Red or redish or pink Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
Normal size:
Location:
Flesh:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Text:

Total mushrooms fount: 382

Edible
Kuehneromyces mutabilis (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Sing. & Smith syn. Galerina mutabilis (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Orton syn. Pholiota mutabilis (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Kummer Stockschw?mmchen ?zletes t?kegomba Pholiote changeante Sheathed Woodtuft. Cap 3?6cm across, convex then expanded and usually umbonate, bright orange-cinnamon when moist drying pale ochraceous from the centre and often appearing distinctly two-coloured. Stem 30?80 x 5?10mm, whitish above becoming darker tan to blackish towards the base, scaly below the ring. Flesh white tinged brownish. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pallid at first later cinnamon. Spore print deep ochre. Spores ovoid to slightly almond-shaped with germ-pore, 6?7.5 x 4?5um. Habitat in dense clusters on stumps or trunks of deciduous trees. Season spring to early winter. Common. Edible ? good. Take great care not to confuse this species with other smallish brown poisonous fungi. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Inocybe jurana Pat. Schuppiger Risspilz, Inocbye du Jura, Borv?r?s susulyka. Cap 2?6cm across, conical to bell-shaped, buff with radiating darker brown fibres radiating from the centre, soon flushed reddish brown or sometimes vinaceous-purple; note, the black patches on the caps are mould. Stem 20?60 x 4?10mm, white soon reddish, base slightly swollen. Flesh white becoming flushed pink in cap and stem base. Taste mild or mealy, smell strongly mealy. Gills adnate or free, white at first then tinged clay, edge white at first then tinged clay, edge white. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, clavate, without apical encrustation. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores smooth, bean-shaped, 10?15 x 5?7?. Habitat deciduous or mixed woods especially beechwoods on chalk. Season autumn. Uncommon. Not edible, most Inocybes have been found to contain toxins. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Hypoxylon fragiforme (Pers. ex Fr.) Kickx. Roestbruin kogelswammetje, Beech Woodwart, V?r?ses ripacsgomba. Fruit body 0.1?1cm across, gregarious, hemispherical, bright salmon-pink at first becoming brick-red and later blackening, with a finely warted surface. Flesh hard, blackish. Asci cylindrical, 150 x 8?. Spores dark brown, subfusiform, containing one to three oil drops, 11?15 x 5?7?. Habitat dead beech. Season late summer to early spring. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Hypholoma sublateritium (Fr.) Qu?l. Syn. Naemateloma sublateritium (Fr.) Kar. Brick Caps, Hypholome presque brique, Ziegelroter Schwefelkopf, Falso chiodino, V?r?ses k?nvir?ggomba, Rode zwavelkop. Cap 3?10cm across, convex, brick red to reddish-brown at centre on ochraceous ground often with fibrillose remnants of veil towards margin. Stem 50?180 x 5?12mm, pale yellow near the apex becoming ochre brown towards the base, and with a cortinal zone near the apex. Flesh pale yellowish, reddish-brown towards stem base. Taste bitter, smell mushroomy. Gills pale yellowish becoming olive-brown. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hair-like. Pleurocystidia clavate with beak-like apex. Spore print purplish-brown. Spores elliptic with an indistinct pore, 6?7 x 3?4.5um. Habitat stumps of deciduous trees. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Hygrophorus russula (Fr.) Qu?l. V?r?sfoltos csigagomba. Cap 5-12cm across, broadly convex with an inrolled margin, expanding to nearly flat; pink to purple-red (on disc); sticky then dry and often streaked with small, purple-pink fibers, giving the cap a scaly appearance, sometimes bruising yellowy. Gills adnate, close to crowded, moderately broad, waxy; white then pale pink and spotted purple-red. Stem 20-70 x 15-35mm dry, smooth, solid, sometimes tapering toward the base; white streaking pinkish. Flesh thick, firm; white tinged pink. Odor mild. Taste mild. Spores ellipsoid, nonamyloid, 6-8 X 3-5?. Deposit white. Habitat scattered, gregarious, and sometimes in fairy rings under oak and sometimes conifers. Found widely distributed in North America and somewhat abundant in the East also in Europe. Season August-December (November-February in California). Edible-good.
Edible
Hygrocybe punicea (Fr.Fr.) Kummer Syn. Hygrophorus puniceus (Fr.) Fr. Crimson Wax Cap, Hygrophore rogue ponceau, Gro-er Saftling, Igroforo rosso sangue, Granaatbloemwasplaat, V-r-s ned-gomba. Cap 3-7cm across, irregularly bell-shaped and often lobed, deep blood-red when fresh, soon fading to orange-red, greasy. Stem 50-120 x 6-20mm, yellow flushed with red, white towards the pointed base, the surface covered in coarse fibres. Flesh white at base and in centre of stem, concolorous or yellow under the cuticle, stem becoming hollow. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills adnexed, yellowish later becoming flushed with cap colour. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptical, 9-12 x 5-6um. Habitat amongst short grass in fields and heaths. Season autumn. Rare. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distinguished from the more common H. coccineus by its larger size and the base of the coarse stem being white. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hygrocybe ovina (Bull. ex Fr.) K-hn. syn. Hygrophorus ovinus (Bull. ex Fr.) Fr. Schaf-Saftling Hygrophore des moutons Blushing Waxcap. Cap 2-8cm across, conico-convex, irregularly expanding and often broadly umbonate, dark sepia with yellowish-brown margin when fresh, drying pale sepia. Stem 30-60 x 6-20mm, often compressed, dark grey-brown. Flesh grey-brown. Taste strong and unpleasant, smell nitrous, or occasionally none. Gills dark sepia, discolouring bright reddish on bruising, as do cap and stem. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptic to ovoid, 7-9 x 5-6.5um. Habitat singly or in small tufts in grass. Season late summer. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mennigroter Saftling Vermilion Waxcap Hygrocybe miniata (Fr.) Kummer syn. Hygrophorus miniatus (Fr.) Fr. Apr- (m-niumv-r-s) ned-gomba. Cap 0.5-1.5cm across, convex, bright scarlet, finely scurfy. Stem 20-50 x 2-5mm, concolorous with cap or more orange, smooth and shiny. Flesh thin, orange-red. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, yellow to vermillion or orange-red with paler yellow edge. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid to egg-shape, 7.5-10 x 5-6um. Habitat in grassy clearings in woods or on heaths. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edible but not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distinguished from the other small, bright red species in this genus by its dry scurfy cap. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hygrocybe conica (Scop. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Hygrophorus conicus (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Blackening Waxcap, Hygrophore conique, Kegeliger Saftling, Igroforo conico, Zwartwordende wasplaat, Feketed? ned?gomba. Cap 2?5cm across, acutely conical and often irregularly lobed, yellow-orange sometimes flushed scarlet becoming black when bruised or with age. Stem 20?60 x 8?10mm, bright yellow and blackening. Flesh pale yellow, bruising black. Taste and smell none. Gills sinuate, pale yellow. Spore print white. Spores broadly ellipsoid, 7?9(10) x 4?5(6)um in four-spored form but 9?12 x 6?8m in two-spored form. Habitat amongst grass in fields, lawns and roadsides. Season summer to late autumn. Frequent. Edible ? not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Hygrocybe coccinea (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Hygrophorus coccineus (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Fr. Scarlet Waxcap, Hygrophore cochenille, Scharlachroter Saftling, Igroforo Rosso, Scharlaken wasplaat, Piros ned?gomba. Cap 2?4cm across, bell-shaped, scarlet blood-red, slimy at first. Stem 20?50 x 3?10mm, concolorous with cap but yellow towards the base, often becoming compressed. Flesh yellow-red, hollow in stem. Taste and smell faint, not distinctive. Gills adnate with a decurrent tooth, yellow when young later blood red with yellowish edge. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid to almond-shaped, often slightly constricted, 7?9.5 x 4?5um. Habitat amongst grass in fields. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible ? good. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Hygrocybe cantharellus (Schw.) Murr. syn. Hygrophorus cantharellus (Schw.) Fr. Pfifferlings- Saftling Goblet Waxcap. Cap 0.5?4cm across, convex, slightly scurfy-scaly, scarlet becoming vermillion and often yellowish at the wavy margin. Stem 30?70 x 1?3mm, orange at apex, concolorous with cap below. Flesh orange. Gills deeply decurrent, pale yellowish becoming deep egg-yellow. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, 8?10 x 5?6um. Habitat amongst damp moss. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility unknown -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Hygrocybe calyptraeformis (B. & Br.) Fayod syn. Hygrophorus calyptraeformis (B. & Br.) Rosenroter Saftling Pink Waxcap R?zsasz?n? ned?gomba. Cap 3?6cm across, acutely conical, expanding and splitting radially, dusky-pink when moist drying whitish-pink. Stem 60?120 x 8?10mm, white, sometimes flushed pink at apex, brittle, often splitting longitudinally. Flesh pink in cap, white in stem. Taste mild, smell not distinctive. Gills pale pink. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, 6?8 x 4.5?6um. Habitat amongst grass in pastures and heaths. Season autumn. Rare. Edible ? not recommended. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Gyromitra infula (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Cs?csos papsapkagomba, p?sp?ks?veggomba. Cap 3-10cm across, saddle-shaped or 3-lobed, with an incurved margin; reddish brown to dark brown; wrinkled to convoluted. Stem 10-60 x 20mm, hollow, sometimes irregular; whitish to buff. Flesh brittle. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, containing 2 large oil drops, 19-23 x 7-8?. Habitat singly or scattered on humus and rotting wood or debris. Common. Found widely distributed throughout North America. Season July-October (November-April in the West). Poisonous.
Poisonous/Suspect
Gyromitra gigas (Krombh.) Qu?l. Snowbank False Morel ?ri?s papsapkagomba. Cap 4-15cm across and high, brain-like, round to ellipsoid, with an irregularly lobed margin that is sometimes fused to the stalk; yellow-brown to tan, more reddish brown in age; deeply convoluted and wrinkled, interior chambered; undersurface whitish. Stem 5-10cm long and wide; thick and short; interior multi-channeled or folded in cross-section; surface whitish; ribbed, wrinkled, or grooved. Flesh brittle. Spores ellipsoid, smooth or finely warted, 24-36 x 10-15?. Habitat singly or in groups on soil or humus under conifers around melting snowbanks. Often common. Found in mountainous forest areas from the Rocky Mountains westward to the Pacific and in Europe. Season May-June. Not edible-contains toxis hydrazines.
Poisonous/Suspect
Gymnopilus penetrans (Fr. ex Fr.) Murr. syn. Flammula penetrans (Fr. ex Fr.) Quid. Geflecktbl-tteriger Tannenfl-mmling Common Rustgill Foltoslemez- l-nggomba (t-kegomba). Cap 2-5cm across, bell-shaped to convex then flattened, often with a wavy margin; chrome yellow to golden then tawny and fading yellowish in age; smooth. Gills adnate, close, moderately broad; gold or yellowish white becoming tawny-spotted. Stem 40-60 x 4-7mm, sometimes enlarged toward base; yellowish; base whitish with downy hairs. Veil white, fibrous; leaves no ring. Flesh whitish. Odor none or mild. Taste bitter. Spores ellipsoid, warted 7-9 x 4-5.5- Deposit orange-brown. Cheilocystidia present; no pileocystidia; clamp connections present. Habitat singly or in small tufts on hardwoods and conifers. Found throughout North America. Season July-October. Not edible, some species of Gymnopilus can be deadly poisonous.
Inedible
Gomphidius roseus (Fr.) Karst. Rosy Spike, Rosa Schmierling, R-zsaszin ny-lk-sgomba, Gomphide rose, Rozsaszin ny-lk-sgomba. Cap up to 5cm across, coral becoming more brick with age, convex at first then flattened, very viscid. Stem 25-45 x 4-10mm, whitish flushed with pink or vinaceous tint, the white glutinous veil leaving an indistinct ring zone. Flesh dirty white tinted coral, occasionally dirty yellow in stem base. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills deeply decurrent, greyish, finally mouse-grey with olivaceous tinge. Spore print fuscous black. Spores subfusiform 15.5-17.5(20) x 5-5.5um. Habitat with conifers, especially pines. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edible but not recommended. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Gloeophyllum sepiarium (Wulf. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Lenzites sepiaria (Wulf. ex Fr.) Fr. Zaunbl-ttling Cifra lemezestapl- (tapl-) Conifer Mazegill. Bracket 2-3cm across, 5-12cm wide, 0.5-1cm thick, fan-shaped and often in tiered groups, corky; upper surface coarsely concentrically ridged and radially wrinkled, softly hairy at first later bristly, indistinctly zoned maroon to rusty darkening with age towards the point of attachment, lighter, even bright rusty-orange near the margin. Flesh rusty-brown. Taste and smell slight and not distinctive. Gills densely and radially arranged and often fusing together irregularly giving a maze-like appearance, light ochraceous-rust drying tobacco-brown. Spores white, cylindric, 9-12.5 x 3-4.5um. Habitat on coniferous trees or timber causing an intensive brown rot which rapidly destroys the infected wood. Season all year, annual. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Ganoderma resinaceum Boud. ex Pat. syn. Fomes resinaceus (Boud.) Sacc. Lacquered Bracket, Harziger Lackporling, Harslakzwam. Bracket 10?45cm across and up to 10cm thick behind, semicircular, sessile, or on a thick rudimentary stem; upper surface concentrically grooved, strikingly glossy as if varnished, red-brown or maroon to almost black, margin obtuse and cream-coloured. Flesh soft, pale wood-coloured. Tubes 5?20mm long, rusty-brown. Pores 2?2.5 per mm, circular, pale greyish bruising brown. Spores brown, ellipsoid-ovate and truncate at one end, 9?11 x 5?7um. Hyphal structure trimitic; generative hyphae with clamp-connections. Habitat on stumps of oak. Season all year. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Choice
Flammulina velutipes (Curt. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Collybia velutipes (Curt. ex Fr.) Kummer. Velvet Shank,Collybie a pied veloute, Samtfussr?bling, T?li f?l?ke, Fungo dell'olmo, Fluweelpootje, Enoki, Enokitake. Cap 2-10cm across, convex at first then flattened, tan-yellow darkening towards the centre, smooth and slimy. Stem 30-10 x 4-8mm, tough and cartilaginous, yellowish at apex, dark brown and densely velvety below. Flesh thin, concolorous. Taste and smell pleasant. Gills pale yellow. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia present. Cap cuticle 'cellular' of irregular clavate elements with elongated narrow processes and conspicuous, fusiform, somewhat thick-walled dermatocystidia. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, 6.5-10 x 3-4mu. Habitat in clusters on decaying deciduous trees, especially elm. Season late autumn to spring; can survive being frozen solid and on thawing produces more spores. Common. Edible and good. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. This mushroom is often sold in a cultivated form as Enokitake, the reason that it does not resemble the wild form is that it is grown entirely in the dark.
Choice
Fistulina hepatica Schaeff. ex Fr. Beefsteak Fungus or Ox Tongue, Langue de boeuf, Fistuline h?patique, Leberpilz, M?jgomba (tapl?), Lingua di bue, Biefstukzwam. Bracket 8-25cm across, 2-6cm thick, usually single, tongue-shaped or semicircular; upper surface pinkish to orange-red and finally purple-brown; rough with rudimentary pores, especially toward the margin; moist to tacky. Tubes up to 15mm deep; arising free, but adhering in maturity; whitish or yellowish. Pores 3 per mm, circular; whitish at first, bruising reddish brown. Stem none or rudimentary; short, thick, blood red. Flesh thick, succulent; mottled, dark flesh-pink with lighter veining, with bloodlike sap; reminiscent of raw meat. Odor pleasant. Taste sourish. Spores ovoid, smooth, 4.5-6 x 3-4?. Deposit pinkish salmon. Habitat singly or sometimes several in a cluster on the base of living oaks or chestnuts, also dead hardwood stumps. Frequent; common in the East. Common in Europe and found in North America especially eastern areas. Season July-October. Edible-good. Comment Infected oak timber has a much richer, darker color and is much sought after by furniture makers.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
...
18
19
20