Grows on wood Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
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Total mushrooms fount: 383

Inedible
Paxillus panuoides (Fr.) Fr. syn. Tapinia panuoides Sutara Muschelkrempling Nyeletlen c?l?pgomba. Cap 1?6cm across, ochraceous to buff or fulvous, downy and often with lilac tomentum especially toward the point of attachment. Stem up to 10mm, entirely absent or rudimentary and lateral. Flesh ochraceous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills decurrent, crowded, branched and wavy, pale buff bruising darker. Spore print ochraceous rust. Spores ellipsoid, 4?5.5 x 3?4um. Habitat on conifer debris, causing the infected wood to become soft and discolour bright yellow. Season late summer to late autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Poisonous/Suspect
Paxillus atrotomentosus (Fr.) Fr. Syn Tapinella atromentosus Sutara Samtfusskrempling B?rsonyost?nk? c?l?pgomba Paxille ? pied noir. Cap 12?28cm across, snuff-brown or sepia with sienna patches, depressed in the centre, margin inrolled, slightly downy. Stem 30?90 x 20?50mm, sometimes lateral, rooting, covered in a fine olivaceous buff down which becomes more coarse, velvety and dark brown with age. Flesh cream, ochre or buff in stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills crowded, joining to give a vein-like network near the stem. Spore print sienna. Spores ellipsoid, 5?6.5 x 3?4.5um. Habitat tufted on stumps of conifers, were it causes brown rot. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible, Suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Inedible
Panellus stypticus (Bull. ex Fr.) Karst. syn. Panus stipticus (Bull. ex Fr.) Eichen Zwergkn?ueling Kis ?ld?csk?gomba Pane stiptique Bitter Oysterling. Note stypticus is also spelt stipticus by some authors. Cap 1?3cm across, kidney-shaped, pale ochre-brown to cinnamon, minutely scurfy. Stem 5?20 x 2?5mm, lateral, tapering towards the base, concolorous with cap or paler. Flesh whitish to pale yellowish. Taste bitter. Gills pale cinnamon. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, amyloid, 3?6 x 2?3um. Habitat often in crowded tiers on dead branches or stumps, especially of oak. Season all year. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Note the spelling of stipticus
Edible
Panellus serotinus (Schrad. ex Fr.) K?hn. syn. Pleurotus serotinus (Schrad. ex Fr.) Kummer Gelbstieliger Zwergkn?ueling S?rgat?nk? d?csk?gomba Olive Oysterling. Cap 3?7(15)cm across, kidney-shaped, ochre to olive-green, tacky in wet weather. Stem 10?25 x 8?15mm, lateral or rudimentary, yellowish covered in minute brownish scurfy scales. Flesh white with a gelatinous layer below the cap cuticle. Gills pale yellow to orange-yellow, fading with age. Pleuro- and cheilocystidia thin-walled, vesiculose-clavate, with yellowish contents. Spore print white. Spores curved cylindrical, amyloid 4?5.5 x 1?2um. Habitat on fallen trunks and branches. Season autumn to early winter. Uncommon. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Panellus mitis (Pers. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Pleurotus mitis (Pers. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Milder Zwergkn?ueling ?desk?s d?csk?gomba Elastic Oysterling. Cap 0.5?1.5cm across, fan-shaped, horizontal, white becoming clay-pink, pellicle separable. Stem 5?10?3?5mm, lateral, flattened, whitish covered in white mealy granules. Flesh white. Taste mild. Gills crowded, with gelatinous edge, white to cream. Spore print white. Spores cylindrical, amyloid, 3.5?5 x 1?1.5um. Habitat coniferous twigs. Season early autumn to early winter. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Oudemansiella mucida (Schrad. ex Fr.) K?hn. syn. Armillaria mucida (Schrad. ex Fr.) Kummer. Porcelain fungus, Poached Egg Fungus, Collybie mucide, Buchen-Schleimr?bling, Gy?r?s f?l?ke, Agarico viscoso, Porseleinzwam. Cap 2?8cm across, convex then flattening, pale greyish when young becoming more white often with an ochraceous flush at the centre, semi-translucent, slimy. Stem 30?100?3?10mm, white striate above the membranous ring, slightly scaly below. Flesh thin, white. Cystidia thin-walled cylindric or utriform. Spore print white. Spores subglobose 13?18?12?15m. Cap cuticle hymeniform, of erect club-shaped cells. Habitat on the trunks of beech, often high up and in large clusters. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Edible after washing to remove gluten. Found In Europe. The last shot is from Ted Green, thanks Ted.
Poisonous/Suspect
Omphalotus olearius (DC. ex Fr.) Sing. syns. Omphallotus illudens (Schw.) Bigelow, Clitocybe olearia (Fr. ex DC.) Maire Jack O'lantern, -lbaumpilz, Vil-g-t- t-lcs-rgomba, Clitocybe de l'olivier, Pleurote de l'olivier. Cap 5-10cm across, strongly depressed to funnel-shaped, bright orange. Stem 40-140 x 7-28mm, wavy and tapering towards the base, paler than cap. Flesh yellowish, darkening towards the stem base. Taste not distinctive, smell strong and unpleasant. Gills decurrent, golden to orange. Spore print white. Spores subglobose, 5-7-4.5-6.5m. Habitat on the roots or at the base of trunks of certain trees; oak and chestnut in Britain, frequently on olive in Europe. Season autumn. Distribution, Europe. Very rare. Poisonous. This fungus may be seen to glow in the dark, the phosphorescence coming from the gills when the spores are mature.
Poisonous/Suspect
Omphalotus illudens (Schw.) Bigelow Jack O'Lantern Vil-g-t- t-lcs-rgomba. Cap 5-20cm across, convex then soon flattened and then funnel-shaped with incurved margin; a brilliant and intense yellow-orange in color; smooth. Gills decurrent, crowded; bright yellow-orange. Stem 50-200 x 10-20mm, tapered at base, solid; colored as cap but darkening at base; smooth. Flesh firm; pale orange. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores globose, 3.5-5 x 3.5-5-. Deposit pale cream. Habitat often in enormous clusters at base of stumps or on buried roots (the latter is very common in gardens and lawns) of oaks and some other deciduous trees. Common. Found throughout much of North America, particularly the eastern United States. Season July-September but sometimes to November. Poisonous but usually not fatal, typically causing gastric upset for some hours or even days. Comment When fresh the gills of this species glow a bright greenish yellow in the dark. Based upon cultural evidence, this may be the same as Omphalotus olearius (DC ex Fr.) Singer of southern Europe, which name would then take precedence. On the West Coast the species Omphalotus olivascens Bigelow, Miller & Thiers is found, which differs in its duller brownish-orange to olivaceous cap and larger spores. It is also poisonous.
Inedible
Neobulgaria pura (Fr.) Petrak Beech Jellydisc B?kk koronggomba. Fruit body 0.5?2cm across, gregarious, subglobose at first with the margin inrolled showing the smooth exterior, becoming flattened on top or concave, flesh-coloured often with a violaceous tint, gelatinous. Asci 70 x 9?. Spores elliptical, containing two small oil drops, 6?9 x 3?4?. Habitat on logs and fallen branches especially beech. Season early summer to early winter. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mycena renati Qu?l. Syn M. flavipes Qu?l. S?rgat?nk? k?gy?gomba. Cap bell-shaped, 1.5-4cm across dull pink, brown or ochre, gills whitish edges may show slight change of colour. Stem golden yellow to yellow-brown. Smell nitrous. Spores 7.5-10 x 4.5-6.5um. Found on rotting deciduous wood and stumps. Rare in Britain, much more common in eastern Europe. These photographs were given by Dr. Barth? Lor?nd from Hungary.
Inedible
Mycena polygramma (Bull. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray Rillstieliger Helmling Bar?zd?ltt?nkű k?gy?gomba Grooved Bonnet. Cap 2–5cm across, conical then expanded and umbonate, dark grey to grey-brown, faintly grooved towards margin. Stem 60–100 x 2–4mm, silvery grey, striate, base rooting. Flesh thin, whitish with pallid line above gills. Taste mild to slightly acrid, smell pleasant. Gills whitish to grey or pinkish. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, with swollen base and drawn-out pointed apex which may fork. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, amyloid, 9–10 x 6–7um. Habitat on twigs or buried wood. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena maculata Karst. syn. M. parabolica (Fr.) Qu?l. s. Bres. Gefleckter Helmling Foltos k?gy?gomba. Cap 1?3cm across, convex expanding to bell-shaped with a distinct umbo, the margin becoming lined and upturned, grey-buff later stained rust. Stem 20?60 x 2?3mm, white at apex, grey-buff below, tinged rust with age, several stems fused together at the white downy base. Flesh very thin, whitish at first becoming tinged rust. Taste not distinctive, smell strongly mushroomy. Gills pale grey then tinged rust. Cheilocystidia pyriform, apex covered with relatively long filiform irregular processes. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 7?11 x 4?5um. Habitat in small clusters on stumps or logs of beech. Season autumn. Rare. Said to be edible -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena inclinata (Fr.) Qu?l. Buntstieliger Helmling Cifra k?gy?gomba Myc?ne inclin? Clustered Bonnet. Cap 2?3cm across, conical expanding to bell-shaped with prominent umbo, bay, darker and lined towards centre, lighter in colour when dry, margin slightly overhanging the gills giving a delicately scalloped appearance. Stem 50?100 x 2?4mm, whitish at apex deepening to dark red-brown towards the base which is covered in fine white down. Flesh thin, whitish. Taste mild, smell mealy or rancid. Gills adnate, whitish becoming flesh-pink. Cheilocystidia clavate, the apex covered with relatively long filiform irregular processes. Spore print white. Spores ovoid, amyloid, 8?9 x 6?7um. Habitat in dense tufts on oak stumps. Season late summer to autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena haematopus (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. M. cruenta (Fr.) Qu?l. Rotstieliger Helmling V?rz? k?gy?gomba Myc?ne ? pied rouge Burgundydrop Bonnet. Cap 2?4cm across, conical to bell-shaped, grey-brown with clay-pink tint, striate at margin when moist, drying light pink. Stem 40?100 x 2?3mm, grey-pink exuding a deep blood-red latex when broken, often fused together to form tufts. Flesh blood-red. Taste slightly bitter, smell not distinctive. Gills adnate, white becoming pale pink, often with darker edge. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia thin-walled with swollen base and an abrupt pointed apex. Spore print white. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid 7?10 x 5?6um. Habitat on old stumps. Season autumn. Occasional. Said to be edible -avoid. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena galericulata (Scop. ex Fr.) S.F. Gray syn. M. rugosa (Fr.) Qu-l. Bonnet Mycena, Myc-ne - bonnet, Myc-ne casqu-, Rosabl-ttriger Helmling, R-zs-slemez- k-gy-gomba, Helmmycena. Cap 2-6cm across, conical expanding to bell-shaped with broad umbo, brown or grey-brown with paler margin which is distinctly lined. Stem 20-100 x 3-8mm, concolorous with cap, paler near apex, hollow but tough, base covered in fine white fibrils and often rooting. Flesh thin, white. Taste mild, smell mealy when crushed, rancid. Gills adnate with decurrent tooth, white at first becoming flesh-pink. Cheilocystidia clavate covered with relatively long filiform processes. Spore print cream. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 9-12 x 6-8um. Basidia often two-spored. Habitat in clusters on stumps and fallen branches of broad-leaved trees. Season all year. Common. Edible - not worthwhile -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Mycena arcangeliana Bresadola Syn. Mycena oortiana Hora syn. M. arcangeliana var. oortiana K-hn. Graubrauner Helmling Olajs-rg-s k-gy-gomba. Cap 1-4cm across, broadly conical, whitish to grey-brown with an olivaceous tint, striate. Stem 20-40 x 1-2mm, greyish, the colour fading with age, base covered in white down. Flesh white in cap, grey in stem. Taste mild, smell strongly iodoform. Gills crowded, adnexed, white at first later pinkish. Cheilocystidia abundant, thin-walled, clavate or ovate, hyaline, densely granulate-warted. Spore print whitish. Spores pip-shaped, amyloid 7-8 x 4.5-5um. Habitat on stumps and branches of deciduous trees. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edibility unknown -avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Mycena acicula (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Marasmiellus aciculus (Schaeff. ex Fr.) Sing. Orangeroter Helmling Narancsv-r-s k-gy-gomba Orange Bonnet. Cap 2-10mm, hemispherical, bright orange becoming paler towards the margin, striate. Stem 20-50-1mm, bright yellow becoming paler towards the rooting, slightly hairy base. Flesh very thin, orange in cap. Taste mild, smell none. Gills ascending, pale yellow with whitish edge. Cheilo- and pleurocystidia not very prominent, thin-walled, hyaline, fusoid. Spore print white. Spores fusiform, nonamyloid, 9-12 x 3-4um. Habitat on dead twigs and other woody fragments. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe and north America.
Inedible
Megacollybia platyphylla (pers.) Kotl.& Pouz wellknown as Tricholomopsis platyphylla (Pers. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Oudemansiella platyphylla (Pers. ex Fr.) Moser syn. Collybia platyphylla (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer Breitbl?ttriger Holzritterling Sz?leslemez? f?l?ke Collybie ? feuillets ?pais, Collybie ? chapeau ray?. Cap 4?10cm across, hemispherical soon expanded with depressed centre, dark grey-brown with an ochraceous tint, somewhat streaky surface sometimes disrupting in minute scurfy scales towards the margin. Stem 30?50 x 10?13mm, tough, whitish fibrillosely striate often flushed with cap colour, passing into long rooting mycelial strands. Flesh white. Taste bitter, smell not distinctive. Gills very broad, whitish cream. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, swollen pear-shaped, 50?60 x 15?25um. Spore print white. Spores subglobose 6?8 x 6?7um. Habitat attached to deciduous stumps or pieces of buried wood by the tough white mycelial strands. Season summer to autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Marasmius scorodonius (Fr.) Fr. Barnat?nk? fokhagymagomba. Cap 1-3cm across; broadly convex expanding to nearly flat, with an inturned margin that becomes wavy; reddish or yellowish brown becoming faded; dry, smooth, radially wrinkled. Gills adnate or nearly free, crowded, narrow, often forked; yellowish pink to pallid. Stem 15-60 x 1-3mm, round to compressed; yellowish white toward the top, dark brown below; dry, smooth, shining, brittle. Odor of onions or garlic. Taste of onions or garlic. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, 7-10 x 3-5?. Deposit white. Habitat scattered or in groups on debris, bark, twigs, grass, needle duff. Frequent. Found in northern North America and California. Season July October (over-winters in California). Edible
Inedible
Marasmius rotula (Scop. ex Fr.) Fr. Fallschirm-Schwindling Nyak?rves szegf?gomba Marasme petite roue Collared Parachute. Cap 0.5?1.5cm across, convex, centrally flattened and ribbed like a parachute with the margin scalloped, whitish, sometimes dark brown in the depressed centre. Stem 20?70 x 1mm, white at apex dark brown below. Flesh white in cap, brown in stem. Gills whitish cream, attached to a collar free of the stem. Spore print white. Spores elongate elliptical, 7?10 x 3.5?5um. Cuticular cells subglobose with tiny dense finger-like processes. Habitat gregarious on dead twigs and roots, less frequently on leaves. Season summer to winter. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
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