Rusty brown Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
Habitat:
Stem type:
Spore colour:
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Total mushrooms fount: 157

Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Telamonia) bulliardii (Fr.) Fr. Zinnoberroter Gürtelfuss Vöröslábú pókhálósgomba Cortinaire de Bulliard Hotfoot Webcap Cap 4–8cm across, convex then expanded, deep red-brown to chestnut drying ochre-buff. Stem 50–100 x 10–15mm, whitish near apex becoming rust towards the base and covered in reddish fibres. Flesh whitish, sometimes reddish at stem base. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills violaceous at first, soon rusty. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic, rough, 8–10 x 5–6µ. Habitat deciduous wood, especially beech. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility Suspect – avoid as many Cortinarius contain toxins. Found In Europe. edibility: Poisonous/Suspect fungus colour: Red or redish or pink normal size: 5-15cm cap type: Convex to shield shaped stem type: Bulbous base of stem spore colour: Rusty brown habitat: Grows in woods, Grows on the ground
Inedible
Ganoderma lucidum (Curt. ex Fr.) Karst. Gl-nzender Lackporling, Pecs-tviasz-tapl-, pecs-tviaszgomba, Ganoderme luisant, Ganoderme laque, Polypore lucide, Lacquered Bracket. Fruit body usually stalked. Bracket 10-25cm in diameter, 2-3cm thick, fan- or kidney-shaped, laterally attached, concentrically grooved and zoned ochraceous to orange brown, later purple-brown to blackish, and like the stem conspicuously glossy as if varnished. Stem up to 250 x 10-30mm, dark brown, glossy. Tubes 0.5-2cm long. Pores 4-5 per mm, circular, whitish then cream, finally tobacco brown, darkening on bruising when fresh. Spores rusty, ellipsoid-ovate with truncate end, 7-13 x 6-8um. Habitat on roots of deciduous trees. Season all year. Rare. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. ---- Habitat • Near or at the base, at the soil line, or attached to roots of living trees • On stumps and bases of dead trees, and sometimes from buried wood residues where trees have been removed Fruiting Time of Year • Summer through fall, turning black and persisting through to the following year Fruiting (Hymenial) Surface • White with small pores, 4-5 per mm, changing to brown with age Type of Decay • White root and butt rot Mode of Action • A moderately fast progressing root and butt rot The fungus can also kill cambial tissues and cause root death Frequency • Very common Tree Health Symptoms • Thin crowns • Dead branches • Yellowing leaves • Overall poor vigor • Some trees show no apparent health impacts from infection Edibility/Medicinal • Medicinal; used as an anti-inflammatory treatment • Sold in teas and pills in most oriental stores • Documented health benefits in medical literature Identifying Features (see adjacent photos) • Single or clusters of round to half-moon shaped conks usually attached directly to wood but occasionally with a lateral or central stem • 10 cm (4 in) up to 35 cm (14 in) across and 2.5 cm (1 in) or more thick • Cap or the top of the conk “varnished” red to mahogany with or without a white margin • Reddish-brown zonate interior or context • White pore surface that edges brown when fresh
Inedible
Serpula lacrymans (Fr.) Karst. syn. Merulius lacrymans Schum. Dry Rot Fungus, Hausschwamm, K?nnyez? h?zigomba, Huiszwam. Fruit body 5?50cm across, usually resupinate but occasionally forming brackets on vertical substrates, arising from whitish, pinkish, lilac or grey mycelium. Flesh 2?12mm thick, greyish-white, spongy-fleshy. Pores rusty-yellow becoming more yellowish towards the thick, white sterile margin. Spores rust-brown, elliptic, 8?10 x 5?6um. The fungus gives off a distinctive damp rotten smell. Habitat on worked wood in buildings although the fruit bodies of the fungus may also appear on non-organic substrates such as plaster or brickwork. Season all year. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Infection of wood occurs when it has become sodden for some long time following prolonged damp due to leaking roofs or pipes, either by spores or by vegetative mycelium spreading through brickwork. On germination of the spores the mycelia exhibit two distinct modes of growth. Firstly, numerous fine hyphae penetrate the wood, producing enzymes which break down the wood and enable the fungus to absorb nutrients; as the wood dries it cracks into cubical blocks and eventually disintegrates into brown powder. It is the second mode of growth which is most easily detected since it takes the form of thick mycelial cords and cottony sheets spreading over brickwork, metal, etc. enabling the fungus to travel over areas from which it cannot derive nutrients. The fruit bodies arise from these mycelial cords. Thios phoyograph was lent to me by Alan and Patie Outen.
Inedible
Pholiota squarrosa (M-ller ex Fr.) Kummer syn. Dryophila squarrosa (M-ller ex Fr.) Qu-l. Shaggy Scalycap, Pholiote squarreuse, Sparriger Sch-ppling, T-sk-s t-kegomba, Schubbige bundelzwam. Cap 3-10(15)cm across, convex becoming flattened, the margin remaining inrolled, pale straw-yellow densely covered in coarse red-brown, upturned scales, not viscid. Stem 50-120 x 10-15mm, smooth and pale yellow above torn membranous ring, covered in red-brown recurved scales below and darkening at the base. Flesh tough, pale yellowish becoming red-brown in stem base. Taste and smell radishy. Gills crowded, pale yellow at first later cinnamon. Pleurocystidia clavate with mucronate apex. Spore print rust brown. Spores oval, smooth, 5.5-9 x 3.5-5um. Habitat in dense clusters at the base of deciduous and very occasionally coniferous trees. Season autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Pholiota flammans (Fr.) Kummer Freuersch-ppling L-ngsz-n- t-kegomba (l-nggomba) Pholiote flamboyante Flaming Scalycap. Cap 2-8cm across, convex then expanded, tawny yellow covered in recurved lemon- to sulphur-yellow scales, margin incurved. Stem 40-80 x 4-10mm, bright yellow with concolorous cottony ring near the apex, densely covered in concolorous scales below. Flesh pale yellow. Gills pale yellow darkening to rusty yellow with age. Pleurocystidia lanceolate with pointed apex, staining deeply in cotton blue in lactic acid. Spore print rusty. Spores elliptic, 4-4.5 x 2-2.5um. Habitat singly or in tufts on conifer stumps or fallen trunks. Season late summer to autumn. Rare, more frequent in mountains. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Pholiota aurivella (Fr.) Kummer Rozsdas?rga (s?rga) t?kegomba. Cap 4-15cm across, bell-shaped to convex with a broad umbo; ochre-orange to tawny; sticky to slimy with large flattened spot-like scales, which may disappear or become somewhat sticky when wet. Gills adnate, close, moderately broad; pale yellowish becoming tawny brown. Stem 50-80 x 5-15mm, dry, solid, central or off-center; yellowish to yellow-brown; dry and cottony above the ring, hairy and with down-curving scales toward the base. Veil partial veil leaves evanescent ring or zone on upper stalk; white. Flesh firm; yellow. Odor sweet. Taste slight. Spores ellipsoid, smooth, with pore at apex, 7-9.5 x 4.5-6?. Deposit rusty brownish. Caulocystidia absent; pleurocystidia present. Habitat in clusters on living trunks and logs of hardwoods and conifers. Found Europe and in North America except the Southeast. Season June-November. Not edible.
Inedible
Pholiota alnicola (Fr.) Sing. syn. Flammula alnicola (Fr.) Kummer syn. Dryophila alnicola (Fr.) Qu?l. Erlen-Sch?ppling S?rga t?kegomba Alder Scalycap. Cap 2?6(11)cm across, convex to flattened, smooth and greasy, bright lemon-yellow at first becoming flushed olivaceous at the margin, remains of veil often adhering to the margin. Stem 20?80 x 5?10mm, pale lemon-yellow above the remains of the veil becoming rusty-brown towards the base, not viscid. Flesh yellow in cap, rusty towards the stem base. Taste mild to slightly bitter, smell pleasant and sweet. Gills pale yellow at first becoming cinnamon. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, hair-like, clavate. Spore print rusty brown. Spores oval, smooth, 8.5?11.5 x 5?5.5um. Habitat solitary or in small clusters on deciduous wood, especially alder, willow and birch. Season autumn. Uncommon. Inedible. Distribution, America and Europe. Note the two forms that I have collected seem to differ in form and will need to be rechecked.
Poisonous/Suspect
Hebeloma sinapizans (Paulet ex Fr.) Gillet Rettichf?lbling Retekszag? fak?gomba H?b?lome couleur moutarde Bitter Poisonpie. Cap 4?12(20)cm across, convex then flattened and often wavy or upturned at the margin, ochre-brown or tan paling to cream or buff at the margin, greasy at first. Stem 50?120 x 10?20mm, swollen at the base, white covered in brownish scales forming a pattern of bands around the stem. Flesh whitish, becoming hollow in the stem often with a piece of the cap flesh hanging down into the stem cavity. Smell of radish. Gills pale clay-buff later with a cinnamon flush. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, with a slightly swollen body and a narrower neck. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped, warted, 10?14.5 x 6?8um. Habitat in deciduous and mixed woods. Season autumn. Uncommon. Poisonous. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Gymnopilus hybridus (Fr. ex Fr.) Sing. syn. Flammula hybrida (Fr. ex Fr.) Gillet. Orangeroter Tannenfl-mmling. Foltoslemez- l-nggomba (t-kegomba). Cap 2-8cm across, convex then expanded, pale ochraceous at first then bright rusty-orange but remaining pale at the inrolled margin. Stem 25-50 x 4-8mm, ochraceous at first with a white cortinate zone, later becoming rusty towards the base which is covered in white down. Flesh ochraceous in cap becoming more rusty in stem or hollow. Taste bitter, smell scented. Gills ochre yellow. Cheilocystidia skittle-shaped. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped, warted, 7-9 x 3.5-4.5um. Habitat on conifer stumps and debris. Season late summer. Frequent. Edibility Suspect -avoid. Some species of Gymnopilus can be deadly poisonous Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Galerina paludosa (Fr.) Kuehn. L-pi turj-ngomba. Cap ochre brown to reddish-ochre, 1-3cm finely granular, conical to convex. Gills adnate. Stem when young fibrous and flaky, with a distinct ring.4-12x1.5-3mm. Spore print rusty-yellowish brown, spores 9.5-11x6-7umfinely warty. Growing on sphagnum moss.
Poisonous/Suspect
Galerina marginata (Fr.) Kuehn. Feny? t?kegomba. Cap 1.5-4cmconvex then flat margin striate, pale ochre to yellow brown. Gills thin and crowded. Stem with scales ochre-honey distinctly darker below. Smell and taste floury. Spores almond shaped 8-10.5 ( 14)x5-6(7.25). Found on conifer wood.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Cortinarius) violaceus (L. ex Fr.) Fr. Dunkelvioletter Dickfuss S?t?tlila p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire violet Violet Webcap Cap 3.5?15cm across, convex, margin incurved, dark violaceous to blue-black, covered in fine downy scales. Stem 60?120 x 10?20mm (20?40mm at base), swollen to bulbous at base, dark blue-violaceous, covered in woolly fibrils. Flesh violaceous, more strongly so below cap cuticle and in stem. Taste mild, smell slight, of cedar wood. Gills dark violet becoming purplish brown. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic to almond-shaped, rough, 12?15 x 7?8.5?. Habitat deciduous woods, especially oak, birch and beech, also occasionally with conifers. Season autumn. Rare. Said to be edible, but I advise that you do not eat it as all Cortinarius contain some toxins. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Myxacium) trivialis Lange syn. M. collinitum var. repandum Ricken Natternstieger Schleimfuss Ny?lk?st?nk? p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire trivial, Cortinaire graisseux Cap 3.5?11cm across, conico-convex then expanded and slightly umbonate, ochraceous tawny to bay brown, very viscid. Stem 50?120 x 10?20mm, viscid, apex whitish, concolorous with cap below and covered in whitish scales. Flesh pale yellowish, brownish below the cap cuticle and in the lower part of the stem. Taste mild, smell none. Gills pale clay then ochre to rust. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped, roughened 10?13 x 6?7?. Habitat in damp deciduous woods, usually with alder or willow. Season autumn. Rare. Edibility unknown ?avoid, many Cortinarius contain toxins ?avoid, many Cortinarius contain toxins. Found In Europe and America.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Telamonia) torvus (Bull. ex Fr.) Fr. Wohlriechender G?rtelfuss Szagos p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire farouche Stocking Webcap Cap 3?10cm across, convex then flattened, clay-brown, covered in darker innate radiating fibrils. Stem 40?60 x 10?15mm, slightly swollen at base, clay-buff flushed violaceous above the membranous sheathing ring. Flesh buff flushed violaceous in upper stem. Taste slightly bitter or stinging, smell heavy and sweet. Gills lilac-clay at first later light brown to rust. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic, minutely rough, 8?10 x 5?6.5?. Habitat deciduous woods, especially beech. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edibility Suspect ? avoid as many Cortinarius contain toxins. Distribution, America and Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Phlegmacium) splendens Henry. Schwefelklumpfuss Okkers?rga p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire resplendissant Splendid Webcap Cap 3?6(8)cm across, convex then expanded and often wavy at the margin, bright sulphur yellow often with tawny centre or spotting. Stem 25?60 x 7?12mm, 15?25mm at the distinctly marginate bulb, sulphur yellow becoming tinged rust especially towards the base, arising from sulphur yellow mycelium; cortina sulphur yellow. Flesh bright sulphur yellow. Taste mild, smell none. Gills bright sulphur yellow then rusty. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped and roughened, 10?11(14) x 5?6.5?. NaOH turns cap cuticle dark red to reddish brown. Habitat beech woods on chalk. Season autumn. Uncommon. Edibility suspect -avoid. Found In Europe.
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Phlegmacium) sodagnitus Henry Violtter Klumpfuss Lilat?nk? p?kh?l?sgomba Bitter Bigfoot Webcap Cap 3?10cm across, convex, bright violaceous at first discolouring ochraceous to buff from centre outwards, fading to silvery; lilac at the margin with age. Stem 25?100 x 5?18mm, 12?30mm at the distinctly marginate bulb, violaceous like the cap at first discolouring ochraceous from the base up except for a persistent narrow violet zone at the apex; cortina violaceous. Flesh whitish with violaceous flush in stem apex and ochraceous tinge in bulb. Taste bitter in the cap cuticle, flesh mild, smell faint, mushroomy. Gills violet then clay-pink to umber; edge remaining violaceous a long time. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped, rough, 10?12 x 5.5?6.5?. NaOH turns cap cuticle bright red. Habitat beech woods, usually on chalk. Season autumn. Occasional. Edibility suspect -avoid. Found In Europe and America.
Poisonous/Suspect
Poisonous/Suspect
Cortinarius (Phlegmacium) purpurascens [Fr.] Fr. Purpurfleckender Klumpfuss B?borbarna p?kh?l?sgomba, rozsdafoltos p?kh?l?sgomba Cortinaire purpurac? Bruising Webcap syn. P. purpurascens ([Fr.]Fr.) Ricken syn. P. porphyropus ([Alb. & Schw.] Fr.) W?nsche s. Ricken Cap 5?15cm across, hemispherical then expanded and often broadly umbonate, margin becoming wavy, tawny-buff to dark umber often violet-tinged and streaked or spotted. Stem 50?120 x 15?25mm, with a marginate or immarginate bulb 20?30mm across, violaceous sometimes discolouring pallid near the base; cortina purplish. Flesh violaceous becoming deep purple when bruised or cut. Taste mild, smell none or very faint but pleasant. Gills purplish-violet then clay-buff to cinnamon, violaceous tinge often persisting, becoming deep purple when bruised. Spore print rust. Spores almond-shaped to elliptic, rough, 8.5?10 x 4.5?6?. Habitat deciduous and coniferous woods. Season autumn. Occasional. Edibility suspect -avoid. Distribution, America and Europe.
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