Light to dark brown Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
Cap type:
Fungus colour:
Normal size:
Location:
Flesh:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Text:

Total mushrooms fount: 276

Inedible
Pholiota lenta (Fr.) Singer Fak? t?kegomba. Cap 3-8cm across, convex-hemispherical, becoming more expanded in age; whitish to pinkish buff or smoky gray, with a slightly darker disc; sticky to slimy, with scattered white hairy scales of veil remnants. Gills adnate or with a decurrent tooth, close, narrow to medium-broad, edges even to fringed; white becoming grayish brown. Stem 30-100 x 4-12mm, solid or spongy, sub-bulbous; white above, brownish below; finely hairy. Veil copious, cortinate; white; leaves an evanescent ring. Flesh firm; white. Odor slight, radishy. Taste mild. Spores ellipsoid to oblong, smooth, tiny pore at apex, 5.5-7 x 3.5-4.5?. Deposit cigar brown. Pleurocystidia abundant. Habitat on humus debris in mixed woods. Found in Europe and eastern North America and California. Season July-December. Not edible.
Inedible
Pholiota highlandensis (Pk.) Smith & Hesler Cap 2-5cm across, broadly convex becoming flatter and somewhat depressed, sometimes with a low umbo; yellowy orange to cinnamon reddish brown with a paler margin, fading to ochraceous-buff colors; smooth except for veil remnants on the margin, hygrophanous. Gills adnate, close, broad, edges even or eroded; pallid or pale yellowish becoming cinnamon brown. Stem 20-40 x 3-6mm; top portion whitish to yellowish becoming dingy brown, lower portion pallid then brownish (darker than the top), with patches of pale yellow or buff veil remnants. Flesh thin; yellow. Odor not distinctive. Taste slightly disagreeable or none. Spores ellipsoid to oval, smooth, distinct pore at apex, 6-8 x 4-4.5?. Deposit cinnamon brown. Habitat on burned-over soil or charred wood. Found in many parts of North America, though apparently not in the Northeast. Season April-November. Not edible.
Inedible
Pholiota flavida (Fr.) Singer Cap 3-7cm across, convex expanding to almost flat, with an incurved margin with some faint veil remnants; yellow to dingy, watery yellow-ochre or tawny; thinly sticky and smooth. Gills adnate to adnexed, close, narrow to moderately broad, edges even; pallid, becoming pale rusty brown in age. Stem 50-110 x 5-15mm, solid, slightly tapering to the base; pallid above fine hairy zone of evanescent yellowish veil, dark rust-brown from base upward; grooved and finely hairy in lower part. Flesh thick, firm, yellowish. Odor faintly fragrant. Taste mild. Spores oval to subellipsoid, smooth, distinct pore at apex, 7-9 x 4-5-. Deposit cigar brown. No pleurocystidia; cheilocystidia versiform and caulocystidia similar. Habitat in large clusters on logs and stumps and at the base of coniferous and hardwood trees. Found in Europe Maine and the Pacific Northwest of America. Season August-November. Not edible.
Inedible
Phellinus pini (Fr.) Ames. Feny-tapl- Pine Conk. Bracket 2-20cm across, 1-15cm thick; hoof-shaped, fan-shaped, or shelf-like; tawny to dark reddish brown or brownish black in age, with the margin often brighter; hard, crusty, rough or cracked, minutely hairy, generally curved. Tubes up to 6mm deep. Pores circular to angular; dingy yellow-tawny. Stem minute or none. Flesh tough; tawny to tan or ochre. Spores globose or subglobose, smooth, 4-6 x 3.5-5-. Deposit brown. Habitat singly or in rows on living or recently dead coniferous trunks. Common. Widely distributed in North America. Season perennial. Not edible. Comment A very destructive fungus that attacks the heartwood of living trees, resulting in "conk rot" causing more timber loss than any other fungus.
Inedible
Phallus impudicus Pers. syn. Ithyphallus impudicus (L.) Fr. Stinkhorn, Phallus Impudique, Satyre puant, Oeuf du diable, Gemeine Stinkmorchel, Erdei sz-m-rcs-g, Satirione, Grote Stinkzwam. Fruit body initially semi-submerged and covered by leaf-litter, egg-like, 3-6cm across, attached to substrate by a cord-like mycelial strand. The outer wall of the egg is white to pinkish but there is a thick gelatinous middle layer held between the membranous inner and outer layers. The egg is soon ruptured, as the white hollow stalk-like receptacle extends to 10-25cm high, the pendulous, bell-shaped head is covered by a meshwork of raised ribs covered in dark olive slime which contains the spores. This slime has a strong sickly offensive smell which attracts flies from large distances, the slime sticks to the legs of the flies and thus acts as a means of spore dispersal which takes place very rapidly, exposing the underlying mesh of the cap. Spores pale yellow, oblong, 3.5-4 x 1.5-2-. Habitat associated with rotting wood which may be buried in the soil, in gardens and woodland. Season summer to late autumn. Very common. The egg stage, which lacks the disgusting smell, is edible though not tasty; it is said to be an aphrodisiac presumably through association with its phallic shape. Distribution, America and Europe. The second picture was taken by Geoffrey Kibby. The latest one sent in from Australia does not look the same as the European species, mainly because of the scarlet colour, is there an Australian name for this fungus?
Poisonous/Suspect
Phaeolepiota aurea (Matt. ex Fr.) Maire ex Konrad & Maublanc Aranys-rga t-kegomba. Cap 2-15cm across, obtuse to convex, becoming flatter with a central umbo and the margin often hung with veil remnants; orange-tan to golden brown; dry, granular to powdery. Gills adnate to free, close, broad; pale yellow becoming tawny to orange-brown. Stem 40-150 x 10-40mm expanded toward the base; orange to buff or similar to cap; smooth above the ring, powdery or granular below. Veil partial veil sheathing stalk; same color as cap; granular underneath, smooth above; leaving persistent flaring to drooping ring. Flesh thick; pale or yellowish. Spores ellipsoid, smooth to minutely roughened, 10-14 x 5-6-. Deposit yellowish brown to orange-buff. Habitat in groups or clusters on compost, rich soil, humus, or leaf litter under coniferous or deciduous trees. Quite rare but sometimes abundant. Found in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Season September-October. Not edible because it is mildly poisonous to some people. The field photograph was taken by Geoffrey Kibby.
Inedible
Paxillus panuoides (Fr.) Fr. syn. Tapinia panuoides Sutara Muschelkrempling Nyeletlen c?l?pgomba. Cap 1?6cm across, ochraceous to buff or fulvous, downy and often with lilac tomentum especially toward the point of attachment. Stem up to 10mm, entirely absent or rudimentary and lateral. Flesh ochraceous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills decurrent, crowded, branched and wavy, pale buff bruising darker. Spore print ochraceous rust. Spores ellipsoid, 4?5.5 x 3?4um. Habitat on conifer debris, causing the infected wood to become soft and discolour bright yellow. Season late summer to late autumn. Uncommon. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Poisonous/Suspect
Paxillus involutus (Fr.) Fr. Brown Rollrim, Paxille enroul?, Kahler Krempling, Beg?ngy?ltsz?l? c?l?pgomba, Gewone krulzoom. Cap 5?12cm across, ochraceous or fulvous with olivaceous flush at first becoming more rusty-brown and finally hazel or snuff brown, viscid at centre when wet, downy throughout particularly at margin which remains inrolled, becoming smooth later. Stem up to 75 x 8?12mm, concolorous with cap becoming stained chestnut especially with age or on bruising. Flesh pale ochre in cap, fulvous in stem base, darkening on cutting. Taste acidic, smell fungusy. Gills decurrent, crowded, pale ochre then sienna, bruising vinaceous or chestnut. Spore print sienna. Spores ellipsoid, 8?10 x 5?6um. Habitat in broad-leaved woodland, especially with birch on acid heathland. Season late summer to late autumn. Very common. Deadly Poisonous ? After eating over a period it has been known to cause death. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Paxillus atrotomentosus (Fr.) Fr. Syn Tapinella atromentosus Sutara Samtfusskrempling B?rsonyost?nk? c?l?pgomba Paxille ? pied noir. Cap 12?28cm across, snuff-brown or sepia with sienna patches, depressed in the centre, margin inrolled, slightly downy. Stem 30?90 x 20?50mm, sometimes lateral, rooting, covered in a fine olivaceous buff down which becomes more coarse, velvety and dark brown with age. Flesh cream, ochre or buff in stem. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills crowded, joining to give a vein-like network near the stem. Spore print sienna. Spores ellipsoid, 5?6.5 x 3?4.5um. Habitat tufted on stumps of conifers, were it causes brown rot. Season late summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible, Suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe. A new genus has been proposed for this fungus (Tapinella), and it will probably become the preferred name.
Inedible
Mutinus caninus (Pers.) Fr. Dog Stinkhorn, Phallus de Chien, Satyre des cheins, Hundsrute, K-z-ns-ges kutyasz-m-rcs-g, Fallo canino, mutino canino, Kliene Stinkzwam, Kutyasz-m-rcs-g. Fruit body initially a semi-submerged eggs as in Phallus impudicus but much smaller, 1-2cm across and more cylindric in shape, whitish-yellow, finally rupturing when the hollow pitted receptacle extends. Stem 10-12cm high, pale yellow-buff to bright orange, surmounted by the narrow conical orange-red head covered in dark olive slime which contains the spores and has a very slight sickly smell. Spores pale yellow, oblong, 4-5 x 1.5-2-. Habitat in leaf litter in woods. Season summer to late autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Cucumber Cap Macrocystidia cucumis (Pers.: Fr.) Joss. Cucumber Cap Hamvas uborkagomba. Cap 0.8-5cm, conical to bell-shaped, dry and smooth, expanding with age, dark, blackish-brown to purplish-brown when young and moist, becoming paler, reddish-brown as it ages and dries, often with much paler margin. Stem 20-60 x 1-3mm, slender, cylindrical or slightly flattened, pale cream above, darker orange-brown to blackish at base, surface usually distinctly velvety. Flesh thin, pale brown. Smell very strong, a mixture of raw fish and cucumber. Taste very unpleasant, rancid, or with cod-liver oil component. Spore print dull pinkish brown. Spores 7.5-10x3.5-5.0?, smooth, narrowly ellipsoid. Cystidia on edge of gill large, swollen with long, narrow point. Habitat in woodlands and gardens in humus-rich, nitrogen-rich places, now becoming very common on woodchip mulches in gardens. Season early summer to late autumn. Frequent to common. Not Edible. Distribution Europe. Thanks to Geoffrey Kibby for this picture and text.
Edible
Lycoperdon pyriforme Schaeff. ex Pers. Birnenst?ubling K?rtealak? (k?rte alak?) p?feteg Vesse-de-loup en poire, Stump Puffball. Fruit body 1.5?4cm across, 3.5cm high, subglobose to club-shaped, attached to the substrate by mycelial strands, whitish at first finally yellowish- or greyish-brown, outer layer of scurfy spines, warts, or granules, inner wall becoming smooth and papery, opening by an apical pore. Gleba olive-brown; sterile base occupying the stem spongy, but the cavities forming rather small cells. Spores olive-brown, globose, smooth, 3?4um in diameter. Capillitium distinctive in being formed of brownish branched threads which lack all trace of tiny hyaline pores, all other members of the genus have poroid capillitial threads. Habitat in groups or swarms on rotten logs or stumps, often appearing to grow in soil but in reality attached to buried wood by the characteristic white mycelial cords. Season summer to late autumn. Common. Edible when young. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Lycoperdon perlatum Pers. syn. L. gemmatum Batsch Flaschenst?ubling, Flaschenbovist, Bimb?s p?feteg, Vesse-de-loup ? pierreries, Common Puffball. Fruit body 2.5?6cm across, 2?9cm high, subglobose with a distinct stem, white at first becoming yellowish brown, outer layer of short pyramidal warts especially dense on the head, rubbing off to leave an indistinct mesh-like pattern on the inner wall which opens by a pore. Gleba olive-brown at maturity; sterile base spongy, occupying the stem. Spores olivaceous-brown, globose, minutely warted, 3.5?4.5m. Habitat woodland. Season summer to late autumn. Common. Edible and good -when the flesh is pure white. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Lycoperdon molle Pers. Barn?s p?feteg, puha bimb?sp?feteg. Fruit body 1-4cm across, 6cm high, usually pear-shaped; grayish brown to milky-coffee colored; minutely spiny or granular. Spore mass white, dark brown in maturity; inner spore case opening by a wide, irregular pore. Sterile base has large chambers; sometimes wide and sometimes narrowed to a distinct stalk. Spores globose, 3.5-5 x 3.5-5?. Habitat on soil or humus in deciduous or coniferous forests. Frequent but not abundant. Found widely distributed in North America. Season August-October. Edible when flesh completely white.
Edible
Leccinum variicolor Watling syn. L. oxydabile (Sing.) Sing. p.p. Verschiedenfarbiger Rauhfuss Tarkah?s? ?rdestin?ru (-tin?ru) Mottled Bolete. Cap 5?10cm, stippled mouse-grey to dark brown, initially felty and dry, later smooth and slightly viscid. Stem 125?180 x 20?25mm, white, with mouse-grey scales but bruising greenish yellow on handling. Flesh pink in the cap, intensely blue-green in stem base. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white or pale cream. Pores small, similarly coloured, bruising pink or vinaceous. Spore print snuff-brown with cinnamon flush. Spores subfusiform, 14?20 x 5?6um. Habitat with birch. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible. Found In Europe.
Edible
Bolete Leccinum scabrum (Fr.) S. F. Gray syn. Boletus scaber Fr. Brown Birch Bolete, Bolet rude, Brauner Birkenpilz, Barna -rdestin-ru (-tin-ru), Porcinello grigio, cravetta grigia, Berkeboleet. Cap 5-15cm, hazel, fulvous or snuff-brown, dry but tacky in wet weather. Stem 70-200 x 20-30mm, white to grey covered with brownish-black scales becoming darker towards the base. Flesh white, very soft, watery, unchanging or flushing pale pink. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white becoming dirty ochraceous. Pores small, white then dingy, bruising ochraceous. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform, 14-20 x 5-6um. Habitat with birch. Season summer to autumn. Common. Edible - not worthwhile. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Leccinum quercinum (Pil?t) Green and Watling Eichen-Rotkappe T?lgyfa ?rdestin?ru (-tin?ru) Orange Oak Bolete. Cap 6?15cm, chestnut to date-brown, fibrillose scaly, becoming smooth and more rusty, margin overhanging the pores. Stem 110?180 x 20?35mm, pale brown to buff at apex with whitish scales becoming pale brown, stem whitish to buff towards base with whitish scales becoming rusty or purplish date, darkening on handling. Flesh white to cream rapidly pink or vinaceous in cap, more grey in the stem sometimes with a slight green flush in the base. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white to pale buff becoming vinaceous or cigar-brown. Pores small, similarly coloured. Spore print snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform, 12?15 x 3.5?5um. Habitat with oak. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Edible. Found In Europe. The photograph with 12 specimens comes from Ted Green, thanks Ted.
Inedible
Leccinum holopus (Rostk.) Watling syn. Boletus holopus Rostk. Moor-Birkenpilz L-pi -rdestin-ru (-tin-ru) Ghost Bolete. Cap 4-7(10)cm, dirty white to pale buff becoming darker and flushed greenish with age, smooth, viscid when fresh. Stem 80-110-8-15(30)mm, white or pale buff, covered with white scales discolouring cinnamon with age. Flesh soft, white, blue green in stem base, often pink elsewhere or unchanging. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white to clay-buff. Pores white to buff, flushed cinnamon with age or on bruising. Spore print cinnamon-ochraceous buff. Spores subfusiform, 17.5-20-5.5-6.5m. Habitat amongst sphagnum under birches. Season autumn. Rare. Edible - not worthwhile. Distribution, America and Europe. Thanks to the Pash family for the last picture.
Inedible
Leccinum carpini (R. Schulz) Moser ex Reid syn. Boletus carpini (R. Schulz) Pearson New syn, Leccinum pseudoscabrum Hainbuchen-Rauhfuss, S-t-t -rdestin-ru (-tin-ru), Bolet raboteux, Bolet des charmes. Cap 3-9cm, pale buff, snuff-brown or tawny olive, slightly wrinkled and often cracked. Stem 80-90 x 8-11mm, punctate with pale buff scales at apex and darker brown scales below, blackening on handling. Flesh in stem white to straw-coloured and in the stem base immediately blue spotted but rose or vinaceous in the cap and stem apex, rapidly blackening throughout. Tubes white or cream, rapidly coral or vinaceous or cutting, then blackening. Pores small, white at first then yellowish buff, blackening on handling. Spore print ochraceous snuff-brown. Spores subfusiform, 15-19 x5-6um. Surface of cap composed of erect chains of globose to barrel-shaped segments. Habitat with hazel or hornbeam, occasionally with oak. Season summer. Rare. Edible - not worthwhile. Found In Europe.
Edible
Leccinum aurantiacum (Fr.) Gray syn. Boletus aurantiacus Espen-Rotkappe V?r?s ?rdestin?ru, t?lgyfa ?rdes tin?ru Bolet orang?. Cap 8?16cm across, orange to apricot, brown, smooth or slightly downy-fibrillose, cuticle overhanging tubes as an irregular skirt up to 3mm deep. Stem 80?140 x 18?48mm, initially covered in white scales which gradually turn rusty then dark brown. Flesh cream turning vinaceous in cap and stem base and sepia elsewhere. Taste and smell pleasant. Tubes white, vinaceous on exposure to air. Pores very small, white or cream bruising vinaceous. Spore print ochraceous buff. Spores subfusiform, 14?16.5 x 4?5um. Habitat with aspens. Season late summer to autumn. Rare. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
1
2
3
4
5
...
12
13
14