North america Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
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Total mushrooms fount: 1241

Edible
Tricholoma columbetta (Fr.) Kummer. Tricolome columbette, Columbette, Weisseidiger Ritterling, Galambpereszke, Colombetta, Witte duifridderzwam, Blue Spot Knight. Cap 5?10cm across, convex then expanding, silky white sometimes with greenish, pinkish or violet-blue spots when old. Stem 40?100 x 10?20mm, rooting, white sometimes blue-green at base. Flesh white, firm. Taste none, smell not distinctive. Gills white, crowded. Spore print white. Spores oval, 5.5?7 x 3.5?5um. Habitat deciduous and coniferous woods. Season late summer to early autumn. Occasional. Edible ? good but somewhat fibrous. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Tricholoma atrosquamosum (Chev.) Sacc. syn. T. terreum var. atrosquamosum (Chev.) Schwarzschuppiger Ritterling, Feketepikkelyes (pikkelyest?nk?) pereszke, Massee, Zwartschubbige ridderzwam, Dark Scaled Knight. Cap 4?12cm across, flattened convex with a slight umbo, grey or pale clay densely covered in blackish-grey pointed scales. Stem 30?80 x 10?20mm, paler than the cap, greyish with blackish scales. Flesh greyish. Taste slightly mealy, smell aromatic or peppery. Gills white to grey with black dotted edge. Spore print white. Spores 4.5?9 x 3?6um. Habitat in coniferous and deciduous woods. Season autumn. Rare. Edible -caution. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Tricholoma albobrunneum (Pers. ex Fr.) Kummer. Tricolome brun et blanc, Weissbrauner Ritterling, Keserny?s pereszke, Agarico bianco e bruno, Witbruine ridderzwam. Cap 5?8cm across, conico-convex, reddish-brown and covered in fine innate radiating fibrils, greasy or viscid. Stem 60?80 x 10?15mm, whitish above the distinctive ring zone but reddish brown below remaining slightly scaly in the upper portion. Flesh white tinged brownish below the cap cuticle and towards the stem base. Smell faintly mealy. Gills white, reddish-brown with age. Spore print white. Spores broadly elliptical, 5 x 3?4um. Habitat with conifers. Season autumn. Rare. Edible ? poor and indigestible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Tricholoma acerbum (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Tricolome acerbe, Gerippter Ritterling, Keser? pereszke, Agarico acerbo, Krulzoomridderzwam, Bitter Knight. Cap 7?12cm across, convex, margin strongly incurved, and usually ribbed, yellowish-buff to tan. Stem 30?70 x 20?30mm, bulbous and often pointed at base, apex covered in densely crowded minute yellowish granular scales, becoming yellowish-buff below. Flesh thick, white. Taste peppery and bitter, but sometimes mild, smell fruity. Gills crowded, whitish to yellowish at first becoming spotted reddish-brown. Spore print white. Spores subglobose to ovate. 4?6 x 3?4um. Habitat mixed woodland. Season autumn. Rare. Slightly poisonous although eaten in some places after parboiling; of poor quality. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Trichoglossum hirsutum (Pers. ex Fr.) Boud. Hairy Earthtongue. Fruit body 2?8cm high, 0.3?0.8cm wide, black, fertile head varying from flattened-cylindric to more club-shaped tapering into the slender compressed, velvety stalk. Asci 220 x 20?. Setae projecting between the asci numerous, thick-walled, black, stiff and pointed. Spores brown, subcylindric, 100?150 x 6?7?, fifteen-septate at maturity. Habitat in grassland or amongst sphagnum on acid solid. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Trichoglossum hirsutum var. capitatum Trichoglossum hirsutum var. capitatum (Pers. ex Fr.) Boud. Differing from T. hirsutum only in the distinctly spade-shaped fertile head, identical in all other respects. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Trichaptum biforme (Fr. in Klotzch) Ryv. Bracket 1-8cm across, semicircular, fan-shaped, flat; color variable in concentric zones, ochre to dark brown, white to grayish, brownish or black, violet margins; hairy becoming smooth. Tubes 1-l0mm deep. Pores 2-5 per mm, angular, becoming tooth-like; white to brownish with mauve tinge and mauve along the margin. No stem. Flesh 0.5-1.5cm thick; white to yellow. Spores cylindrical, smooth, 5-6.5 x 2-2.5?. Deposit white. Habitat numerous, single, or overlapping caps on dead stumps of trees of deciduous wood, reducing them to sawdust. Very common. Found widely distributed throughout North America. Season May-December, but often persisting all year. Not edible.
Inedible
Tremella mesenterica Retz. ex Hook, syn Tremella lutescens Fr. Yellow Brain Fungus, Tr?melle m?sent?rique, Goldgelber Zitterling, Aranyos rezg?gomba, Tremella arancione, Gele trilzwam. Fruit body 2?10cm across, comprising soft, flabby, gelatinous lobes and folds, golden-yellow to orange, drying dark orange, horny, and brittle. Spores white, broadly ovate to subglobose, 7?10 x 6?10?. Basidia resembling hot cross buns when seen from above. Habitat on dead deciduous branches, sometimes still attached to the tree. Season all year, especially late autumn. Frequent. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Note some specimens found in America were white, this needs further investigation.
Inedible
Tremella foliacea Fries Fodros rezg?gomba. Known as Brown Witches? Butter. The fungus is an irregular gelatinous arrangement of lobes and cups fused at the base 5-15 cm wide. The colour is brown to reddish-ochre, lighter when fresh and young. Spores dull cream-yellowish, 8-11 x 6-9um nearly spherical. Smell and taste slight. Growing on hardwood twigs and logs in autumn right up to winter; Found in both Europe and North America . Said to be edible but I advise not eating it. The pictures were sent to me by Lorand Barth? in Hungary the second one was taken by Edit Szilv?sy to both of them I am most grateful.
Inedible
Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) Fr. Earthfan, T?l?phore terrestre, Erdledepilz, Talajlak? szem?lcsgomba (szem?lcs?sgomba), Franjezwam. Fruit body 3?6cm across, fan-shaped, vertical to horizontal, forming large clustered groups, reddish- to chocolate-brown, darkening to almost black with age, covered in radiating fibres, becoming paler and fringed at the margin. Lower or fertile surface clay-brown to pallid, irregularly wrinkled. Spores purple-brown, angular and warted, 8?9 x 6?7?. Habitat in conifer woods or heaths, usually on sandy soil. Season late summer to early winter. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Thelephora palmata (Scop.) Fr. Stinkende Lederkoralle B?d?s szem?lcs?sgomba (szem?lcsgomba), b?d?s b?r-korallgomba. Fruit body 2?5cm high, 1?3cm across, comprising several erect, flattened, palmate purple-brown branches arising from a common stem 10?15 x 2?5mm. Flesh leathery. Smell fetid or strongly of garlic. Spores reddish-brown, angular and spiny, 8?11 x 7?8?. Habitat on the ground near conifers. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Easily recognized by the strong smell. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Suillus variegatus (Fr.) O. Kuntze syn. Boletus variegatus Fr. Sandr-hrling, Semmelpilz, Tarka feny-tin-ru (-tin-ru), Bolet mouchet-, C-pe tachet- ou verget-, Velvet Bolete. Cap 6-13cm, rusty tawny or ochraceous to olivaceous, speckled with darker, small, flattened scales, initially slightly downy becoming slightly greasy with age, tacky in wet weather. Stem 50-90 x 15-20mm, ochre, more yellow towards apex, flushed rust-colour below. Flesh pale lemon in cap, more deeply coloured in stem base, sometimes tinged with blue throughout or above the tubes. Taste slight, smell strongly fungusy. Tubes dark buff. Pores subangular and compound, ochre with olivaceous tint at first becoming more cinnamon. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusoid-elongate to ellipsoid, 9-11 x 3-4um. Habitat with conifers. Season late summer. Occasional. Edible. Found In Europe and north America.
Edible
Suillus luteus (Fr.) S. F. Gray syn. Boletus luteus Fr. Slippery Jack, Bolet Jaune, Nonnette voil-e, Bolet annulaire, Butterpilz, Barna gy-r-stin-ru (-tin-ru), Boleto giallo, Bruine Ringboleet. Cap 5-10cm, chestnut to sepia covered in brown gluten, becoming more rust-coloured with age, shiny on drying. Stem 50-100 x 20-30mm, pale straw-coloured at apex rapidly discoloured with darkening glandular dots, with a large white to cream ring which darkens to sepia, white below becoming vinaceous brown with age. Flesh white, often vinaceous at base of stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Tubes lemon-yellow to straw-colour. Pores round, similarly coloured, becoming flushed sienna. Spore print clay to ochraceous. Spores subfusiform to elongate ellipsoid, 7-10 x 3-3.5um. Habitat with conifers, usually Scots pine. Season autumn. Common. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Suillus granulatus (Fr.) O. Kuntze. syn. Boletus granulatus Fr. K-rnchenr-hrling, Feny-tin-ru, szemcs-st-nk- feny--tin-ru, Bolet granul-, Nonnette pleureuse Weeping Bolete. Cap 3-9cm, rusty brown to yellowish, viscid, shiny when dry. Stem 35-80 x 7-10mm, lemon-yellow flushed vinaceous to coral towards the base, the upper region covered in white or pale yellow granules which exude pale milky droplets. Flesh lemon-yellow, lemon-chrome in stem, paler in cap. Taste and smell slight but pleasant. Tubes buff to pale yellow, unchanging. Pores small, similarly coloured, exuding pale milky droplets. Spore print ochraceous sienna. Spores subfusiform-ellipsoid, 8-10 x 2.5-3.5um. Habitat with conifers. Season late autumn. Common. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Suillus flavidus (Fr.) Sing. syn. Boletus flavidus Fr. Moor-R-hrling L-pi feny-tin-ru (-tin-ru). Cap 2-6cm across, umbonate, straw-yellow to pale ochre, viscid. Stem 50-75x 5-8mm, straw-yellow above the gelatinous, tawny ring, dull yellow to buff below. Flesh pale yellow becoming vinaceous when cut. Taste and smell not distinctive. Tubes decurrent, deep yellow. Pores large, angular, concolorous with tubes. Spore print ochraceous snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform-elliptic, 8-10 x 3.5-4.5um. Habitat wet mossy areas, usually with Scots pine and often in sphagnum. Season late summer. Rare and more or less confined to the Scottish Highlands. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Stropharia squamosa (Fr.) Qu?l. Pikkelyes harmatgomba. Cap 3-5cm across, convex-campanulate; dull yellow-ochre to tawny, with paler, faint scales at margin; viscid. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120 x 3-l0mm, long, rigid; brownish; scaly below the small ring. Flesh thin; whitish. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores ellipsoid, with pore at tip, 12-14 x 6-7.5?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on decayed wood chips in mixed woodlands. Found in Europe and throughout northern North America. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Stropharia semiglobata (Batsch. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Dung Roundhead, Strophaire semi-globuleux, Halbkugeliger Tr?uschling, Dombor? harmatgomba, f?lg?mbalak? harmatgomba, Kleefsteel-stropharia. Cap 1?3cm across, hemispherical, light yellow, viscid. Stem 60?100 x 2?3mm, yellowish, apex paler, viscid below the ring; ring incomplete, often represented by zone of blackish fibrils. Flesh thin, pallid. Gills purplish-brown becoming black-spotted. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores elliptic, 15?17 x 9?10um. Habitat on dung. Season spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Stropharia rugosoannulata Farlow ex Murr. King Stropharia, Wine Cup, -ri-s harmatgomba. Cap 5-20cm across, convex-flattened to umbonate; deep purplish red to dull brown or even grayish or white with age; smooth, not viscid. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then gray and finally purple-brown. Stem 100-180x 10-25mm, equal to clavate; white; smooth; ring large, prominent, deeply wrinkled or segmented below, very thick, white. Flesh firm; white. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-13 x 7.5-9-. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on wood chips and bark mulch and around flower beds. Very common. Found Europe and widely distributed in northern North America. Season June-October. Edible-delicious. Comment An almost pure white form is not infrequent; also a closely related (probably undescribed) yellow species with viscid cap may be found at the same time.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia hornemannii (Fr.) Lundell Fenyves harmatgomba. Cap 6-15cm across, broadly convex umbonate; dull reddish brown or purple-brown, with white veil remnants at margin; very viscid when wet. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120x 10-20mm; white; strongly fibrillose-scaly below the prominent ring. Flesh white. Odor a little unpleasant. Taste a little unpleasant. Spores ellipsoid, with germ pore, 10-14 x 5.5-7?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on rotting conifer logs. Found in Europe and northern North America. Season August-November. Not edible- possibly poisonous.
Inedible
Stropharia coronilla (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu?l. syn. S. obturata (Fr.) Qu?l. Stropharia coronilla Kr?nchen-Tr?uschling S?rga harmatgomba Strophaire coronille Garland Roundhead. Cap 2?4cm across, convex then flattened, light yellow, slightly viscid or greasy. Stem 25?40 x 6?8mm, white tapering towards base; ring white, but often accentuated by trapped deposit of dark spores. Flesh thick, white. Gills white then clay-brown. Pleurocystidia broadly lanceolate with acutely pointed apex, staining deeply in aniline blue in lactic acid. Spore print purple-brown. Spores elliptic with indistinct pore, 7?9 x 4?6um. Habitat lawns and pasture. Season autumn. Common. Edible ? not worthwhile. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Stropharia aeruginosa (Curt. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Verdigris Agaric, Strophaire vert-de-gris, Vert-de-gris, Gr?nspantr?uschling, Z?ld harmatgomba, Strofaria grigio-verde, Kopergroenezwam. Cap 2?8cm across, convex to bell-shaped then flattened and slightly umbonate, blue to blue-green from the gluten and flecked with white scales, becoming pale yellowish as this is lost. Stem 40?100 x 4?12mm, whitish to blue, apex smooth, covered in small whitish scales below the spreading membranous ring. Flesh whitish-blue. Smell none. Gills white then clay brown, often with a white edge. Cheilocystidia obtuse, clavate-capitate or lageniform capitate; lanceolate chrysocystidia found on gill face and only rarely on gill-edge. Spore print brownish-purple. Spores elliptic, 7?10 x 5um. Habitat woods, heaths and pastures. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
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