Simple stem Mushrooms identifications

Edibility:
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Total mushrooms fount: 425

Edible
Boletus aereus, described by some as the Queen Bolete but just lately given the normal name Bronze Bolete in Britain and Ireland, is a most sought-after edible mushroom. It is merely as good as its famous close relative, Boletus edulis (Cep or Cent Bun Bolete) but its flesh is quite firmer. In the pub marketplaces of France, for example, these excellent boletes can be purchased as well as Boletus edulis and Boletus reticulatus, and customers are evenly happy with whichever of the meaty mushroom varieties can be found. A exceptional find in Ireland and Britain, where it is restricted to southern parts mainly, Boletus aereus is a lot more prevalent in southern European countries. Commonly bought at the sides, beside strolls or in clearings in oak and beech woodlands, Boletus aereus will berry just a little than boletus edulis later, which looks later than the summertime Bolete relatively, Boletus reticulatus. Most boletes, and certainly every one of the common ones within Britain and Ireland, are ectomycorrhizal fungi. Which means that they form mutualistic romantic relationships with the main systems of trees and shrubs or shrubs. The fungi help the tree to obtain moisture and essential minerals from the soil, and in exchange the main system of the tree gives energy-rich nutrients, the merchandise of photosynthesis, to the fungal mycelium. Although most trees and shrubs may survive without their mycorrhizal companions, boletes (and a great many other varieties of forest-floor fungi) cannot endure without trees; subsequently these so-called 'obligately mycorrhizal' fungi do not happen in wide open grassland. The medical name Boletus aerus started in Jean Baptiste Francois Pierre Bulliard's 1789 descriotipon of the varieties. Synonyms of Boletus aereus includeBoletus mamorensis Redeuilh. The universal name Boletus comes from the Greek bolos, indicating lump of clay; the foundation of the precise epithet aereus is Latin and means copper or bronze (in shade) - hence the normal name Bronze Bolete. Some individuals make reference to it as the Dark colored Porcini or the Dark Cover Bolete. Boletus aereus, the dark cep or bronze bolete, is a highly prized and much sought-after edible mushroom in the family Boletaceae. Dark cigar brown, bay to dark sepia, often dark brick-coloured near the margin, minutely cracking making the surface roughly textured, slightly downy at first then smooth. Stem 60-80 x 11-12mm, robust, covered with network which is brown near apex, clay pink or buff around the middle and rusty below. Flesh white, unchanging or becoming dirty vinaceous when bruised. Taste pleasant, smell strong and earthy. Boletus aereus comes with an earthy smell and a pleasurable mild taste. Habitat with broad-leaved trees, especially beech and oak. To Oct in Britain and Ireland august, this bolete are available from Oct to Feb in a few elements of southern European countries. ( Season summer to autumn ) Rare. Edible. Distribution, America and Europe. Cap: First downy but becoming gentle with a finely damaged or granular surface soon, the dark-brown to dark sepia-brown hats of Boletus aereus range between 7 to 20cm size at maturity. The cover margin is a far more reddish brownish than the centre often. When cut, the cover flesh remains white or very gradually converts somewhat purplish usually. Spores: Spores olivaceous snuff-brown, subfusiform, 13,5 - 16 x 4 - 5 ┬Ám. Pores and tubes: Tubes white to cream, finally sulphur-yellow. Pores similarly coloured but bruising vinaceous on handling and often flushed rust with age. The pipes of Boletus aereus (seen when the cover is damaged or chopped up) are white or pale cream, becoming smart sulphur yellow at maturity; they terminate in really small creamy white skin pores that become rust-coloured (see remaining) with years. When bruised or cut, the skin pores and pipes of Boletus aereus swiftly do not change shade, but after the right time they create a vinaceous tinge. Stem: A fine brown online structure (reticulum) is obvious on the pale darkish track record of the stem surface, darkest on the apex with the bottom and usually relatively paler and pinker near to the inflamed centre of the stem. Sometimes clavate (club-shaped) but more regularly barrel-shaped, the stem of Boletus aereus is 5 to 12cm high or more to 8cm in size at its widest point. The stem flesh is white and incredibly organization. Habitat & Ecological role: Boletus aereus develops on garden soil beneath broadleaf trees and shrubs, beech and oaks notably. Similar species Boletus edulis has a pale stem with a white reticulum; its dark brown cover has a whitish marginal region. Tylopilus felleus has a darker stem reticulum and a pinkish tinge to its skin pores; it has an extremely bitter taste.
Inedible
Tubaria furfuracea (Pers. ex Fr.) Gillet. Sch?ppchen-Trompetenschnitzling Gyakori szem?tgomba, t?li szem?tgomba Scurfy Twiglet. Cap 1?4cm across, convex then flattened or centrally depressed, cinnamon to tan and striate from margin inwards when moist drying pale buff and slightly scurfy. Stem 20?50 x 2?4mm, more or less concolorous with the cap, base covered in white down. Flesh concolorous. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills broad, distant, adnate to slightly decurrent, cinnamon. Cheilocystidia thin-walled, hyaline, cylindric to clavate. Spore print pale ochre. Spores elliptic with rounded apex, 7?9?4.5?5m. Habitat on twigs and woody debris. Season all year, usually autumn to early winter. Common. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula xerampelina Gemeiner Heringst-ubling Barnul-h-s- galambgomba Russule feuille-morte Crab Brittlegill Russula xerampelina (Schaeff. ex Secr.) Fr. (R. faginea Romagn. in part) Cap 5-14 cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, colours very varied, often mixed, dull purples, reds, wine-coloured, cinnamon, straw, fawn, brick or dull brown, moderately firm, sometimes hard, soon dry and matt; margin eventually furrowed, one-quarter peeling at most. Stem 30-110-10-30mm, white or tinted rose, staining honey to brownish ochre especially on bruising, firm to hard, reacting dull green when rubbed with iron salts. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell crab-like especially with age. Gills adnexed, pale to medium ochre, fairly broad and thick, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print deep cream to pale ochre (E-F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1.2m high, lines none or few, occasionally enclosing a mesh, 8-11-6.5-9m. Cap cystidia infrequent, mostly narrow, not reacting to SV. Cap hyphae with terminal cells sometimes club-shaped, and these and the supporting cells inflated. Habitat under broad-leaved trees, especially beech and oak. Season late summer to late autumn. Common. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Divided by some authorities into a number of different species and varieties.
Edible
Russula virescens (Schaeff. ex Zantedschi) Fr. Gefelderter Gr-nt-ubling, Varas z-ld galambgomba, varash-t- galambgomba, Russule verdoyante, Bise verte, Greencracked Brittlegill. Cap 5-12cm across, globose, later convex, finally flattening and often wavy and lobed, verdigris to dull green often ochre-buff to cream in places, half peeling; surface breaking up into small, flattened, angular, scurfy scales. Stem 40-90 x 20-40mm, whitish to pale cream, browning slightly, powdered above, firm. Flesh white. Odor pleasant. Taste mild, nutty. Gills almost free, cream, somewhat brittle, with veins connecting the bases. Spore print whitish to pale cream (A-B). Spores ellipsoid-ovoid to somewhat globose with warts 0.2-0.5- high, fine lines absent to fairly numerous and forming a fairly well-developed network, 7-9 x 6-7-. Cap cystidia none; gill cystidia few, not or hardly reacting with SV. Cap hyphae forming a loose, cellular layer of variously shaped or inflated cells, the terminal ones tapering. Habitat under broad-leaved trees, especially beech. Season summer to early autumn. Uncommon. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula violeipes Qu?l. Lilastieliger T?ubling, Velvet Brittlegill. Cap 4?8cm across, somewhat globose at first, then flattening and finally with a depression, straw, greenish-yellow (forma citrina) or olive tints, often in part, sometimes entirely, livid red, livid purple, lilac or wine-coloured, thick-fleshed, hard, powdered, hardly peeling. Stem 40?70 x 10?30mm, white, often tinged yellow, violet, purple or wine-coloured, firm, often powdered especially above. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell slight, when fresh of shrimps. Gills slightly decurrent, pale buffy straw, greasy to the touch. Spore print cream (C?D). Spores ovoid with warts 0.7?1? high, joined by lines or ridges to form a fairly well-developed network, 6.5?9 x 6?8?. No cap cystidia and very few on the gills and not reacting to SV. Gill margin fringed with tapering cells. Terminal cells of cap hyphae mostly tapering, supporting cells mostly inflated, sometimes balloon-shaped. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to early autumn. Uncommon. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Found In Europe.
Edible
Russula vinosa Lindblad syn. Russula obscura Romell. Borv-r-s galambgomba. Cap 5-15cm across; pale to dark blood red or livid purple; peeling only at margin. Gills somewhat distant; pale buff. Stem 40-150 x 15-30mm; white, flushing grayish black when bruised or with age. Flesh white, blackening. Odor not distinctive. Taste mild. Spores ovoid, 8-10 x 6.5-9-; warts up to 0.5- high, no connectives. Deposit ochre (E-F). Habitat in conifer woods and boggy areas. Found in Europe and northeastern North America. Season July-August. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.)
Edible
Russula vesca Fr. Bare-toothed Russula, Russule comestible, Fleischroter Speiset-ubling, R-ncos galambgomba, r-ncost-nk- galambgomba, Rossola edule, Smakelijke russula. Cap 5-10cm across, somewhat globose at first, later flattened convex, rather variable in colour, often with pastel tints, from dark or pale wine-coloured to buff, sometimes with olive or greenish tints, fleshy, firm, the skin half peeling, tending to retreat from the margin leaving the underlying flesh visible. Stem 30-100 x 15-25mm, white, rather hard, often with somewhat pointed base. Flesh white. Taste mild, nutty. Gills adnexed, whitish to very pale cream, rather closely spaced, narrow, forked, especially near stem. Gills and stem surface rapidly deep salmon when rubbed with an iron salt. Spore print whitish (A). Spores ovoid with small warts up to 0.5- high, very occasionally with short lines attached or joining pairs, 6-8 x 5-6-. Cap cystidia cylindrical or spindle-shaped, without septa, hardly reacting to SV. Cap hyphae with cylindrical or tapering terminal cells or sometimes a long, tapering, thick-walled hair; supporting cells rectangular. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula turci Bres. Jodoform-T-ubling, J-dszag- galambgomba. Cap 3-10cm across, convex, soon flattening and with a depression, mauve, dark or dull purple, wine coloured, bay or dark fawny, paling in places, fleshy, sticky or even glutinous when moist, drying matt and often powdered, one third peeling. Stem 30-70 x 10-25mm, white, rarely tinged rose, becoming dirty or brownish, cylindrical or narrow club-shaped. Flesh white. Taste mild, smell of iodoform at stem base. Gills adnexed, saffron, with connecting veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre (G). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5- high, mostly joined by fine lines or ridges to form a well-developed network, 7-9 x 6-8-. Cap cystidia absent; hyphae with incrustations staining with fuchsin abundant. Habitat under conifers. Season early summer to autumn. Frequent in Scotland, rare in England. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula subfoetens Smith. Cap 5-10cm across, rounded then with a depressed center; dull honey yellow to brownish; margin coarsely tuberculate-striate, viscid when wet. Gills adnate, cream-yellow, often brown-spotted. Stem 50-100 x 10-25mm, narrowing near base, firm; pale honey yellow. Flesh pale straw, yellowing when cut, and turning bright golden in KOH. Odor slightly unpleasant, fetid. Taste hot in cap cuticle but mild in flesh. Spores oval-ellipsoid, 7-9 x 5-6-; warts 0.3-0.71- high, few connectives. Deposit cream (C-D). Habitat in mixed woods. Found in Europe and eastern North America, west to Michigan, south to North Carolina. Season July-September. Not edible.
Inedible
Russula sororia (Fr.) Romell (R. amoenolens Romagn.) Scharfer Bratt?ubling, Barna galambgomba, Russule soeur, Sepia Brittlegill. Cap 3?6cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, sepia to greyish sepia, rarely white, thinnish-fleshed, slightly sticky when moist, half-peeling; margin furrowed, with small, low warts. Stem 30?60 x 10?20mm, whitish, fairly firm to soft and fragile. Flesh white. Taste unpleasant, oily, slowly very hot; smell rancid or suggesting Camembert cheese. Gills adnexed, creamy to dirty whitish, edge browning. Spore print pale cream (B?D). Spores broadly elliptic with warts up to 0.7? high, a few joined by fine lines, no network, 7?9 x 5?7?. Cap cystidia narrow, tapering, poorly reacting to SV. Habitat under oak. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula sardonia Fr. Zitronenbl?ttriger T?ubling, Citromlemez? galambgomba, Russule ?cre, Russule ? couleur de sardoine, Primrose Brittlegill. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, later flattening and with a depression, violet-, purplish- or brownish-red, greenish or ochre to yellowish, hard, shortly peeling only. Stem 30?80 x 10?15mm, sometimes white but usually entirely pale lilac to greyish rose, firm; surface as if powdered. Flesh white. Taste very hot, smell slightly fruity. Gills adnexed to slightly decurrent, at first primrose, later pale golden yellow, narrow. Gills and flesh reacting rose with ammonia (distinguishes this species). Spore print cream (C?F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 0.5? high, joined into ridges or by fine lines to form a rather poorly developed network, 7?9 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia spindle-shaped or cylindrical, without septa, strongly reacting to SV. Habitat under pine. Season summer to autumn. Frequent. Found In Europe and western north America. Edibility suspect-not advisable.
Inedible
Russula sanguinea (Bull. ex St. Amans) Fr. Blut-T?ubling, V?rv?r?s galambgomba, Russule sanguine, Bloody Brittlegill. Cap 5?10cm across, convex, later flattening or saucer-shaped, blood to purplish-red or rose, often with whitish areas, fleshy, rigid or even hard, peeling at margin only; surface soon dry and matt, rough or veined. Stem 40?100 x 10?30mm, white, pink or red, firm. Flesh white. Taste slightly to moderately hot, also sometimes bitter. Gills adnate-decurrent, cream or pale ochre, narrow, forking or with cross-connections. Spore print pale to deep cream (C?F). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1? high, with very few connecting lines, 7?10 x 6?8?. Cap cystidia cylindrical to narrow club-shaped, often teat-ended, with 0?2 septa, somewhat poorly reacting to SV. Habitat under conifers. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Not edible. Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Russula pseudointegra Arn and Goris. Ockerbl?ttriger Zinnobert?ubling, Keser? galambgomba, Russule fausse Integra, Scarlet Brittlegill. Cap 4?10cm across, convex, later flattening, scarlet red to coral, sometimes with cream or whitish areas, fleshy, slightly sticky at first, later dry, sometimes slightly powdered, one- to two-thirds peeling. Stem 30?70 x 15?30mm, white. Flesh white. Taste slightly bitter, eventually with a suggestion of hotness, smell slightly of geranium with a touch of menthol. Gills free, pale golden yellow to saffron. Spore print pale ochre (F?G). Spores subglobose with warts up to 0.7? high, some isolated, mainly joined by fine lines forming a rather incomplete network, 7?9 x 6.5?8?. Cap cystidia absent, long, rather wide, hyphae with incrustations staining in fuchsin abundant. Habitat under broad-leaved trees especially oak on clay soils. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible but bitter -avoid. Found In Europe.
Inedible
Russula pectinatoides Pk. Enyhe galambgomba. Cap 3-8cm across, convex to centrally depressed, margin strongly striate- tuberculate; yellowish brown to dull straw color or cinnamon; viscid when wet; cuticle peels halfway or more. Gills thin; white to pale cream. Stem 25-50 x 5-l0mm, hollow, equal; white to pale yellowish or brown where bruised. Flesh white. Odor slightly oily or fetid. Taste mild or slightly acrid. Spores ovoid, 7.5-9 x 5.5-7.5?; warts 0.4-0.6? high, with an incomplete reticulum. Deposit cream (D-E). Habitat in mixed hardwoods. Quite common. Found in Europe and northeastern North America, west to Michigan, south to North Carolina. Season July-September. Not edible.
Edible
Russula parazurea J. Schaeff. Blaugr?ner Reift?ubling, K?kesz?ld galambgomba, deres galambgomba, Russule presque azur?e, Powdery Brittlegill. Cap 3?8cm across, convex then flattening, with greyish, dark colours, olive, violet-grey, greyish sepia or chestnut or tinged with dull green, wine or violet, firm, rather fleshy, sometimes greasy, usually matt, often as if powdered when dry, half to three quarters peeling. Stem 30?70 x 7?20mm, white. Flesh white. Taste mild or very slightly hot. Gills adnexed, pale buff, often forked. Spore print palish cream (C?D). Spores elliptic with warts up to 0.5? high, some isolated but mostly joined by lines forming a moderately developed network, 5.7?8.5 x 5?6.5?. Cap hyphae with the terminal cell usually tapering and the supporting cells rectangular. Cap cystidia cylindrical to narrow club-shaped, without septa, moderately reacting to SV. Habitat under broad-leaved trees. Season early summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Found In Europe.
Edible
Russula olivacea (Schaeff. ex Secr.) Fr. Rosastieger Ledert-ubling, Olajbarna galambgomba, v-r-st-nk- galambgomba, Russule oliv-tre, Olive Brittlegill. Cap 6-16cm across, almost globose at first, later flattened or slightly depressed, often irregular, varying considerably in colour from straw, pale ochre, shades of olive or brown to dull purple or purplish-red, firm or hard, thick-fleshed, peeling up to one-third only; margin inrolled at first. Stem 50-100 x 15-40mm, white, usually tinged rose or entirely so, yellowing slightly or browning around base, fairly hard. Flesh white, taste mild, nutty. Gills adnexed, deep buffy straw, forking and with cross connections near stem. Spore print ochre (G-H). Spores ovoid with warts up to 1.5- high, not or occasionally joined by lines, 8-11 x 7-9-. Cap cystidia absent, hyphae with rectangular, barrel- or ampoule-shaped cells, the terminal one sometimes strongly inflated. Phenol solution turns stem livid purple. Habitat under beech. Season summer to autumn. Occasional. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous) Distribution, America and Europe.
Edible
Russula ochroleuca (Pers. ex Secr.) Fr. Common Yellow Russula, Russule blanc ocr-, Zitronent-ubling, Fak-s-rga galambgomba, s-rga galambgomba, Geelwitte russula. Cap 4-10cm across, convex then flattening and with a depression, ochre, yellow or sometimes greenish yellow, fleshy, two-thirds peeling; margin eventually furrowed. Stem 40-70 x 15-25mm, white, greying slightly with age especially when waterlogged. Flesh white. Taste from mild to moderately hot. Gills adnexed, creamy. Spore print whitish to pale cream (A-C). Spores broadly ovoid with warts up to 1.2m high, joined by numerous fine lines forming a fairly well-developed network, 8-10 x 7-8-. Cap surface cystidia absent, hyphae 2-3- wide, often with yellow encrusting pigment. Habitat under broad-leaved trees and conifers. Season late summer to late autumn. Very common. Edible. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Found In Europe.
Inedible
Russula nigricans (Bull. ex M-rat) Fr. Blackening Russula, Russule noircissante, Dickbl-ttriger Schwarzt-ubling, Szenes galambgomba, rossola nereggiante, Grofplaatrussula. Cap 5-20cm across, convex, soon with a deep depression, dirty white, becoming brown and finally black, dry, fleshy, three-quarters peeling; margin incurved at first. Stem 30-80 x 10-40mm, white, then dull brown and or red, finally black, hard. Flesh white, becoming red on exposure and finally grey to black. Taste slowly hot, smell fruity. Gills adnate, straw to olive, greyish rose on bruising, eventually black, very thick and widely spaced, brittle, with numerous shorter gills between them. Spore print white (A). Spores ovoid with small warts under 0.5- high, mostly connected by fine lines to form a fairly well-developed, but partial network, 7-8 x 6-7-. No cap cystidia. Habitat under broad-leaved trees and conifers. Season summer to late autumn. Very common. Edible but poor in taste (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe.
Inedible
Geriefter Weicht-ubling. Russula nauseosa (Pers. ex Secr.) Fr. Cap 2-7cm across, convex, later flattening and finally with a shallow depression, wine coloured to red or often pale, washed-out colours, greyish rose, pale brownish, dull yellowish or tinged greenish, thin-fleshed, fragile, easily peeling; margin often shallowly warty and furrowed. Stem 20-75 x 5-15mm, white, often tinged brownish or yellowish, often narrow club-shaped, soft, fragile. Flesh white, stem often hollow. Taste mild or slightly hot. Gills almost free, saffron, thin, connected by veins at their bases. Spore print pale ochre to ochre (G-H). Spores ovoid to elliptic, with warts up to 1.2- high, isolated or occasionally with fine lines attached, 7-11 x 6-9-. Cap cystidia abundant, mainly club-shaped, with up to two septa. Habitat under conifers, possibly only in Scotland. Season late spring to early autumn. Rare. Edible - possibly best avoided due to its hot taste. Distribution, America and Europe.
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