Less than 5cm Mushrooms identifications

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Total mushrooms fount: 587

Inedible
Mycena leaiana (Berk.) Sacc. Cap 1-5cm across, bell-shaped becoming convex, with center sometimes depressed; bright reddish orange becoming more yellow in age; slimy, shiny, smooth. Gills adnate, close to crowded, broad; dirty yellow-pink, staining orange-yellow when cut, with bright red-orange edges. Stem 30-70 x 1-3mm, tough, fibrous; orange to yellow, paler near apex, exuding a little watery, orange juice; slimy and somewhat sticky with base covered in dense, coarse hairs. Flesh thickish, pliant; white beneath the orange cuticle. Odor faintly mealy. Taste slight. Spores ellipsoid, amyloid, 7-10 x 5-6-. Deposit white. Habitat in dense clusters on deciduous wood. Common. Throughout central and eastern states of North America. Season f one-September. Edibility not known- avoid. ----------- This month's fungi, Mycena leaiana, is a great mushroom to find in the woods. It's shiny orange, with glowing orange marginate gills (more on that later), and therefore often sticks out from an extended distance. Despite the fact that the mushrooms themselves are very small at maturity, usually significantly less than an inch (3 cm) in diameter, they could be very prolific fruiters, so there is a huge amount of it to be seen often. Even in dry weather you could find it since it uses this found very deep in the log to create its fruiting bodies. Understand that mushrooms are 90-95% normal water, so if there is no drinking water there are no mushrooms, but Mycena leaiana appears to be an excellent scavenger of drinking water through its mycelium from solid wood. The edibility of the fungus is unidentified, but is as yet not known to be poisonous. That said, there appears to be nothing at all to recommend it for the stand anyway, since it is rather small and has a fairly rubbery surface if you make an effort to cut it. The orange color comes off on the hands when you touch it, and it might be dreamed by me would do the same in the mouth area. So how about these marginate gills? If you look on the lower of the mushroom, you can view that the gills are orange. This seems just like a contradiction, because the spore printing is white. In the event that you look just a little deeper however, e.g. with a side lens, you can view that the orange color is mainly limited to the advantage of the gills. A straight closer look with a microscope reveals that the orange pigment is mainly limited to cystidia, sterile cells at the edge of the gill. Cystidia on the border of the gill are medically called "cheilocystidia" (practically, "lip cystidia"). Compare these to the "pleurocystidia" ("part cystidia") entirely on (you guessed it) the attributes of the gills of Pluteus cervinus. Mycena leaiana microscopic mix portion of the gills The cystidia are shiny orangeBelow and the left you can view what these cystidia appear to be microscopically. Observe that the strikingly beautiful orange cystidia include almost all of the advantage of the gill, offering this varieties its quality orange margin. However if you look from the gill advantage toward the basidia (basidiospore producing set ups), you will get some wayward orange cystidia borne singly on the list of basidia often.
Inedible
Xylaria longipes Nitschke. Langstielige Holzkeule, Nyeles agancsgomba, Dead Moll's Fingers. Similar to X. polymorpha but altogether more slender. Spores smaller, 12?16 x 5?7um. Habitat on stumps and fallen branches usually of sycamore. Season all year. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Xylaria carpophila (Pers.) Fr. Kleine Holzkeule. Similar to X. hypoxylon but generally much more slender. Habitat on old, rotting beech masts. Season all year. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Verpa bohemica (Krombh.) Schroer. B-hmische Verpel, Cseh kucsmagomba, Rapunzelverpel. Cap 1-2.5cm high, thimble- to bell-shaped; dull yellow-brown to sepia; surface deeply wrinkled and convoluted; margin completely free from the stem, cap attached only at top. Stem 50-100 x 10-25mm, slightly clavate; white; smooth to scurfy-granular, often ridged. Flesh white. Odor pleasant. Taste pleasant. Asci each ascus holds only 2 spores. Spores huge, ellipsoid, smooth, 60-80 x 15-18-. Deposit yellow. Habitat in damp woods along stream banks, pathsides. Found in Europe and throughout most of North America although rare in the East. Season March-early May. Edible with caution. Although widely eaten, it has caused adverse symptoms in some people.
Edible
Vascellum pratense (Pers.) Kreisel syn. V. depressum (Bon.) Smarda syn. Lycoperdon depressum Bon. syn. Lycoperdon hiemale Vitt. M?nzenst?ubling, Sz?lessz?j? laposp?feteg (p?feteg), Lycoperdon des pr?s, Meadow Puffball. Fruit body 2?4cm across, subglobose narrowed into a short squat stem, white at first then yellowish flesh-coloured, finally light brown, outer layer scurfy and with some small white spines, inner wall smooth and shining opening by a small pore but eventually the upper part breaking away totally leaving the fruit body bowl-shaped. Gleba olive-brown; sterile base well-developed, separated from the spore mass by a distinct membrane. Spores olive-brown, globose, finely warted, 3?5.5m in diameter. Habitat on lawns, golf-courses or pasture. Season summer to late autumn. Common. Edible when young. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Ustulina deusta (Fr.) Petrak syn. Kretzschmaria deusta (Hoffm.:Fr.) P. Martin. Korsthoutskoolzwam Szenes ripacsosgomba. Fruit body forming irregular wavy cushions or encrusting the substrate, greyish white in the early stages soon becoming brittle enough to crush between the fingers, finally black and very brittle resembling charred wood. Asci 300 x 15m. Spores black, fusiform, 28?34 x 7?10um. Habitat on old dead stumps or roots of deciduous trees especially beech. Season late spring to summer, although the blackened state may be seen all year round. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Edible
Tricholoma squarrulosum Bres. syn. T. atrosquamosum var. squarrulosum (Bres.) Pearson & Dennis. Schuppenritterling, Pikkelyest?nk? pereszke, Spikkelsteelridder. Cap 4?5cm across, flattened convex, grey-brown, darker towards the centre, covered in blackish-brown scales. Stem 40?50 x 5?8mm, greyish covered in fine blackish-brown scales. Flesh whitish to grey. Smell mealy. Gills whitish grey often slightly flesh-coloured. Spore print white. Spores pip-shaped, 7?8 x 4?5um. Habitat conifer woods. Season autumn. Rare. Edible with caution. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Tricholoma lascivum (Fr.) Gillet. Unversch?mter Ritterling, ?mely?t? (szem?rmetlen) pereszke, Vuilwitte ridderzwam, Aromatic Knight. Cap 4?7cm across, convex then flattened and finally slightly depressed, dirty whitish to pallid tan, silky smooth. Stem 75?110 x 10?15mm, white discolouring pale brownish. Flesh white. Taste sweet and mealy, smell pleasant, sweet-scented. Gills crowded, whitish then cream. Spore print white. Spores elliptic, 6?7 x 3.5?4m. Habitat deciduous woods. Season autumn. Uncommon. Suspect ? avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Trichoglossum hirsutum (Pers. ex Fr.) Boud. Hairy Earthtongue. Fruit body 2?8cm high, 0.3?0.8cm wide, black, fertile head varying from flattened-cylindric to more club-shaped tapering into the slender compressed, velvety stalk. Asci 220 x 20?. Setae projecting between the asci numerous, thick-walled, black, stiff and pointed. Spores brown, subcylindric, 100?150 x 6?7?, fifteen-septate at maturity. Habitat in grassland or amongst sphagnum on acid solid. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Trichoglossum hirsutum var. capitatum Trichoglossum hirsutum var. capitatum (Pers. ex Fr.) Boud. Differing from T. hirsutum only in the distinctly spade-shaped fertile head, identical in all other respects. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Thelephora palmata (Scop.) Fr. Stinkende Lederkoralle B?d?s szem?lcs?sgomba (szem?lcsgomba), b?d?s b?r-korallgomba. Fruit body 2?5cm high, 1?3cm across, comprising several erect, flattened, palmate purple-brown branches arising from a common stem 10?15 x 2?5mm. Flesh leathery. Smell fetid or strongly of garlic. Spores reddish-brown, angular and spiny, 8?11 x 7?8?. Habitat on the ground near conifers. Season late summer to late autumn. Rare. Easily recognized by the strong smell. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Stropharia squamosa (Fr.) Qu?l. Pikkelyes harmatgomba. Cap 3-5cm across, convex-campanulate; dull yellow-ochre to tawny, with paler, faint scales at margin; viscid. Gills adnate, crowded; pallid then purple-brown. Stem 60-120 x 3-l0mm, long, rigid; brownish; scaly below the small ring. Flesh thin; whitish. Odor not distinctive. Taste not distinctive. Spores ellipsoid, with pore at tip, 12-14 x 6-7.5?. Deposit purple-brown. Habitat on decayed wood chips in mixed woodlands. Found in Europe and throughout northern North America. Season August-October. Not edible.
Inedible
Stropharia semiglobata (Batsch. ex Fr.) Qu?l. Dung Roundhead, Strophaire semi-globuleux, Halbkugeliger Tr?uschling, Dombor? harmatgomba, f?lg?mbalak? harmatgomba, Kleefsteel-stropharia. Cap 1?3cm across, hemispherical, light yellow, viscid. Stem 60?100 x 2?3mm, yellowish, apex paler, viscid below the ring; ring incomplete, often represented by zone of blackish fibrils. Flesh thin, pallid. Gills purplish-brown becoming black-spotted. Spore print dark purplish-brown. Spores elliptic, 15?17 x 9?10um. Habitat on dung. Season spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Stropharia coronilla (Bull. ex Fr.) Qu?l. syn. S. obturata (Fr.) Qu?l. Stropharia coronilla Kr?nchen-Tr?uschling S?rga harmatgomba Strophaire coronille Garland Roundhead. Cap 2?4cm across, convex then flattened, light yellow, slightly viscid or greasy. Stem 25?40 x 6?8mm, white tapering towards base; ring white, but often accentuated by trapped deposit of dark spores. Flesh thick, white. Gills white then clay-brown. Pleurocystidia broadly lanceolate with acutely pointed apex, staining deeply in aniline blue in lactic acid. Spore print purple-brown. Spores elliptic with indistinct pore, 7?9 x 4?6um. Habitat lawns and pasture. Season autumn. Common. Edible ? not worthwhile. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Stereum gausapatum (Fr.) Fr. syn. Stereum spadiceum (Fr.) Fr. Brauner Schichtpilz Nemezes r?teggomba Bleeding Oak Crust. Fruit body resupinate or forming small tiered brackets 1?4cm across, tough and leathery, thin-fleshed; upper surface zoned ochre-brown to greyish, finely hairy, margin white. Fertile or lower surface pallid to dark chestnut, smooth, bleeding red if cut when fresh. Spores white, oblong, amyloid, 7?8 x 3?3.5um. Habitat on stumps, logs and fallen branches of deciduous trees, especially oak. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Sphaerobolus stellatus Tode syn. S. carpobolus (L.) Schroet. syn. Carpobolus stellatus (Mich.) Desm. Kugelwerfer Shooting Star. Fruit body 1.5?2.5mm across, initially globose and whitish becoming more ochraceous and splitting above into 5?9 minute orange-coloured rays, exposing the peridiole as a brownish ball containing the spores. This is projected over a range of up to 5.5 metres (14 feet) to disperse the spores by the sudden reversal of the receptacle which then appears as a translucent white sphere sitting on the star-shaped outer wall. Spores oblong, 7.5?10 x 3.5?5um. Habitat on sticks, sawdust, dung and other organic debris. Season autumn. Occasional but possibly often overlooked. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Scutellinia scutellata (L. ex St. Amans) Lamb. Common Eyelash S?rt?s cs?szegomba. Cup 0.2?1cm across, shallowly disc-shaped, inner surface bright orange-red, outer pale brown covered in stiff dark brown or black hairs up to 1,000? long and 40? wide towards the forked, rooting bases, narrowing towards the pointed apices, septate; visible without a lens as distinct ?eyelashed? rimming the margin. Asci 300 x 25?. Spores elliptical and with a roughened exterior, containing several small oil droplets, 18?19 x 10?12?. Habitat on damp soil or rotten wood. Season late spring to late autumn. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Scleroderma verrucosum (Bull.) Pers. Braunwarziger Kartoffelbovist, Nyeles ?ltrifla, Scl?roderme verruqueux, Scaly Earthball. Fruit body 2.5?5cm across, subglobose often flattened on top, tapering into a long, thick stem-like base which is usually prominently ribbed, yellowish to brown covered in small brownish scales, the thin leathery wall breaking open irregularly above when mature. Gleba olive-brown. Spores dark brown, globose covered in spines or warts, 10?14um in diameter. Habitat on sandy soil in woods or heaths. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Scleroderma areolatum Ehr. syn. S. lycoperdoides Schwein. Netzbovist Pikkelyes (leop-rd) -ltrifla Leopard Earthball. Fruit body 1-3(4)cm across, subglobose, tapering into a thick rooting stalk which passes into a few strong mycelial strands, yellowish-brown covered in smooth very dark scales surrounded by a ring giving a dotted, reticulate pattern when the scales have been worn off, opening by an irregular slit or pore. Gleba deep purplish-brown. Spores dark brown, globose, 9-14m in diameter, covered in spines 1.5m long. Habitat damp places on bare ground or amongst sparse grass or moss. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Schizophyllum commune Fr. Split-gill or Common Porecrust, Schizophylle commun, Gemeiner Spaltbl?ttling, Hasadtlemez? gomba, k?z?ns?ges hasadtlemez? gomba, Waaiertje. Cap 1?4cm across, fan-shaped, often lobed or fused with others, sessile or on a short stem-like base, densely covered in greyish-white down with a purplish tinge. Gills radiating from the point of attachment, splitting lengthwise and rolling back covering the space between the gills, and protecting the hymenium from desiccation. Spore print white. Spores cylindric, 6 x 3um. Habitat on dead wood of deciduous trees and also on cut timber. Season all year. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Sarcoscypha coccinea (Fr.) Lamb syn. Peziza coccinea Fr. Scharlachroter Kelchbecherling Piros cs?szegomba. Cup 1?5cm across, cup-shaped, the margin becoming tattered as it expands, attached to substrate by a short stalk, inner surface bright scarlet, outer whitish and covered in white matted tufted hairs. Asci 400 x 16?, not blued by iodine. Spores cylindric-ellipsoid containing several small oil droplets, 24?32 x 12?14?. Habitat gregarious, on dead wood. Season early winter to early spring. Frequent especially in the West. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
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