemed in Spain.(Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Lactarius chrysorrheus Fr. Goldfl-ssiger Milchling, S-rgatej- tejel-gomba, Lactaire - lait jaune, Yellowdrop Milkcap. Cap 3-8cm across, convex with a funnel-shaped depression, pale salmon to rosy or ochre-buff with darker rings of watery blotches or narrow concentric bands, smooth, margin hairless, incurved at first then straightening. Stem 30-80 x 9-20mm, cylindrical or with a slightly swollen base, whitish to pale buff, often flushed pinkish below. Flesh pallid to whitish becoming sulphur yellow from the milk, stem hollow. Gills decurrent, crowded, buff tinged pink. Milk white, abundant, becoming sulphur yellow in five to fifteen seconds; taste slowly bitterish and somewhat hot. Spore print creamy white (A+) with slight salmon tinge. Spores oval with an incomplete network of ridges, 7-8.5 x 6-6.5-. Habitat with oak in Europe, in groups in hardwood and mixed forests and under conifers in North America. Season summer to autumn. Occasional Europe. Widely distributed throughout North America. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Cke. syn. Clitocybe laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Kummer. Deceiver, Clitocybe laqu?, R?tlicher Lacktrichterling, Fopzwam, H?sbarna p?nzecskegomba. Cap 1.5?6cm across, convex then flattened, often becoming finely wavy at the margin and centrally depressed, tawny to brick-red and striate at the margin when moist drying paler to ochre-yellow, surface often finely scurfy. Stem 50?100 x 6?10mm, concolorous with cap, tough and fibrous, often compressed or twisted. Flesh thin reddish-brown. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pinkish, dusted white with spores when mature. Spore print white. Spores globose, spiny, 7?10m in diameter. Habitat in troops in woods or heaths. Season summer to early winter. Very common but very variable in appearance and therefore often difficult to recognize at first sight, hence the popular name ?Deceiver?. Edible but not worthwhile. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Comment Laccaria laccata var. pallidifolia (Pk.) Pk. Differs from the type form in its very pallid, whitish gills and generally smaller stature.
Inedible
Laccaria bicolor (Maire) Oroton syn. L. proxima var. bicolor (Maire) K?hn. & Romagn. Zweifarbiger Lacktrichterling, Tweekleurige fopzwam, K?tsz?n? p?nzecskegomba, Bicoloured Deceiver. Cap 2?4.5cm across, convex then flattened, often centrally depressed and incurved at the margin, ochraceous-tan drying pinkish to ochraceous-buff, surface scurfy. Stem 50?140 x 4?10mm, ochraceous-buff to rusty-tan, fibrillose, with distinctive lilac down covering the lower third. Flesh thin, whitish tinged pinkish to ochraceous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pale lilac at first becoming clay-lilac and finally pallid. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptic to subglobose, spiny, 7?9.5 x 6?7.5m. Habitat in mixed birch and pine woods. Season late summer to autumn. Uncommon. Edible ? not worthwhile (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Found In Europe and reported it from north America.
Inedible
Laccaria altaica Singer syn. Laccaria striatula of many authors Cap 1-4cm across, convex then soon flattened; flesh-pink, pinkish brown, to reddish; dry. Gills adnate, thick, widely spaced; pinkish. Stem 20-50 x 2-4mm; pinkish brown: fibrillose. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores almost round, 9-12.5(13) x 9-12.5 (13)?. Deposit white. Basidia both 2- and 4-spored. Habitat riverbanks and wet, marshy areas. Rather common. Found in northern North America. Season July-October. Said to be edible, I would avoid.
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